WNPR

Health

The Connecticut Health Investigative Team's senior writer Lisa Chedekel published a report on Massachusetts-based veterans who say they were exposed to Agent Orange in the United States. Read her article here.

In the years since they flew together out of Westover Air Force Base in Massachusetts in the post-Vietnam War era, Wes Carter and Paul Bailey have stayed in close touch, swapping information about families, jobs, and their former crewmates in the 74th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron.

This year, the conversation took a strange turn: Bailey, who lives in New Hampshire, was diagnosed with prostate cancer in February. Two months later, Carter, a former Massachusetts resident who now lives in Oregon, got the same diagnosis.

stevendepolo, flickr

Last weeky we did a whole show about sugar.  We talked to author Gary Taubes who wrote an article for New York Times titled “Is Sugar Toxic?” After talking with him awhile, it seems as though he and the scientists he quoted had made a conclusion.  Their answer is “yes.”  

But we had a few listeners who weren't happy with Taubes’ claims. Today we get a response from The Sugar Association.

New Haven Food Truck Makes Its Rounds

Aug 22, 2011
Tim Cipriano

A mobile food truck is roaming the streets of New Haven this summer, handing out free meals to students from low income neighborhoods. The truck is reaching kids who might not otherwise get a healthy meal.  

The Betsy Ross School in New Haven is empty -- kids are out for the summer. But the parking lot outside -- that's buzzing. The New Haven School Food Truck has arrived.

Scared Sick

Aug 19, 2011

All the news about health and medicine we’re exposed to might lead some to healthier lifestyles...but to some people, all this information can cause a problem.

For hypochondriacs, a little knowledge about health and medicine can lead to a fear of everything that can possibly go wrong with their bodies.

Photo by Mykl Roventine (Flickr)

How much sugar do you eat? The U.S.D.A. estimates the average American consumes more than 3,500 pounds of sugar in their lifetime.

Sugar seems to be in or on everything. Cereal, coffee, yogurt, candy, ketchup and of course...soda. It certainly affects our health, and is seen as the main culprit in “epidemics” of obesity and diabetes.

But sugar has also impacted the course of history, changed the fate of empires, and affected millions.

Flickr Creative Commons, Monica's Dad

The famine in the Horn of Africa is getting worse by the day.

Somalia is suffering deeply from the 3 year drought with more than 3.5 million Somalis facing starvation.

An estimated 600,000 of the starving are children.

Disaster relief organization, AmeriCares - based in  Stamford, CT - recently shipped emergency aid to Somalia. Inside the shipment are enough medical supplies to care for roughly 15,000 people.

Flickr Creative Commons, eviltomthai

All of us know migraine sufferers.

Four Failing Lungs

Jul 27, 2011
spec-ta-cles

In 2010, there were 1,770 lung transplants performed in the United States -- the most ever in a single year.

For a person with Cystic Fibrosis, the transplant may extend life by years – or it could lead to continued suffering and rejection of the new organ.

Later in the program, we'll hear about the latest research into lung transplants and even artificial lungs.  But first we hear a documentary about two young people struggling with end-stage Cystic Fibrosis, and struggling with a decision about transplant.

"Model Workplaces" in Connecticut Not Always Safest

Jul 25, 2011
All rights reserved by LetMeTakeYourFotograf

In February 2007, David Gootkin came to the state Capitol in Hartford to testify in favor a bill prompted by his brother Robert’s death the year before at Covanta’s waste-to-energy plant in Wallingford. The bill, which eventually was adopted, requires that operators of solid waste facilities have at least two employees or a camera in the work area when waste is being fed into a hopper.

Big City Violence

Jul 14, 2011
Chion Wolf

The number of violent crimes in the US dropped significantly last year to the lowest rate in 40 years.

But then why haven’t Connecticut cities like Hartford and New Haven been able to join this trend?  

Tara Gulwell, Creative Commons

Here’s the misperception: Eating disorders affect white, middle and upper class women.  A new study says, “not true.”  

The study, published in the International Journal of Eating Disorders, finds that Native American women are just as likely to suffer from binging and purging as white women.

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