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Health

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House Republicans in Washington have passed a law to undo the Affordable Care Act -- the signature legislation of President Barack Obama. But Connecticut officials and some health care advocates have not responded favorably. 

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Connecticut’s prison population is getting older, upping the demand for healthcare including hospice programs that serve inmates and ex-offenders.

This hour, we find out what it means to die with dignity behind bars. 

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Officials say Connecticut is experiencing an "extraordinary" season for ticks. Nearly 40 percent of more than 1,000 ticks tested so far were positive for the bacteria causing Lyme disease.

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Life after death, in one form or another,  has been examined by multiple disciplines for centuries: From theology, to physics, to philosophy, to medicine and more. But while the topic is taken seriously by some, it remains a focus of ridicule and skepticism by others.

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The tick population in Connecticut is on the rise, and so is the threat of Lyme disease — and other tick-borne illnesses.

This hour, we hear the latest from medical professionals and policy makers about the need for new funding and research to battle a “growing tick problem” in the Northeast.

There's sort of a designated driver in Jason Stavely's circle of Iraq buddies, but he doesn't take away people's car keys. He takes the guns.

"Come toward September-October, if I get the feeling, I'm more than happy to give my guns back to my buddy again," said Stavely.

Stavely has bad memories from the war that get triggered every autumn. And last year, one of his Marine Corps friends died by suicide in October. So Stavely's therapist at the Veterans Affairs clinic suggested getting his guns out of the house.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

National uncertainty over the future of the Affordable Care Act is making state officials nervous, and the CEO of Access Health CT, the state’s health care exchange, has told his board that he fears insurers could back out of the marketplace the state created. 

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Sleep. We all need it. Yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly one in three U.S. adults does not get enough of it.

Coming up, we consider the impact of this and other sleep-related trends with Dr. Meir Kryger. His new book is called The Mystery of Sleep.

After high school, Staff Sgt. Kimi wanted to go to art school, but she didn't have the money. So she joined the military.

Intelligence analysts like Kimi work with drone pilots and others in the Air Force to guide decisions about where to deploy weapons in the fight against ISIS and al-Qaida. (The U.S. Air Force won't release her last name because of the high-security work she does).

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The state's efforts to control the opioid addiction crisis are getting a boost from new federal funding. Connecticut will receive a $5.5 million federal grant. 

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The tick population and tick-borne diseases are steadily increasing in Connecticut and throughout the Northeast according to scientists. In response, Senator Richard Blumenthal announced a federal grant to enhance research efforts into mosquito and tick-borne diseases.

Two combat veterans from Connecticut are the lead plaintiffs in a class action lawsuit against the U.S. Army. They say an army review board failed to consider post-traumatic stress disorder when it decided not to upgrade their less-than-honorable discharges. The Yale Law Clinic filed the suit Monday in New Haven.

Ryan Caron King

Connecticut’s U.S. senators say there’s still a very real threat to the Affordable Care Act, despite the failure of the Republicans’ alternative health care bill. It centers around funding for some of the system's crucial subsidies.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The screening process for refugees entering the U.S. involves multi-layered security checks, interviews, and an overseas medical exam. After their arrival, families will undergo another health assessment, usually coordinated by a resettlement agency.

It’s where their stories begin to unfold to the doctors and physicians-in-training at Yale University's Pediatric Refugee Clinic.

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HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S. Nearly half of American adults have it according to a recent report from the National Center for Health Statistics.

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