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Environment

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Summer *officially* kicks off next week -- and if recent temperatures are any indication of what's to come, then it's going to be a hot one.

This hour, we find out what opportunities -- and challenges -- lie ahead for Connecticut’s garden lovers. We check in with gardening expert Charlie Nardozzi, and we want to hear from you. 

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., ruled Wednesday that the Trump administration failed to follow proper environmental procedures when it granted approval to the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline project.

It's a legal victory for the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and environmentalists, who protested for months against the pipeline. Oil started flowing through it earlier this month. The tribe fears that the pipeline, which crosses the Missouri River just upstream of its reservation, could contaminate its drinking water and sacred lands.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Although I grew up in Waterbury with a big veggie garden in the backyard, my first foray into gardening as an adult was in a community garden. 

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Connecticut’s top insect expert is banking on more rain, and a fungus, to knock back populations of gypsy moths. For the past two years, those hungry pests have plagued Connecticut’s trees.

ChrisHConnelly / Creative Commons

A resolution to change the state constitution has stalled in the legislature. It would modify how the state transfers public lands, but needs to jump through some legislative hoops before appearing as a ballot question for voters. 

The Environmental Protection Agency's Appeals Board hears arguments Thursday on the second phase of cleaning up the Housatonic River in Berkshire County.

Jim, the Photographer / Creative Commons

After a hesitant start to summer, I think it's finally here. That's good news for watermelon lovers. Watermelons, like all melons, love the heat. So far it's been a slow start to summer, but luckily these cucurbits grow fast under the right conditions.

Days after President Trump announced that he would be pulling the U.S. out of a global agreement to fight climate change, more than 1,200 business leaders, mayors, governors and college presidents have signaled their personal commitment to the goal of reducing emissions.

In an open letter, the signatories vow to "continue to support climate action to meet the Paris Agreement," even "in the absence of leadership from Washington."

Ryan Caron King / NENC

In the wake of President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement, Governor Dannel Malloy announced last week that Connecticut will join with other states to uphold its principles.

White House

The United States will withdraw from the international climate agreement known as the Paris accord, President Donald Trump announced on Thursday. He said the U.S. will negotiate either re-entering the Paris agreement, or a work on a new deal that would put American workers first.

President Trump announced Thursday that the U.S. will leave the Paris climate deal.

Here are five things that could be affected by the decision.

1. The coal industry

Even coal companies had lobbied the Trump administration to stay in the agreement.

Forecasters say the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season, which begins Thursday, could bring "above-normal" storm activity. Residents along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts are making sure they have supplies and plans in place if a storm hits.

Kazuya Yokoyama / Creative Commons

We know this Mediterranean herb more for its scent and medicinal uses than for its culinary attributes. Its Latin name means "to wash," which refers to its use in baths, beds, and clothing. The oil has been used medicinally as a disinfectant, antiseptic, and to soothe migraines. This herb also adds a slightly sweet flavor to breads, soups, salads, and desserts. We know it as lavender.

The company that owns the Three Mile Island nuclear plant, site of the worst nuclear disaster in U.S. history, announced that it plans to shutter the facility in 2019 unless the state of Pennsylvania steps in to keep it open.

The plant near Harrisburg, Pa., hasn't been profitable for the past five years, according to owner Exelon Corp. The company announced last week that it failed to auction off future energy production from Three Mile Island for the third year in a row.

Video screengrab by Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Once plentiful in New England’s rivers, native Atlantic salmon have since all but disappeared.

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