Coming Up on WNPR

September 15 - 19, 2014

MONDAY: The Middle East Conflict's Roots in Geography
Last week, President Barack Obama made his case for increased U.S. intervention in Iraq and Syria. We'’ll talk with national security expert Scott Bates, who thinks working with Iraqi Kurdish forces could be the key to defeating this extremist organization.We’ll also talk to a veteran war correspondent who wrote a biography about T.E. Lawrence -- better known as Lawrence of Arabia -- and revisit a conversation about The Revenge of Geography with geopolitical analyst Robert Kaplan.

TUESDAY: Military Families
WNPR’'s Lucy Nalpathanchil guest hosts a show about the lives of military spouses and families. She’ll talk to Sarah Smiley, whose memoir is about her husband'’s 13 month deployment and how her and her sons invited members of the community to join her and her children for dinner.

WEDNESDAY: The Wheelhouse
Our weekly news roundtable.

THURSDAY: Racial Profiling and Diversity in our Police Departments
A new report from the Institute for Municipal and Regional Policy at Central Connecticut State University takes a closer look at racial profiling in Connecticut. This hour,
we’ll hear from one of the authors of that report.  Later, we’ll also take a look at diversity in our police departments. Why are so few African Americans becoming police officers? What obstacles are turning many of them away from the police force? And how do we fix this? Shafiq Abdussabur guest hosts.

FRIDAY: Education and Health Equity Panel
WNPR’'s Diane Orson is guest hosts a panel discussion about education and its impact on health equity. 

September 22 - 26, 2014

MONDAY - Hell (Rebroadcast):

If you were dreaming up a new religion, maybe you wouldn't include the idea of hell. But in traditional forms of Christianity, even as they evolve, hell seems almost grandfathered in. They can't quit hell. Or can they? A 2013 Harris poll found that while 74% of U.S. adults believe in God, and 68% believe in heaven, only 58% believe in the devil and in hell, down 4 percentage points from 2005. Still, 58%! That seems like a lot. On this show, we explore the current status of how Americans view hell, up to and including the surprisingly consistent absence of hell that Millennials consider when asked, as part of a college course, to create their own religions.

TUESDAY - Stuffed Animals (Rebroadcast):

Our relationship with stuffed animals is a subject of curiosity. While they make act as a child's first companion by contributing to life's teachings, is there an age that children need to let go of their stuffed friends? Some adults continue to hold onto their stuffed animals, either for comfort or retention of their childhood memories, but is there an attached stigma with these comfort objects? This hour, we focus on the allure of these transitional objects, why we continue to hold onto them, and how they are helpful in overcoming trauma. We also speak with a "travel agent" who journeys around Japan to provide stuffed animals with a truly cultural experience.

WEDNESDAY - Twins (Rebroadcast):

Is it true that as kids, twins sometimes create their own languages, or don't need to speak at all in order to communicate? How do identical twins handle the common misconceptions and misidentifications throughout their lives? And how may they feel a little differently than we do when one twin dies? We'll hear personal stories from two sets of identical twins in-studio, as well as from the Director of the Twin Studies Center at Cal State (Fullerton) on why there are more identical twins now than ever, and what we can learn about ourselves by the history of studying twins.

THURSDAY - Villains (Rebroadcast):

In Dickens, bad people are bad. The very badness of them necessitates the good behavior of other characters, and makes it incredibly precious. But whom do you encounter in modern pop culture? Tony Soprano, Walter White, Dexter, Al Swearengen - these are remorseless killers, but they are also people with whom we are invited to identify. Do we understand pure villainy anymore? On this show, we talk to scholars and big thinkers about what makes a villain, and if a villain needs a hero.

FRIDAY - De-extinction (Rebroadcast):

Science writer Carl Zimmer names the Dodo and the Great Auk, the Thylacine and the Chinese River Dolphin, the Passenger Pigeon and the Imperial Woodpecker, the Bucardo and Stellar Sea Cow among the species that humankind has driven into extinction. What's notable about that list is that most of us would recognize maybe three or four of those names. Think about that. We have obliterated entire species whose names we don't even know. Now, there's a chance to bring some of them back. Even if the science is not quite there, it's very close.Should we do it, and should we give special preference to creatures who are wiped out by us, as opposed to the birds and animals who existed before we had the ability to kill them all? While other species remain uncatalogued, and still others sit on the brink of modern extinction, is bringing back the old species the best use of our time and resources?

September 15 - 19, 2014

MONDAY: TBA

TUESDAY: Identity After Retirement
Extraordinary numbers of people are about to join the ranks of the unemployed -- by choice. They're about to retire. Who are you after you can no longer continue in work that in many ways has given you your sense of identity, what you say you are when you meet someone... a detective, judge, reporter, florist, teacher, bus driver.  Faith and longtime contributor Bruce Clements will talk with retired boxing champion Marlon Starling, who lives in Hartford now without much fame, money, and sometimes without any recognition. How does he define himself now? How does he, and how do we, celebrate the past, yet assume new, expanded identities?

WEDNESDAY: The Food Schmooze
We're not letting summer go just yet. We have ideas about how to make it last: How to create the perfect gin and tonic. Store-bought or homemade cornbread on the grill. Faith's BLT chicken, grilled on a raft of salad greens with crumbled bacon and tomatoes. The best chocolate sorbet -- yes, dark chocolate sorbet -- topped with toasted salted walnuts. Great food tips, tricks, news, and events. Plus a bargain wine. That's on this week's fresh edition of The Food Schmooze.

THURSDAY: Parenting on the Go
What is the most treasured resource for families with young children? Time. Between keeping house, shopping, doing chores, and getting everyone to work and school -- let alone fitting in family meals, fun activities, and much-needed downtime -- being a parent can require major feats of scheduling. Now, for today's busy families, child-development expert and bestselling author David Elkind offers Parenting on the Go: an authoritative, accessible guide for parents of infants and young children. Elkind joins us for the hour.=

SATURDAY: The Food Schmooze 
We're not letting summer go just yet. We have ideas about how to make it last: How to create the perfect gin and tonic. Store-bought or homemade cornbread on the grill. Faith's BLT chicken, grilled on a raft of salad greens with crumbled bacon and tomatoes. The best chocolate sorbet -- yes, dark chocolate sorbet -- topped with toasted salted walnuts. Great food tips, tricks, news, and events. Plus a bargain wine. That's on this week's fresh edition of The Food Schmooze.