brain http://wnpr.org en Drunk Tank Pink http://wnpr.org/post/drunk-tank-pink-3 <div><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">This hour: the way the thoughts we have and the decisions we make are influenced by forces that aren't always in our control.</span></p> Mon, 14 Jul 2014 15:57:23 +0000 Faith Middleton, Lori Mack & Jonathan McNicol 25192 at http://wnpr.org Drunk Tank Pink ADHD and Managing Emotions http://wnpr.org/post/adhd-and-managing-emotions-0 <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">We focus this hour on one of the nation's most respected clinicians and researchers working with teens and adults who have ADHD. Dr. Thomas E. Brown is Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine, and Associate Director of the Yale Clinic for Attention and Related Disorders. (There is sometimes a link between ADHD and autism.)</span></p><p>Dr. Brown's new book, <em>Smart but Stuck</em>, looks at how managing emotions plays a key role in the lives of those with ADHD, including those who have high I.Q. scores.</p><p> Mon, 07 Jul 2014 14:51:57 +0000 Faith Middleton, Lori Mack & Jonathan McNicol 24840 at http://wnpr.org ADHD and Managing Emotions Preschoolers Outsmart College Students In Figuring Out Gadgets http://wnpr.org/post/preschoolers-outsmart-college-students-figuring-out-gadgets <p>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMaCtapBduU</p> Mon, 30 Jun 2014 07:26:00 +0000 Michelle Trudeau 24491 at http://wnpr.org Preschoolers Outsmart College Students In Figuring Out Gadgets Once Thought to Be Caused By Demons, What Do We Know About Epilepsy Today? http://wnpr.org/post/once-thought-be-caused-demons-what-do-we-know-about-epilepsy-today-0 <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Historically, people with epilepsy were thought to be possessed by demons. Research has come a long way since then, but epilepsy remains mysterious. </span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that one in 26 people will be diagnosed with epilepsy in their lives. Annually, it costs more than $15 billion in medical costs and reduced work production.</span></p><p> Mon, 23 Jun 2014 13:00:00 +0000 John Dankosky, Tucker Ives, Lydia Brown & Catie Talarski 23993 at http://wnpr.org Once Thought to Be Caused By Demons, What Do We Know About Epilepsy Today? Head Injury Risk Rose In Cities After Bike-Sharing Rolled Out http://wnpr.org/post/brain-injuries-rose-cities-after-bike-sharing-rolled-out <em><strong>Editors' Note:</strong> This post has been revised to clarify and correct reporting on the findings of the bike helmet study. The researchers looked at head injuries, not just brain injuries, so the descriptions have been changed to head injuries throughout. The lead researcher said in response to follow-up questions that the study was designed to look at the risk of head injuries as a proportion of all injuries related to bicycling, so the headline and descriptions of the work have been changed to reflect that distinction. Thu, 12 Jun 2014 21:34:00 +0000 editor 23551 at http://wnpr.org Head Injury Risk Rose In Cities After Bike-Sharing Rolled Out Actress Speaks About Her Mother's Dementia http://wnpr.org/post/actress-speaks-about-her-mothers-dementia <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">You probably recognize actor Kimberly Williams-Paisley. She got her start in the Steve Martin movie, "Father of the Bride," and has starred in multiple TV sitcoms, including "Two and A Half Men" and "Nashville." </span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Williams-Paisley is a writer, too, and she recently shared the challenges her family faced after her mother was diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia in 2005.</span></p><p> Tue, 10 Jun 2014 19:37:12 +0000 Lucy Nalpathanchil 23381 at http://wnpr.org Actress Speaks About Her Mother's Dementia ADHD and Managing Emotions http://wnpr.org/post/adhd-and-managing-emotions <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">We focus this hour on one of the nation's most respected clinicians and researchers working with teens and adults who have ADHD. Dr. Thomas E. Brown is Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine, and Associate Director of the Yale Clinic for Attention and Related Disorders. (There is sometimes a link between ADHD and autism.)</span></p><p>Dr. Brown's new book, <em>Smart but Stuck</em>, looks at how managing emotions plays a key role in the lives of those with ADHD, including those who have high I.Q. scores.</p><p> Tue, 27 May 2014 17:14:15 +0000 Faith Middleton, Lori Mack & Jonathan McNicol 22585 at http://wnpr.org ADHD and Managing Emotions The "World's Strongest Librarian" On Tourette Syndrome, Weightlifting, and Mormonism http://wnpr.org/post/worlds-strongest-librarian-tourette-syndrome-weightlifting-and-mormonism <p>The story of Josh Hanagarne isn't necessarily funny. He was born with Tourette Syndrome, a poorly understood neuropsychiatric disorder which inflicts on Josh a blizzard of tics, flinches, whoops and yelps.&nbsp; Most disconcertingly, he frequently hits himself in the face.</p><p>Josh's first refuge was books, and that led to a career as a librarian. His second refuge was playing the guitar, which somehow distracted his mind from the triggers producing the tics. And his third refuge was exercise, specifically strength and weight training.&nbsp; Mon, 26 May 2014 10:00:00 +0000 Chion Wolf, Betsy Kaplan & Colin McEnroe 22348 at http://wnpr.org The "World's Strongest Librarian" On Tourette Syndrome, Weightlifting, and Mormonism Overexposed? Camera Phones Could Be Washing Out Our Memories http://wnpr.org/post/overexposed-camera-phones-could-be-washing-out-our-memories Los Angeles blogger Rebecca Woolf uses her blog, <a href="http://www.girlsgonechild.net/">Girl's Gone Child</a>, as a window into her family's life. Naturally, it includes oodles of pictures of her four children.<p>She says she's probably taken tens of thousands of photos since her oldest child was born. And she remembers the moment when it suddenly clicked — if you will — that she was too absorbed in digital documentation.<p>"I remember going to the park at one point, and looking around ... and seeing that <em>everyone</em> was on their phones ... Thu, 22 May 2014 21:18:00 +0000 NPR Staff 22357 at http://wnpr.org Overexposed? Camera Phones Could Be Washing Out Our Memories Marathon Bombing Study Makes Link Between Brain and Trauma http://wnpr.org/post/marathon-bombing-study-makes-link-between-brain-and-trauma <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">When the Boston Marathon bombing occurred, neuroscientists at Harvard University were midway through a study on trauma and the adolescent brain. As a result, they said they were able to make some new scientific links between PTSD and media exposure.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Last April, Professor Katie McLaughlin and her colleagues at Harvard were studying the brains of young people who’d been through serious adversity. They had recruited about 150 children and teens. Half had reported early trauma or stress, and half had not.</span></p> Wed, 21 May 2014 13:20:47 +0000 Karen Brown 22236 at http://wnpr.org Marathon Bombing Study Makes Link Between Brain and Trauma Newly Diagnosed With Epilepsy, and Not Sure What It Means http://wnpr.org/post/newly-diagnosed-epilepsy-and-not-sure-what-it-means <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Want to know how to scare your co-workers? Fall to the ground and have a seizure in front of everyone.</span></p><p>About two weeks ago, that’s what happened to me. I don’t remember what happened, and I only remember scattered moments from the rest of the day. The wire to my headphones snapped and my face was noticeably battered.</p><p> Tue, 06 May 2014 12:51:58 +0000 Tucker Ives 21329 at http://wnpr.org Newly Diagnosed With Epilepsy, and Not Sure What It Means Once Thought to Be Caused By Demons, What Do We Know About Epilepsy Today? http://wnpr.org/post/once-thought-be-caused-demons-what-do-we-know-about-epilepsy-today <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Historically, people with epilepsy were thought to be possessed by demons. Research has come a long way since then, but epilepsy remains mysterious. </span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that one in 26 people will be diagnosed with epilepsy in their lives. Annually, it costs more than $15 billion in medical costs and reduced work production.</span></p><p> Mon, 05 May 2014 13:00:00 +0000 John Dankosky, Tucker Ives, Lydia Brown & Catie Talarski 21179 at http://wnpr.org Once Thought to Be Caused By Demons, What Do We Know About Epilepsy Today? Study Links Casual Pot Use With Brain Abnormalities http://wnpr.org/post/study-links-casual-pot-use-brain-abnormalities Young adults who smoke marijuana at least once a week showed changes in the size and shape of two key brain regions, according to a new study of 20 pot smokers and 20 non-pot smokers between 18 and 25.<p>This is the first time recreational marijuana use has been connected to significant brain changes.<p>The findings, a collaboration between Northwestern University and Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, were published in The Journal of Neuroscience.<p>The senior author of the study, <strong>Hans Breiter</strong>, joins <em><a href="http://hereandnow.wbur.org/">Here & Now&#82 Wed, 16 Apr 2014 17:42:06 +0000 editor 20252 at http://wnpr.org Study Links Casual Pot Use With Brain Abnormalities Early Childhood Autism Treatment Is Key, But Diagnosis Is Difficult http://wnpr.org/post/early-childhood-autism-treatment-key-diagnosis-difficult <p>Most children with autism are well past their fourth birthday by the time they’re diagnosed with the condition, according to new government data.</p><p>Their parents and teachers may have raised red flags earlier, but it takes months or years to confirm suspicions with a formal diagnosis. And therapy rarely starts without one.</p><p> Mon, 14 Apr 2014 14:02:54 +0000 Karen Weintraub 20109 at http://wnpr.org Early Childhood Autism Treatment Is Key, But Diagnosis Is Difficult How Yale Scientists Are Trying to Read Minds http://wnpr.org/post/how-yale-scientists-are-trying-read-minds <p>New research out of Yale University is claiming clairvoyance. It's called "neuroimaging," a fancy way of saying scientists are reading your mind.</p><p> Thu, 10 Apr 2014 14:09:24 +0000 Patrick Skahill 19873 at http://wnpr.org How Yale Scientists Are Trying to Read Minds Criminologist Believes Violent Behavior Is Biological http://wnpr.org/post/criminologist-believes-violent-behavior-biological <em>This interview originally aired on <a href="http://www.npr.org/2013/05/01/180096559/criminologist-believes-violent-behavior-is-biological" target="_blank">April 30, 2013</a>.</em><p>Twenty years ago, when brain imaging made it possible for researchers to study the minds of violent criminals and compare them to the brain imaging of "normal" people, a whole new field of research — neurocriminology — opened up.<p>Adrian Raine was the first person to conduct a brain imaging study on murderers and has since continued to study the brains of violent criminals and psychopaths. Fri, 21 Mar 2014 14:13:00 +0000 editor 18809 at http://wnpr.org Criminologist Believes Violent Behavior Is Biological Sriracha Chemistry: How Hot Sauces Perk Up Your Food And Your Mood http://wnpr.org/post/sriracha-chemistry-how-hot-sauces-perk-your-food-and-your-mood <p>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2DJN0gnuI8</p> Tue, 25 Feb 2014 00:55:00 +0000 editor 17496 at http://wnpr.org Sriracha Chemistry: How Hot Sauces Perk Up Your Food And Your Mood Less Sleep, More Time Online Raise Risk For Teen Depression http://wnpr.org/post/less-sleep-more-time-online-amp-teen-depression-risk The teenage years are a tumultuous time, with about 11 percent developing depression by age 18. Lack of sleep may increase teenagers' risk of depression, two studies say.<p>Teenagers who don't get enough sleep are four times as likely to develop <a href="http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/depression-in-children-and-adolescents/index.shtml">major depressive disorder</a> as their peers who sleep more, according to researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston. Thu, 06 Feb 2014 15:29:00 +0000 editor 16562 at http://wnpr.org Less Sleep, More Time Online Raise Risk For Teen Depression Our Brains Rewrite Our Memories, Putting Present In The Past http://wnpr.org/post/our-brains-rewrite-our-memories-putting-present-past Think about your fifth-birthday party. Maybe your mom carried the cake. What did her face look like? If you have a hard time imagining the way she looked then rather than how she looks now, you're not alone.<p>The brain edits memories relentlessly, updating the past with new information. Scientists say that this isn't a question of having a bad memory. Wed, 05 Feb 2014 19:22:12 +0000 editor 16516 at http://wnpr.org Our Brains Rewrite Our Memories, Putting Present In The Past Watkinson Extended Play: Using Music as Medicine http://wnpr.org/post/watkinson-extended-play-using-music-medicine <p>There is nothing particularly new about the idea that music can be a palliative or a distraction from pain or physical discomfort associated with illness. But over the last 25 years or so, we’ve seen a rising tide of interest in some that lies well beyond that -- a frontier where music’s actual therapeutic and even, curative powers can be discovered. Wed, 29 Jan 2014 15:50:35 +0000 Chion Wolf, Colin McEnroe & Betsy Kaplan 16127 at http://wnpr.org Watkinson Extended Play: Using Music as Medicine The Healing Power of Music: Colin McEnroe at Watkinson School http://wnpr.org/post/healing-power-music-colin-mcenroe-watkinson-school <p>A lot of interconnected things were happening in the 1990s, an oncologist and hematologist&nbsp; named Mitchell Gaynor discovered trough a Tibetan monk, the so-called singing bowls and began incorporating them into the guided meditation and breathing work he did with his patients. Wed, 29 Jan 2014 15:45:06 +0000 Chion Wolf, Colin McEnroe & Betsy Kaplan 16110 at http://wnpr.org The Healing Power of Music: Colin McEnroe at Watkinson School Albert Einstein: Inside the Brain of a Genius http://wnpr.org/post/albert-einstein-inside-brain-genius <p>In 1905, a young German physicist proposed an equation that would forever change our perception of special relativity. His name was Albert Einstein and his equation was E = MC<super>2</super>.&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">Over a century later, Einstein’s theory of relativity still stands as one of science’s greatest achievements. It established Einstein as one of the </span>20th-century’s<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> greatest celebrities, and one of history’s greatest thinkers.</span></p><p> Fri, 24 Jan 2014 14:00:00 +0000 John Dankosky, Lydia Brown, Tucker Ives & Catie Talarski 15839 at http://wnpr.org Albert Einstein: Inside the Brain of a Genius Was Adam Lanza a Psychopath? http://wnpr.org/post/was-adam-lanza-psychopath <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Neuroscientist James Fallon&nbsp;</span><a href="http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/science/2013/11/the-neuroscientist-who-discovered-he-was-a-psychopath/" style="line-height: 1.5;">found something shocking&nbsp;</a><span style="line-height: 1.5;">when he was looking at brain scans of serial killers for research, and brain scans of his family for signs of disease. According to the scan, his own brain was no different than that of a psychopath. The discovery opened up a new world of research,</span><a href="http://www.ted.com/talks/jim_fallon_exploring_the_mind_of_a_killer.html" style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;TED talks&nbsp;</a><span style="line-height: 1.5;">and his recent book,&nbsp;</span><em style="line-height: 1.5;">The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist’s Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain.&nbsp;</em></p><p> Fri, 03 Jan 2014 21:00:10 +0000 Catie Talarski 14915 at http://wnpr.org Was Adam Lanza a Psychopath? An Asbestos Scandal Reaches Yale; The Mind of a Psychopath http://wnpr.org/post/asbestos-scandal-reaches-yale-mind-psychopath <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">This hour, we talk with neuroscientist James Fallon. </span><a href="http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/science/2013/11/the-neuroscientist-who-discovered-he-was-a-psychopath/" style="line-height: 1.5;">He found something shocking </a><span style="line-height: 1.5;">when he was looking at brain scans of serial killers. We’ll talk about his book</span><em style="line-height: 1.5;"> The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist’s Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain </em><span style="line-height: 1.5;">and what his research might tell us about Sandy Hook shooter Adam </span>Lanza<span style="line-height: 1.5;">.</span></p><p> Thu, 02 Jan 2014 14:00:00 +0000 Catie Talarski, Tucker Ives & John Dankosky 14842 at http://wnpr.org An Asbestos Scandal Reaches Yale; The Mind of a Psychopath Concussions May Increase Alzheimer's Risk, But Only For Some http://wnpr.org/post/concussions-may-increase-alzheimers-risk-only-some Doctors have long suspected that head trauma boosts the risk of getting Alzheimer's disease later on, but the evidence on that has been mixed.<p>But it looks like people who have memory problems and a history of concussion are more likely to have a buildup of plaques in the brain that are a risk factor for Alzheimer's, according to researchers at the Mayo Clinic.<p>But there were also people in the study who had had concussions and who didn't have <a href="http://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/publication/part-2-what-happens-brain-ad/hallmarks-ad">amyloid plaques </a>in their brains. Fri, 27 Dec 2013 18:00:00 +0000 Nancy Shute 14598 at http://wnpr.org Concussions May Increase Alzheimer's Risk, But Only For Some Daniel Goleman in Focus http://wnpr.org/post/daniel-goleman-focus <p>Psychologist and former New York Times reporter&nbsp;<a href="http://www.danielgoleman.info/" title="http://www.danielgoleman.info/">Daniel&nbsp;Goleman</a>&nbsp;presented us with an important idea - “Emotional Intelligence” - it challenges the old concept of IQ as the most important measure of one’s abilities.</p><div>But his newest research might be even more important for our current world - filled with multiple screens and distractions. It’s all about “Focus.”</div><p> Mon, 16 Dec 2013 14:00:00 +0000 Catie Talarski, Tucker Ives & John Dankosky 14018 at http://wnpr.org Daniel Goleman in Focus Healthful Habits Can Help Induce Sleep Without The Pills http://wnpr.org/post/healthy-habits-can-help-induce-sleep-without-pills About one-third of American adults say they have problems falling asleep. And prescriptions for sleeping medications are on the rise, with about 4 percent of people using the drugs, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.<p>But sleep specialists say people should exercise caution before deciding to take medication to help them sleep.<p>Take the case of Nancy Sherman, a woman in her 60s who lives in Seattle. Sleepless nights started about four years ago when she lived directly above an "end of the line" bus stop. Mon, 16 Dec 2013 07:45:00 +0000 Patti Neighmond 14007 at http://wnpr.org Healthful Habits Can Help Induce Sleep Without The Pills Ainissa Ramirez and the Science Behind America's Game http://wnpr.org/post/ainissa-ramirez-and-science-behind-americas-game <p>We’ve spent a lot of time talking about the <a href="http://www.yourpublicmedia.org/content/wnpr/changing-science-concussion">epidemic of injury in the game of football</a> - concussions and traumatic brain injuries… but have you ever asked yourself why football helmets are designed the way they are? And how better helmet design might actually have made the game more dangerous? And while you’re at it, have you considered “the divine randomness of prolate spheroid?” That’s science talk for the unlikely evolution for the shape of the football. &nbsp;</p> Thu, 05 Dec 2013 14:00:00 +0000 Catie Talarski, Tucker Ives & John Dankosky 9403 at http://wnpr.org Ainissa Ramirez and the Science Behind America's Game New Yale Study Looks at Oxytocin and the Autistic Brain http://wnpr.org/post/new-yale-study-looks-oxytocin-and-autistic-brain <p>A new Yale study offers hope for parents who have children with autism spectrum disorders.&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">Published in the <em>Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences</em>, the double-blind, placebo-controlled study consisted of 17 children and adolescents considered to have moderate- to high-functioning autism.&nbsp;</span></p><p> Tue, 03 Dec 2013 21:56:47 +0000 Ray Hardman 13360 at http://wnpr.org New Yale Study Looks at Oxytocin and the Autistic Brain Middle-Age "Senior Moments" Just Part of Aging http://wnpr.org/post/middle-age-senior-moments-just-part-aging <p>Everyone occasionally struggles to remember a name, blanks out on an appointment or forgets why they walked into the other room. But somewhere around age 40, those “senior moments” start to take on a new seriousness. They suddenly seem like scary signs of aging, perhaps harbingers of major memory loss to come.</p><p> Wed, 27 Nov 2013 18:35:17 +0000 Karen Weintraub 13101 at http://wnpr.org Middle-Age "Senior Moments" Just Part of Aging