research http://wnpr.org en Study Links Casual Pot Use With Brain Abnormalities http://wnpr.org/post/study-links-casual-pot-use-brain-abnormalities Young adults who smoke marijuana at least once a week showed changes in the size and shape of two key brain regions, according to a new study of 20 pot smokers and 20 non-pot smokers between 18 and 25.<p>This is the first time recreational marijuana use has been connected to significant brain changes.<p>The findings, a collaboration between Northwestern University and Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, were published in The Journal of Neuroscience.<p>The senior author of the study, <strong>Hans Breiter</strong>, joins <em><a href="http://hereandnow.wbur.org/">Here & Now&#82 Wed, 16 Apr 2014 17:42:06 +0000 editor 20252 at http://wnpr.org Study Links Casual Pot Use With Brain Abnormalities Progress Reported On Casino Impact Research Project http://wnpr.org/post/progress-reported-casino-impact-research-project Thousands of Massachusetts residents are being surveyed as part of multi-year, multi-million dollar research project on the social and economic impacts of introducing casino gambling to the state.<img class="wysiwyg-asset-image-wrapper inset" data-caption="" data-attribution="Credit Triin Q&#039;s photostream Flickr" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://mediad.publicbroadcasting.net/p/wamc/files/styles/card_280/public/201301/casino_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><a href="http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wamc/audio/2014/04/casinoresearch.mp3" class="asset-audio"></a><p>The members of the UMass Amherst led research team sa Wed, 16 Apr 2014 16:04:18 +0000 Paul Tuthill 20243 at http://wnpr.org Progress Reported On Casino Impact Research Project A T. Rex Treks To Washington For A Shot At Fame http://wnpr.org/post/t-rex-reveal-itself-smithsonian This week, scientists at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History will start unpacking some rare and precious cargo. It's something the Smithsonian has never had before — a nearly complete skeleton of a Tyrannosaurus rex.<p>Most people don't know it, but the T. rex that's standing tall in the Natural History Museum in Washington, D.C., is a fake — a cast, a copy of the bones. It's an accurate replica, but for decades the Smithsonian has coveted a real skeleton of a T. Wed, 16 Apr 2014 07:43:00 +0000 Christopher Joyce 20218 at http://wnpr.org A T. Rex Treks To Washington For A Shot At Fame How Yale Scientists Are Trying to Read Minds http://wnpr.org/post/how-yale-scientists-are-trying-read-minds <p>New research out of Yale University is claiming clairvoyance. It's called "neuroimaging," a fancy way of saying scientists are reading your mind.</p><p> Thu, 10 Apr 2014 14:09:24 +0000 Patrick Skahill 19873 at http://wnpr.org How Yale Scientists Are Trying to Read Minds Sizing Up Your Children Is A Tricky Business http://wnpr.org/post/sizing-your-children-tricky-business When I had a second baby earlier this year, my three-year-old suddenly seemed <em>enormous</em>. "Check out the size of those feet!" I marveled. She seemed so heavy, so tall, so substantial.<p>She even seemed more capable, more robust. Images of airborne cookware and toppling bookshelves faded. The staircase didn't seem quite so treacherous. Mon, 07 Apr 2014 18:36:55 +0000 Tania Lombrozo 19721 at http://wnpr.org Sizing Up Your Children Is A Tricky Business Smoking Rates Decline in Connecticut, But Striking Disparities Persist By County http://wnpr.org/post/smoking-rates-decline-connecticut-striking-disparities-persist-county <p>Although smoking rates in Connecticut decreased between 1996 and 2012, striking disparities persist among counties, <a href="http://viz.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/us-health-map/" target="_blank">according to new research from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington</a>.</p><p> Thu, 03 Apr 2014 18:59:03 +0000 Magaly Olivero 19539 at http://wnpr.org Smoking Rates Decline in Connecticut, But Striking Disparities Persist By County Changing The Face Of Astronomy Research http://wnpr.org/post/changing-face-astronomy-research Shooting for the stars is expensive.<p>Advanced sciences like astronomy require years of study and graduate degrees. Wed, 02 Apr 2014 12:55:00 +0000 editor 19437 at http://wnpr.org Changing The Face Of Astronomy Research Report: New England Should Develop Locally-Grown Food System http://wnpr.org/post/report-new-england-should-develop-locally-grown-food-system <p>A <a href="http://action.clf.org/site/Survey?ACTION_REQUIRED=URI_ACTION_USER_REQUESTS&amp;SURVEY_ID=4340" target="_blank">new report on sustainable agriculture policy recommends that New England build its own regional food system</a> with locally-grown products. Cris Coffin, New England director of the <a href="http://www.farmland.org/" target="_blank">American Farmland Trust</a>, a co-author of the study, said consumers in the region want to buy local.<span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;</span></p><p> Tue, 01 Apr 2014 17:16:24 +0000 Diane Orson 19381 at http://wnpr.org Report: New England Should Develop Locally-Grown Food System Climate Report Warns of 'Severe' and 'Irreversible Impacts' http://wnpr.org/post/climate-report-warns-severe-and-irreversible-impacts The United Nation&#8217;s <a href="http://www.ipcc.ch/" target="_blank">International Panel on Climate Change</a> released its fifth report on climate change today.<p>The report details recent impacts of climate-related extremes such as wildfires, droughts and floods and predicts the vulnerability of human and natural resources, including a stress on crops and water resources.<p><strong>Noah Diffenbaugh</strong>, <strong></strong>climate scientist at<strong> </strong>Stanford University and one of the co-authors of the IPCC report, joins <em><a href="http://hereandnow.wbur.org">Here & Now&#821 Mon, 31 Mar 2014 20:17:00 +0000 editor 19350 at http://wnpr.org Climate Report Warns of 'Severe' and 'Irreversible Impacts' U.N. Report Raises Climate Change Warning, Points To Opportunities http://wnpr.org/post/un-report-raises-climate-change-warning-points-opportunities "The effects of climate change are already occurring on all continents and across the oceans," and the world is mostly "ill-prepared" for the risks that the sweeping changes present, <a href="http://ipcc.ch/pdf/ar5/pr_wg2/140330_pr_wgII_spm_en.pdf" target="_blank">a new report from the U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concludes</a>.<p>The report also wastes no time in pointing a finger toward who is responsible: "Human interference with the climate system is occurring," reads the first sentence <a href="http://ipcc-wg2.gov/AR5/images/uploads/IPCC_WG2AR5_SPM_Approved.pdf" target Mon, 31 Mar 2014 11:15:00 +0000 Mark Memmott 19311 at http://wnpr.org U.N. Report Raises Climate Change Warning, Points To Opportunities Rethinking Fat: The Case For Adding Some Into Your Diet http://wnpr.org/post/rethinking-fat-case-adding-some-your-diet Remember the fat-free boom that swept the country in the 1990s? Yes, we know from the Salt readers who took our informal <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/03/22/292389447/remember-fat-free-mania-take-our-survey">survey</a> that lots of you tried to follow it. And gave up.<p>"I definitely remember eating fat-free cookies, fat–free pudding, fat-free cheese, which was awful," Elizabeth Stafford, an attorney from North Carolina, told us in the survey.<p>Back then, she avoided all kinds of foods with fat: cheese, eggs, meat, even nuts and avocados. Mon, 31 Mar 2014 07:31:00 +0000 editor 19306 at http://wnpr.org Rethinking Fat: The Case For Adding Some Into Your Diet Physics 101: Why Did the Universe Blow Up? http://wnpr.org/post/physics-101-why-did-universe-blow <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Recent observations of so-called "gravitational waves" are providing astronomers with the strongest confirmation yet of cosmic inflation, a theory that says the universe rapidly expanded following the Big Bang. </span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Why, exactly, did the universe balloon by 100 trillion trillion times, in less than the blink of an eye, 13.8 billion years ago?</span></p><p> Tue, 25 Mar 2014 18:29:32 +0000 Patrick Skahill 19004 at http://wnpr.org Physics 101: Why Did the Universe Blow Up? Kids Benefit From Counseling At The Pediatrician's Office http://wnpr.org/post/kids-benefit-counseling-pediatricians-office Pediatricians often recommend some mental health counseling for children who have behavior problems like defiance and tantrums. But counseling can be hard to find. Children are much more likely to get help if the counselor is right there in the doctor's office, a study finds.<p>The children in the study had behavior problems, and many also had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or anxiety. They were 8 years old, on average, and two-thirds were boys.<p>Half of the 321 children were referred to outside counselors who took the family's insurance. Mon, 24 Mar 2014 18:03:00 +0000 editor 18936 at http://wnpr.org Kids Benefit From Counseling At The Pediatrician's Office Cancer Treatments Could Hurt Your Heart http://wnpr.org/post/cancer-treatments-could-hurt-your-heart <p>Heart disease is the leading cause of death for cancer survivors. A relatively new scientific field called "cardio-oncology" is working to change that.</p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Chemotherapy and radiation may save you from cancer, but they can also do a lot of damage to your heart.&nbsp;</span></p><p> Wed, 19 Mar 2014 12:07:00 +0000 Patrick Skahill 18653 at http://wnpr.org Cancer Treatments Could Hurt Your Heart Scientists Announce A Big-Bang Breakthrough http://wnpr.org/post/scientists-announce-big-bang-breakthrough <strong>This post was update at 4:00 p.m. ET.</strong><p>Researchers say they've <a href="http://spaceref.com/astronomy/first-direct-evidence-of-cosmic-inflation.html">discovered that gravitational waves rippled through the fabric of space-time</a> in the first sliver of a second after the Big Bang — the first direct evidence for a mysterious, ultrarapid expansion at the dawn of the universe. Mon, 17 Mar 2014 17:16:00 +0000 Scott Neuman 18562 at http://wnpr.org Scientists Announce A Big-Bang Breakthrough Rare Diamond Points To Mass Quantities Of Water In Earth's Mantle http://wnpr.org/post/rare-diamond-points-mass-quantities-water-earths-mantle Impurities found in <a href="http://news.ualberta.ca/newsarticles/2014/march/rare-mineral-points-to-vast-oceans-beneath-the-earth">a pea-sized diamond that came from the (very) deep</a> have bolstered evidence for a vast "wet zone" in the Earth's mantle, scientists publishing in the <a href="http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v507/n7491/full/nature13080.html">latest issue of Nature</a> say.<p>The 'ultradeep' diamond, which weighs less than one-tenth of a gram, was found on the surface a decade ago by a Brazilian prospector. Fri, 14 Mar 2014 11:22:16 +0000 Scott Neuman 18420 at http://wnpr.org What's In A Name? http://wnpr.org/post/whats-name-0 <p><span style="font-family: verdana, helvetica, arial, sans-serif; line-height: normal;">Just last week, a Tennessee judge ruled that&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-0819-abcarian-messiah-20130819,0,6232746.story" style="font-family: verdana, helvetica, arial, sans-serif; line-height: normal; color: black; font-weight: bold;" title=":http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-0819-abcarian-messiah-20130819,0,6232746.story">the parents of a baby boy they named “Messiah,”</a><span style="font-family: verdana, helvetica, arial, sans-serif; line-height: normal;">&nbsp;mu Thu, 06 Mar 2014 14:00:00 +0000 John Dankosky, Lydia Brown, Tucker Ives, Catie Talarski & Heather Brandon 17980 at http://wnpr.org What's In A Name? Could Tarantula Venom Cure Your Aches and Pains? http://wnpr.org/post/could-tarantula-venom-cure-your-aches-and-pains <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Spider venom could be the next big thing to cure pain, according to research reported in the March issue of </span><em style="line-height: 1.5;">Current Biology&nbsp;</em><span style="line-height: 1.5;">from Yale University.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">There are a lot of different components in venom. And here’s a cheery thought: not every part is out to kill you.&nbsp;</span></p><p> Wed, 05 Mar 2014 16:43:55 +0000 Patrick Skahill 17924 at http://wnpr.org Could Tarantula Venom Cure Your Aches and Pains? Mammogram Uncertainty Gives Patients, Doctors More Reason To Talk http://wnpr.org/post/mammogram-uncertainty-gives-patients-doctors-more-reason-talk I am 51 years old and have had a yearly mammogram, more or less, since the age of 40.<p>I got them despite the fact that there is no history of breast cancer in my family. I did it because that was what my doctor and others, including the American Cancer Society, recommended.<p>Three years ago, I was diagnosed with invasive <a href="http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/breast/healthprofessional/page4">ductal carcinoma in situ</a> breast cancer after a screening mammogram. I underwent a mastectomy and chemotherapy. Mon, 24 Feb 2014 20:46:00 +0000 Madhulika Sikka 17485 at http://wnpr.org Mammogram Uncertainty Gives Patients, Doctors More Reason To Talk Orphans' Lonely Beginnings Reveal How Parents Shape A Child's Brain http://wnpr.org/post/orphans-lonely-beginnings-reveal-how-parents-shape-childs-brain Parents do a lot more than make sure a child has food and shelter, researchers say. They play a critical role in brain development.<p>More than a decade of research on children raised in institutions shows that "neglect is awful for the brain," says <a href="http://dms.hms.harvard.edu/neuroscience/fac/Nelson.php">Charles Nelson</a>, a professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children's Hospital. Mon, 24 Feb 2014 08:35:00 +0000 Jon Hamilton 17438 at http://wnpr.org Orphans' Lonely Beginnings Reveal How Parents Shape A Child's Brain Johnson and Johnson to Share Massive Amounts of Clinical Trial Data http://wnpr.org/post/johnson-and-johnson-share-massive-amounts-clinical-trial-data <p>Drug companies like operating in the shadows, but a recent move by Johnson and Johnson may change all that. In collaboration with Yale University's <span style="line-height: 1.5;">Open Data Access Project (YODA), the pharmaceutical giant will now share its clinical trial data with researchers.&nbsp;</span></p><p> Mon, 17 Feb 2014 12:08:00 +0000 Patrick Skahill 16995 at http://wnpr.org Johnson and Johnson to Share Massive Amounts of Clinical Trial Data Living With Multiple Sclerosis http://wnpr.org/post/living-multiple-sclerosis <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p><p>The actresses Teri Garr and Annette Funicello, the television hosts Montel Williams and Neil Cavuto, the writer Joan Didion, Ann Romney, the wife of the presidential candidate Mitt Romney, the comedian Richard Pryor. These are some of the people that you quote-unquote know that have, or in Pryor's case had, Multiple Sclerosis.</p><p> Wed, 12 Feb 2014 16:46:21 +0000 Colin McEnroe, Betsy Kaplan & Chion Wolf 16875 at http://wnpr.org Living With Multiple Sclerosis 'Lung In A Box' Keeps Organs Breathing Before Transplants http://wnpr.org/post/lung-box-keeps-organs-breathing-transplants <p>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fwd32Xa3uwc</p> Mon, 10 Feb 2014 19:20:00 +0000 editor 16761 at http://wnpr.org 'Lung In A Box' Keeps Organs Breathing Before Transplants Are Hospital Stays Getting Safer? http://wnpr.org/post/are-hospital-stays-getting-safer <p>A <a href="http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMsa1300991" target="_blank">new study published in <em>The New England Journal of Medicine</em></a> says that hospital stays may be getting safer, at least if you're admitted for a heart condition.&nbsp;</p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Researchers used medical record data for more than 61,000 patients from 2005 to 2011. They studied more than 20 common problems patients typically encounter after admission to a hospital -- things like drug reactions, bed sores, and infection.</span></p><p> Wed, 05 Feb 2014 21:14:12 +0000 Patrick Skahill 16509 at http://wnpr.org Are Hospital Stays Getting Safer? Our Brains Rewrite Our Memories, Putting Present In The Past http://wnpr.org/post/our-brains-rewrite-our-memories-putting-present-past Think about your fifth-birthday party. Maybe your mom carried the cake. What did her face look like? If you have a hard time imagining the way she looked then rather than how she looks now, you're not alone.<p>The brain edits memories relentlessly, updating the past with new information. Scientists say that this isn't a question of having a bad memory. Wed, 05 Feb 2014 19:22:12 +0000 editor 16516 at http://wnpr.org Our Brains Rewrite Our Memories, Putting Present In The Past An Artificial Arm Gives One Man The Chance To Feel Again http://wnpr.org/post/artificial-arm-gives-one-man-chance-feel-again <p>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QtPs8d4JbwY</p> Wed, 05 Feb 2014 19:22:00 +0000 Rob Stein 16514 at http://wnpr.org An Artificial Arm Gives One Man The Chance To Feel Again Over-the-Counter Drugs: A Prescription for Confusion http://wnpr.org/post/over-counter-drugs-prescription-confusion <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">At Able Care Pharmacy and Medical Supplies in Enfield, </span>Ashraf<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> </span>Moustafa<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> often tries to avert disasters involving drugs displayed on his store’s shelves.&nbsp;</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Moustafa, the pharmacy manager, recently spoke to an elderly woman seeking ways to treat dark blue patches on her arms. Instead of suggesting any remedies, he asked the woman what medicines she was taking, and discovered that she was dangerously mixing over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs with aspirin and the prescription blood thinner&nbsp;</span>Plavix<span style="line-height: 1.5;">. He sent the woman to the hospital, fearing that she was suffering from internal bleeding.</span></p><p>“People have the impression that if a drug is approved for over-the-counter use, then it must be much safer than prescription medicine,” Moustafa says. “That’s when trouble happens.”</p><p> Mon, 03 Feb 2014 21:09:24 +0000 Rochelle Sharpe 16407 at http://wnpr.org Over-the-Counter Drugs: A Prescription for Confusion Popular Testosterone Therapy May Raise Risk Of Heart Attack http://wnpr.org/post/popular-testosterone-therapy-may-raise-risk-heart-attack There's new evidence that widely prescribed testosterone drugs — touted for men with flagging libidos and general listlessness — might increase the risk of heart attacks.<p>A <a href="http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0085805">study</a> of more than 55,000 men found a doubling of heart attack risk among testosterone users older than 65, compared with men who didn't take the drug.<p>The research was inspired by a <a href="http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1000485#t=articleResults">smaller study</a> published in 2010 that hinted at an elevated risk among frail, older men who were Thu, 30 Jan 2014 15:13:00 +0000 Richard Knox 16205 at http://wnpr.org Popular Testosterone Therapy May Raise Risk Of Heart Attack Video Games Aim to Reduce Risky Behavior Among Teens, Young Adults http://wnpr.org/post/video-games-aim-reduce-risky-behavior-among-teens-young-adults <p>Women’s health is the next frontier for a team of medical researchers at Yale who believe video games can be powerful tools in the fight against HIV and other serious diseases.</p><p class="p1">For the last several years, Yale’s Play2Prevent lab has been a hub of collaboration between doctors and computer programmers testing the capacity of games to educate users and, perhaps, even change risky behavior. Their work is part of a fast-growing movement in public health to better understand how virtual gaming environments can improve players’ lives in the real world.</p> Wed, 29 Jan 2014 22:39:18 +0000 Meg Heckman 16181 at http://wnpr.org Video Games Aim to Reduce Risky Behavior Among Teens, Young Adults In Rebuilding Reserve Funds, Where Does Connecticut Stand? http://wnpr.org/post/rebuilding-reserve-funds-where-does-connecticut-stand <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Last year, The Pew Charitable Trusts </span><a href="http://www.pewstates.org/research/data-visualizations/fiscal-50-state-trends-and-analysis-85899523649#ind5" style="line-height: 1.5;">analyzed the fiscal data for all 50 states</a><span style="line-height: 1.5;">. They used several markers to rank the states, including the amount of money in reserve funds, sometimes known as rainy day funds.&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Connecticut’s rainy day fund is among the lowest in the nation. The highest? Alaska.</span></p><p>This hour, we find out how states like Alaska got so far ahead, while Connecticut fell so far behind.</p><p> Tue, 28 Jan 2014 12:54:50 +0000 John Dankosky, Tucker Ives, Lydia Brown & Catie Talarski 16069 at http://wnpr.org In Rebuilding Reserve Funds, Where Does Connecticut Stand?