Health

The Faith Middleton Show
1:13 pm
Tue April 9, 2013

Predictive Health

Alex Proimos/flickr creative commons

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The Faith Middleton Show
1:13 pm
Tue April 9, 2013

Predictive Health

Alex Proimos/flickr creative commons

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Where We Live
12:05 pm
Tue April 9, 2013

A Look At Pool Safety

Flickr Creative Commons

On Nov. 21, 2012,  Malvrick Donkor, 14, drowned during a swim class at Manchester High School.

His death was the second drowning at a Connecticut school last year. In the neighboring town of East Hartford, Freshman Marcum Asiamah  drowned Jan. 11 during P.E. class at East Hartford High School.

His family - like Malvrick’s from Ghana - said the boy did not know how to swim. The lessons at school were apparently his first. This year, the town settled a $1.5 million claim with his estate.

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Where We Live
11:36 am
Thu April 4, 2013

Redefining Disability

taberandrew, creative commons

If you take a look at movies or TV, you’d think that having a disability is the worst fate possible-- maybe even worse than death.  Better to not be born at all than struggle through life unable to walk, hear, see or talk.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:24 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

Real Lives Of Foster Families

Daquella Manera, Flickr Creative Commons

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Physicians
1:51 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

New Medical School Wants To Build Ranks Of Primary Care Doctors

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 1:30 pm

Michael Ellison has a tough assignment. He's the associate dean of admissions choosing the first class of a brand new medical school, the Frank H. Netter School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn.

"We have over 1,600 applicants, and we will interview 400 for 60 spots," Ellison says.

The school has a very specific mission: minting doctors who want to go into primary care practice.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
3:46 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

The Future of Stem Cells

Idaho National Laboratory on Flickr Creative Commons

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The Colin McEnroe Show
3:46 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

The Future of Stem Cells

Idaho National Laboratory on Flickr Creative Commons

Stem cells are the Wild West of biomedicine.

  The commercially run SpaceX Dragon capsule just delivered mouse stem cells to the International Space Station, part of an experiment to see how long periods in space affect living organisms.

  In Scotland, researchers are attempting to make blobs of stem cells in a three-d printer.

  And in Italy, terminally ill patients are being given an untested, unproven and theoretically risky stem cell treatment over the protests of scientists.

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Child Health
10:39 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Medicaid Changes Lead to Massive Dental Gains for Connecticut Children

Flickr The Commons

Studies show that poor oral health can make young people suffer in ways adults would never tolerate. "For some kids, they are scared forever. I know people who will not talk. They will not open their mouth. They will cover their mouth," said Dr. Tryfon Beazoglou, who recently co-authored a report with Joanna Douglass, also from the University of Connecticut's School of Dental Medicine. "Often many of these children have had pain for so long that they act out in other ways and it's picked up as behavioral problems in the class room," Douglass said.

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Where We Live
11:31 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Traumatic Brain Injury

Patrick Dencker on Flickr Creative Commons

Traumatic brain injury has become a household term thanks largely to football players and veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

The Center for Disease Control estimates at least 1.7 million TBIs occur every year. More than half of those come from either falls or motor-vehicle accidents.

With so many TBI victims, it's likely that you or someone you know has been affected by this.

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The Faith Middleton Show
1:34 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Regaining Balance

Ethan Sherbondy/flickr creative commons

Everybody gets knocked off course. How do you rebalance in an unpredictable world? Bruce Clements joins Faith to talk about the art of restoring balance. Are there go-to tactics that work for most people? Or is the answer different depending on what happens to you? What can we learn from others? How do you get perspective when the clear mind you need is clouded and confused?

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Where We Live
11:59 am
Fri March 15, 2013

The High Cost of Health Care

StockMonkeys.com on Flickr Creative Commons

When we need to go to the hospital, we usually don’t care what it costs to make us better. We just want to get better.

And when you think about it, you shouldn't have to worry about how much it costs when you’re sick or hurt.

But in America, where we’re likely to spend $2.8 trillion dollars on health care this year, the care we receive doesn’t cost the same for everyone.

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Coming Home Project
6:13 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

VA Offers Free Gun Locks To Help Prevent Vet Suicides

The Department of Veterans Affairs began giving out gun locks in 2008, modeling a national gun safety program called Project ChildSafe
Sue Ogrocki AP

Every day an estimated 22 veterans kill themselves in the U.S. and most of them use a gun to do so, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs. This trend mirrors the general population where more people kill themselves with guns than by all other methods combined.

The VA is trying to help with a program that offers gun locks to veterans for free. The thinking is that if they lock their guns up they might not reach for them in the spur of the moment.

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Coming Home Project
4:58 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

VA Gives Gun Locks To Veterans To Prevent Suicides

Lucy Nalpathanchil

Every day an estimated twenty-two veterans kill themselves in the U.S. and most of them will use a gun to do so according to the US Department of Veterans Affairs. This trend mirrors the general population where more people kill themselves with guns than with all other methods combined. The VA is trying to help with a program that offers gun locks to veterans for free. The thinking is that if they lock their guns up they might not reach for them in the spur of the moment. 

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New Study
4:03 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

Salt Could Be Behind Rise In Autoimmune Diseases

Dr. David Hafler is chairman of Yale's Department of Neurology. He's been studying multiple sclerosis for several decades. His lab looks at T-cells known as "helper cells," which are meant to assist the immune system, but do the opposite in diseases like Type 1 diabetes. He says the cells went wild when they removed them from blood and added salt: "The surprise of the study was the degree to which salt could induce as much inflammation both in the mouse and in vitro."

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Where We Live
10:44 am
Thu March 7, 2013

Population Demographics: Have More Babies?

Parker Knight, Creative Commons

So, if there are now 7 billion people in the world, how can we possibly need to have MORE babies?

Well, the truth is, today, deaths outnumber births in more than a dozen countries, and another 24 will see population decline by mid century.

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Risk Factor
5:55 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

FDA Warns Doctors About Codeine For Kids Post-Surgery

Courtesy of Flickr CC by Nils Geylen

The Food and Drug Administration is warning health care professionals to not prescribe pain medicine containing codeine to children post-surgery. As WNPRs Lucy Nalpathanchil reports some hospitals like Connecticut Children's Medical Center are going further.

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Where We Live
10:24 am
Wed February 20, 2013

Hyper-Local Aid To Africa

Chion Wolf

The idea ‘For what you pay to feed your cat, you can save lives in my country.’ That...set a fire under Quinnipiac Professor Dennis Richardson.

He works in remote villages in Cameroon to aid a community of about 1,000 people.

On the opposite side of Africa, student and faculty of the University of Hartford are helping remote farmers create sustainable agriculture businesses in rural Kenya.

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Starving For Change
8:21 am
Tue February 19, 2013

Stigmatizing "Food Addicts"

Chickadeeacres on Flickr Creative Commons

In the first studies to examine what the public thinks about people with an addiction to food, researchers at Yale’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, found that while those with food addiction are viewed more favorably than those with other addictive behaviors, labeling obese persons as addicts further stigmatizes them.

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Coming Home Project
6:12 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Clifford Beers Clinic to Help Military Families

Courtesy of Clifford Beers Clinic

A New Haven mental health clinic has received a federal grant to help the children of military families. The clinic aims to use the funding to fill a gap that exists in the VA health care system.

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Where We Live
8:18 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Assisted Outpatient Treatment Laws

epSOS.de on Flickr Creative Commons

The Sandy Hook shootings have resulted in a special bipartisan task force of the Connecticut legislature.  Last week’s public hearing dealt with recommendations to enhance school safety.  Today’s lengthy hearing is about reducing gun violence, and tomorrow they’ll talk about increasing access to mental health care.

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Healthy Eating
10:57 am
Sun January 27, 2013

Real Life Survival Guide Episode 69

Cindy Papish Gerber

As we rounded the corner in to 2013, my thoughts turned from the food I had been eating during the holidays to the food I’ve been eating during the football playoffs, and I figured it was a good time to talk about what we put in our bodies on a daily basis.

For this conversation, I invited Yale Professor Kelly Brownell, writers Mary Elliott and Susan Campbell, Weatherman Matt Scott, home chef Rob Oliver and the formerly huge Duo Dickinson - to join me for a conversation about healthy eating.

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Children's Health
1:51 pm
Wed January 23, 2013

UConn Study Focuses on Children Who Lose Autism Diagnosis

Courtesy of Flickr CC by BLW Photography

A study by University of Connecticut researchers has found that some children diagnosed with autism at a young age improved to a point where they no longer had symptoms of the disorder.

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Where we Live
1:40 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

Treating Trauma Before It Hurts

Kortunov on Flickr Creative Commons

After Newtown, school nurses and teachers have been asking for training to identify the early signs of trauma in children. The Child Health and Development Institute held two training sessions last week for school personnel in Connecticut with several more planned in the following weeks. 

Joining us this morning is Dr. Robert Franks, a trauma expert and Vice-President of The Child Health and Development Institute.

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Where We Live
10:41 am
Mon January 7, 2013

Providing Healthcare in Rural Communities

Chion Wolf

There are plenty of roadblocks to healthcare, especially if you’re without insurance and money. But for many Americans, just finding a doctor can be difficult.

Although nearly a quarter of the U.S. population lives in rural communities, only a one in ten physicians practice there....they have only a third as many specialists as cities. The population’s older...it smokes more...and suffers from more accidental deaths.

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Where We Live
10:59 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Feeding Our Children

TJ Hanton (Flickr Creative Commons)

According to Children’s HealthWatch, in 2010, there were 48.8 million Americans who lived in households that were food insecure, including 16.2 million children.

But in a nation suffering from an obesity epidemic, is hunger really the problem? Experts tell us that yes, while obese kids are not all hungry, many of the most malnourished are obese.

But, as the richest state in the nation, how can Connecticut really have that many hungry kids?

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State Law
8:22 am
Wed January 2, 2013

Labeling Genetically Modified Foods in Connecticut

Wikimedia Commons

After a bill to require labeling for genetically modified foods failed to make it out of the Connecticut legislature’s Environment Committee this past February, a bi-partisan legislative task force met last month to consider their next move.

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Coming Home Project
4:22 pm
Thu December 20, 2012

Formerly Homeless, An Army Vet Prepares for Christmas

Photo by Lucy Nalpathanchil

It's been five months since 16 homeless veterans moved into permanent supportive housing thanks to the American Legion Post in southeastern Connecticut. The Jewett City Post renovated its own building to create the apartments. The project was funding by the federal VA with help from private donations, Second district Congressman Joe Courtney, and the state of Connecticut.

This past summer, WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil introduced us to one of the new tenants, an Army veteran. She visited him recently as he prepares for his first Christmas inside his own place.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:44 pm
Mon December 17, 2012

The State of Mental Health Care in Connecticut

Chion Wolf

I'm not a big fan of getting ready to fight the previous war. Our next crisis will not be Adam Lanza. It will not be an exact replica of the facts of his life, not that we know those for sure yet. (I would say, parenthetically, that the worldwide rush to diagnose Lanza makes me massively uncomfortable.)

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Coming Home Project
5:42 pm
Thu December 13, 2012

Suicide 'Epidemic' Among Active Duty Military and Veterans

Photo courtesy of Truthout.org

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta has called on military leaders to explore a "epidemic" of suicide among active duty servicemembers and veterans. Each day, 18 veterans kill themselves according to the federal Department of Veterans Affairs. In Connecticut, 30 veterans have died this way since 2009, but those are only the suicides that the VA knows about.

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