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Health

President Trump signed an executive order Thursday that is intended to provide more options for people shopping for health insurance. The president invoked his power of the pen after repeated Republican efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, have failed.

"The competition will be staggering," Trump said. "Insurance companies will be fighting to get every single person signed up. And you will be, hopefully, negotiating, negotiating, negotiating. And you will get such low prices for such great care."

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Republican members of the Connecticut legislature’s Public Health Committee have called for a full investigation into the systematic abuse of a 62-year-old patient at Whiting Forensic Division, the state's maximum security forensic hospital in Middletown.

Access Health CT

Connecticut’s health insurance exchange, Access Health CT, is ramping up for open enrollment. The Obamacare marketplace is facing a number of challenges this year. 

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A potential new treatment for Alzheimer’s disease is being tested on human patients for the first time. The idea, which has close ties to Connecticut, is different to every other approach currently on the market for this still-incurable disease. 

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Sleep. We all need it. Yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly one in three U.S. adults do not get enough of it.

Coming up, we consider the impact of this and other sleep-related trends with Dr. Meir Kryger. His new book is called The Mystery of Sleep.

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During the 1920’s, some Connecticut women took jobs painting watch dials with radium-laced paint. At the time, they didn’t know it was toxic. As these so-called “Radium Girls” began to die, their stories became part of a rallying cry for industrial regulation.

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Health insurance for thousands of children in Connecticut could soon disappear.

That’s because Congress failed to meet a September 30th deadline to renew funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, or CHIP.

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Medical students are turning from the two-dimensional pages of their textbooks to the three-dimensional world of hand-held models. That’s because 3-D printing is changing the way doctors learn complex procedures, a development which could make medicine more personalized.

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The mass shooting in Las Vegas is dominating the media news cycle. Since the tragedy Sunday night, TV news and social media have displayed a continuous stream of images and video of the chaotic scene at the Highway 91 Harvest Festival that left at least 59 dead.

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Talks continued Monday between health insurer Anthem and Hartford HealthCare hospitals.

Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young are the joint winners of the 2017 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine, winning for their discoveries about how internal clocks and biological rhythms govern human life.

The three Americans won "for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm," the Nobel Foundation says.

Communication is one of the most urgent needs in Puerto Rico. Government officials must connect with each other to coordinate recovery efforts, and residents want to reach out to loved ones. Three-quarters of the island has no cell phone signal. Maria's fearsome winds knocked out all but about 100 of the island's 1,600 cell towers.

But the town of Guayama found a way to stay in touch.

Updated at 10:10 p.m. ET

Millions of people in Puerto Rico need fuel, water, food and medicine. More than a week after Hurricane Maria devastated the island, major infrastructure is still down. Stores have trouble filling their shelves. Families are running low on the supplies they stockpiled before the storm, and across the island, many residents say they haven't seen any aid deliveries.

Meanwhile, at the port in San Juan, row after row of refrigerated shipping containers sit humming. They've been there for days, goods locked away inside.

Ken Cedeno / International Medical Corps

Dr. Robert Fuller visited five primary clinics in Puerto Rico Wednesday -- gong clockwise around the island from San Juan to Arroyo and then north to Caguas.  

Ken Cedeno / International Medical Corps

Robert Fuller was loading his car with supplies in San Juan, getting ready to leave the battered capital for a trip inland to survey damage to local health facilities, when we caught up with him by phone.

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