Coming Up on WNPR

January 19 to 23, 2015

MONDAY: King’s Last March (special program)
Although it was one of the most challenging and controversial chapters of his career, the final year of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s life has not been the focus of significant public attention. This dramatic and illuminating documentary uses a rich mix of archival tape, oral histories, and contemporary interviews to paint a vivid picture of what may have been the most difficult year of King's life.

TUESDAY: Sizzling Space Spectacular (rebroadcast)
When it comes to space, there’s a lot to be excited about. Telescopes are scanning the farthest reaches of our galaxy, and we’re learning more than ever before about the origins of planets. Astronomers are asking the age-old question, “Are we alone?” and scientists are unraveling the mysteries of dark matter. This hour, we talk exciting news in space with a panel of three scientists.

WEDNESDAY: The Wheelhouse
Colin McEnroe guest-hosts our weekly news roundtable.

THURSDAY: What’s Next for Cassandra C?
The story of Cassandra C, 17, dominated national headlines after she refused treatment for a curable cancer. The Connecticut Supreme Court agreed with a lower court decision that DCF can retain temporary custody of the girl, and force her to undergo chemotherapy. WNPR’s Lucy Nalpathanchil guest-hosts as we talk with Cassandra's attorney about next steps for her. We also talk with medical experts about informed consent. Should Cassandra be forced to undergo treatment? We check in with how other states handled similar cases.

FRIDAY: The Young and the Restless in Connecticut (rebroadcast)
More young people are moving to the heart of cities, according to a report from think tank City Observatory. The number of college-educated people moving to city centers has surged, up 37 percent since 2000, even while their populations have shrunk slightly. What’s behind that trend, and is it happening in Connecticut? We take a look at the Hartford region, which made a list of places making modest gains in attracting college-educated young people. 

January 19 to 23, 2015

MONDAY: The Children of Children Keep Coming (special program)
Through story and song, author Russell Goings has adapted his epic poem “The Children of Children Keep Coming” into an hour-long spoken word performance that delineates and celebrates the too-often-unsung African American cultural history.

TUESDAY: The Scramble
Our Monday Scramble moves back a day because of the holiday. We recap the big news, events, and discussions of the weekend.

WEDNESDAY: Can a Song Change the World?
From a panel taped at Watkinson School: Folksinger, recording artist and former state troubadour Lara Herscovitch and rap poet Self Suffice lead a panel that tracks the relationship between music and social change, from Woody Guthrie to Pete Seeger to Talib Kweli.

THURSDAY: Gastromusicology
Hartt Professor Ira Braus joins us to talk about his book “Classical Cooks,” which explores the link between musical and culinary taste. We learn about the relationship that composers had with food, and the impact that food had on their musical output. Were some of your favorite symphonies and operas inspired by some fatty meats or tasty sweets? Join us to find out.

FRIDAY: The Nose
Our weekly cultural roundtable. 

January 19 to 23, 2015

MONDAY: TBA (special program)

TUESDAY: Ten Tips About Weight Loss That Aren't True
Want to lose weight? Ten tips about weight loss that are not true, from metabolic doctor Reza Yavari. For instance, a calorie is a calorie is a calorie. Dead wrong, according to the latest research. Don't miss this one, for health or aesthetics.

WEDNESDAY: The Food Schmooze
School of Fish is an all-encompassing culinary education in one handy -- not to mention gorgeously photographed -- cookbook. Ben Pollinger, executive chef of upscale Manhattan restaurant Oceana, distills years of experience working in some of the world’s best restaurants in this no-nonsense book that demystifies the art of cooking seafood. Pollinger joins the Food Schmooze® gang to talk about his new comprehensive guide to cooking fish, for home cooks of all skill levels.

THURSDAY: Titles
A look at what lies beneath the titles we use to describe ourselves. Doctor, attorney, Mrs., chef, administrative assistant—why do we really use them? What are they meant to convey—obviously or secretly. Why was Faith's college faculty friend annoyed by honorary doctorates?

SATURDAY: The Food Schmooze (rebroadcast)
School of Fish is an all-encompassing culinary education in one handy -- not to mention gorgeously photographed -- cookbook. Ben Pollinger, executive chef of upscale Manhattan restaurant Oceana, distills years of experience working in some of the world’s best restaurants in this no-nonsense book that demystifies the art of cooking seafood. Pollinger joins the Food Schmooze® gang to talk about his new comprehensive guide to cooking fish, for home cooks of all skill levels.