Coming Up on WNPR

November 17 - 21, 2014

MONDAY: America’s Changing Landscape of Elderly and End-of-Life Care
A new report from the Institute of Medicine takes a closer look at end-of-life care in the United States. On this episode of Where We Live, we’ll take some time to evaluate the the current system that’s in place. We’ll also see what’s being done to improve the quality of care for those nearing the end of life.
TUESDAY: Human Ecosystems
‘Human Ecosystems’ is a global project that taps into the social networks of our cities -- finding out what drives communities and cultures to come together... and also what keeps them apart. It’s the brainchild of one of a Yale World Fellows -- and it’s in New Haven this year. We’ll talk about the kinds of data it’s collecting, and how it can be used to make our cities better places to live.
 
WEDNESDAY: The Wheelhouse
Our weekly news roundtable.
 
THURSDAY: Commissioner James Redeker
We’ll host a one-on-one conversation with DOT Commissioner James Redeker. We’ll get updates on the latest transportation news, including CTFastrack, I-84, and our regional railways. And we’ll be taking your questions throughout the hour -- what else do you want to know about Connecticut’s transportation projects and infrastructure?
FRIDAY: Connecticut Quilts, Gospel Music, and Polish Stories
We’ll meet the family of a Bristol woman who spent a lifetime creating beautiful quilts -- several of which are now on display at the Institute of Community Research in Hartford. We’ll hear her story, and learn how her tradition is being carried on by those who knew her. Later in the program, we’ll also get a taste of some local gospel music. And finally, we’ll hear the story of a 90 year old world war II vet who lives in New Britain, Connecticut. Part of our Polish Stories Project, he and his wife of 69 years talk about their journey from Europe to America.
 

November 17 - 21,  2014

MONDAY: The Scramble
The Scramble is back! Guernica magazine, an online feast of works that merge politics and the arts just celebrated its 10th anniversary. Lisa Lucas, publisher of Guernica, joins Colin to talk about the state of digital publishing and also celebrate National Book Awards week. She recently interviewed a couple of shortlisted finalists. We also bring you news from the weekend.

TUESDAY: Math Is a Competitive Sport
Competition, intense training and long standing international rivalries are words we usually associate with The Olympics. But well before the first Olympics ever occurred, ancient scholars like Archimedes and Pythagorus were competing in a very different type of pursuit: Math. Today, nearly every developed country sends its best and brightest mathematicians to pit brain against brain in a variety of competitive events. Today we’ll speak with one such competitor along with two icons in the field about the world of competitive math.

WEDNESDAY: Beavers to the Rescue
Beavers are suddenly the belle of the ball, getting acclaim for their ability to improve habitats, grow plants and reverse the effects of climate change. That hasn't always been the case and in some places, still isn't. Traders nearly wiped them out hundreds of years ago, Argentina and Chile consider them invasive, and locally, communities are still killing them to make way for development. We’ll explore the fact and fiction behind our perceptions of the beaver. Really, it’s time we see the beaver as a prince instead of a pest!

THURSDAY: Call Me ANYTHING But a Yellow-Bellied, Lily-Livered Coward
Most of us fear being called a coward more than we aspire to be courageous, mostly because in recent times we reserve that word for those we hold in deepest contempt, like Osama Bin Laden and the Boston Marathon bombers. But, how do we define cowardice? Is there an absolute and unambiguous measure or does our definition shift with time and context. Chris Walsh, author of “Cowardice: A Brief History,” says that unlike other heavily-studied negative emotions - like envy, anger and lust - cowardice is hard to define or even confront - we spend more time trying to avoid it, minimize it and disguise it in ourselves. But, maybe Mark Twain got it right when he said, “The human race is a race of cowards, and I am not only marching in that procession but carrying a banner.”

FRIDAY: The Nose
The Nose stopped to smell some roses over the last two weeks but we’re back and ready to sniff out this week’s most interesting news in culture.

November 17 - 21, 2014

MONDAY: TBA

TUESDAY: TBA

WEDNESDAY: The Food Schmooze 
With her groundbreaking bestseller Around My French Table, Dorie Greenspan changed the way we view French food. Now, in Baking Chez Moi, she explores the fascinating world of French desserts, bringing together a charmingly uncomplicated mix of contemporary recipes, including original creations based on traditional and regional specialties, and drawing on seasonal ingredients, market visits, and her travels throughout the country. Like the surprisingly easy chocolate loaf cake speckled with cubes of dark chocolate that have been melted, salted, and frozen, which she adapted from a French chef’s recipe, or the boozy, slow-roasted pineapple, a five-ingredient cinch that she got from her hairdresser, these recipes show the French knack for elegant simplicity. Dorie Greenspan joins the Food Schmooze® gang

THURSDAY: The Book Show
The Book Show gang joins Faith live with recommendations in all categories. And we’ll take your calls! What’re you reading? What’ve you recently read and loved? Are you a librarian? A teacher? Are you part of a book club? Call us!

SATURDAY: The Food Schmooze
With her groundbreaking bestseller Around My French Table, Dorie Greenspan changed the way we view French food. Now, in Baking Chez Moi, she explores the fascinating world of French desserts, bringing together a charmingly uncomplicated mix of contemporary recipes, including original creations based on traditional and regional specialties, and drawing on seasonal ingredients, market visits, and her travels throughout the country. Like the surprisingly easy chocolate loaf cake speckled with cubes of dark chocolate that have been melted, salted, and frozen, which she adapted from a French chef’s recipe, or the boozy, slow-roasted pineapple, a five-ingredient cinch that she got from her hairdresser, these recipes show the French knack for elegant simplicity. Dorie Greenspan joins the Food Schmooze® gang.