Coming Up on WNPR

September 29 - October 3, 2014

MONDAY: From Suburbs to Cities: Design for a Better Future (rebroadcast)
In her first book The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream is Moving, author Leigh Gallagher observes a growing trend in America'’s housing landscape: fewer people are choosing to live in suburbs. This hour, Leigh joins us to explain some of the forces driving Americans out of suburbia, and give us a glimpse of what the post-cul-de-sac future might look like. Later in the show, we talk to some Michigan researchers about the future of urban design in North America’s largest megaregion and hear from a local professor whose new study takes a closer look at the relationship between street design and public health.

TUESDAY: Inside Common Core; a Revived Musical Career
The common core has been a big part of this year’s campaign for governor -- and a rallying cry for teachers, parents and students. But in the radio documentary Greater Expectations: The Challenge of the Common Core, producer Emily Hanford looks at what’s really in the Common Core that might provide some common ground between many sides on the education reform debate. Also, WNPR producer Lori Mack gives us a story of a musical career that’'s been revived after decades. A story about an unlikely fan base, some high school students...and even a Dave Brubeck connection.

WEDNESDAY: The Wheelhouse
Our weekly news roundtable.

THURSDAY: The History and Methodology of Opinion Polling
Every day, we hear about a new poll that'’s taken a look at the public’'s stance on a current political, social, or economic issue. But how are these polls carried out? And how accurate are they? On this episode of Where We Live, we'’ll talk to some poll experts about the methodology of opinion polling. We'’ll also learn a bit about when opinion polls first took off in the United States.

FRIDAY: Ag Gag Laws; Preserving Connecticut'’s Farms
A recent forum at the Yale Law School opened conversation about the nation'’s ‘agricultural gag laws’. On this episode of Where We Live, we'’ll continue that conversation. We’'ll also take a look at Connecticut’'s rich farm history and some recent efforts to preserve it.

September 29 - October 3 , 2014

MONDAY: The Scramble
The Scramble is back with Ben Naddaff-Hafrey, musician and music editor at MIC news. He’s excited to be our SuperGuest, after first joining us several months back to talk about Bob Dylan’s Super Bowl commercials. We loved him then and we think you’ll love him now. He’s got some great ideas percolating to share with you-- the perils and promise of new media/social journalism, the new U2 album as a paradigm shifting moment in how we think about music, tech and their respective industries, and the history of the War of the World broadcast and its influence on how we think about psychology and media now. As always, we also bring you the latest news from the weekend.

TUESDAY: Dancing the Night Away: Connecticut Dance Halls
We’ve wanted to produce a show on Thrall Hall for several months and we’re finally ready to do it. We’ll share the poignant story of Windsor resident Ed Thrall’s effort to build a square dance hall as a place for his daughter to have fun. Ed spent decades meticulously building his exquisite dance hall from scraps of building materials recovered from the demolition of Hartford buildings bulldozed in the urban renewal programs of the 1960’s.  Most of all, it was a source of pride and love for Ed. But, the story took a dark turn when Ed and the town of Windsor clashed over zoning regulations that thwarted Ed’s dreams, straining relationships between Ed, his family and the town. Executive Producer Catie Talarski, shares this heartbreaking story of lost dreams, betrayal, and redemption. Next, we explore the legacy of Connecticut’s Shaboo Inn, a legendary 1970’s and 1980’s blues and rock concert dance hall that attracted top artists including Bonnie Raitt, Miles Davis, The Police, Aerosmith, Tom Waits that was located in a former silk mill in Mansfield, Connecticut. David “Lefty” Foster, owner of Shaboo Productions and manager of the Inn, shares stories that you won’t believe.

WEDNESDAY: Forget the Movie, Trailers Are More Fun 
Trailers give away all the good parts in the movie, including the jokes and best narratives. For most of us, trailers are either a pain or a pleasure and don’t always reflect the tone of the movie. For example, the trailer for Academy Award-nominated “Nebraska” was particularly bad, because the pace and tone of that movie are antithetical to the way mainstream trailers lure us to watch. It said QUIRKY. OFFBEAT. LOVABLE. Yet, the movie received critical acclaim. Among the best trailers was “Batman Returns”. The movie itself was an overrated shamble —a really terrible piece of storytelling— but even Tim Burton’s worst movies have enough good images and set-pieces to entice. The founder of an advertising company that specializes in film trailers, a contributor to the web series “Trailers From Hell”, and The Culture Dogs join us for a look at the past, present, pain, and glory of movie trailers.

THURSDAY: The Science Behind Our Soul 
For centuries, philosophers have pondered what constitutes the soul. Is it an intricate dance between our mind, consciousness and self-perception, God-given and beyond our control, or something more ethereal and fleeting, hard to pin down, yet the essence of who we are. Increasingly, scientific discovery is blurring the relationship between the soul and the brain. Patricia Churchland, philosopher, neuroscientist and author of Touching a Nerve, The Self as Brain, believes the soul and all that goes into it--morals, free will, feelings of love--are mere products of neurochemical reactions. Today, we explore theories of the soul.

FRIDAY: The Nose 
After a much-needed vacation, The Nose panelists are back to pore over this week’s latest culture news, picking the choicest bits for your consumption.

September 29 - October 3, 2014

MONDAY: Beyond the University
What makes an educated person? Is it the desire to learn? The ability to be a critical thinker in any situation? Perhaps. On our show we talk with Connecticut's Wesleyan University President Michael Roth, author of Beyond the University, about why a liberal education matters more than ever.

TUESDAY: TBA

WEDNESDAY: The Food Schmooze
From the cities to the suburbs, backyards are filled with the sounds of clucking like never before as more people invest in having a closer connection to the food they eat and discover the rewards (and challenges) of raising chickens and cultivating their own fresh eggs. Terry Goldon, author of The Farmstead Egg Guide and Cookbook, joins the Food Schmooze gang with her book of delicious and diverse recipes so you’ll never run out of delectable ways to enjoy your eggs for any meal of the day.

THURSDAY: The Theory of Everything
Ask the critics, the summer preview screenings were just okay; there was nothing to talk about, until... The Theory of Everything was shown, a biopic about the life of legendary physicist Stephen Hawking. That movie has offered critics a lot to talk about. We'll talk about movies coming this fall, and explore how Connecticut is doing in attracting moviemakers to The Nutmeg State. AND: At the top of the show, Doris Kearns Goodwin joins us in advance of her appearance at The Connecticut Forum on October 9.

SATURDAY: The Food Schmooze 
From the cities to the suburbs, backyards are filled with the sounds of clucking like never before as more people invest in having a closer connection to the food they eat and discover the rewards (and challenges) of raising chickens and cultivating their own fresh eggs. Terry Goldon, author of The Farmstead Egg Guide and Cookbook, joins the Food Schmooze gang with her book of delicious and diverse recipes so you’ll never run out of delectable ways to enjoy your eggs for any meal of the day.