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Environment

During a July morning at the New England Aquarium Animal Care Center in Quincy, Massachusetts, a clinical volunteer checked the heart rate of a Kemp's Ridley sea turtle with a Doppler instrument as a part of its physical exam.   

Former Vice President Al Gore says Americans are changing their ideas about climate change.

cogdogblog / Creative Commons

What goes in your recycling bin can be confusing. Now, the state is trying to clear up some confusion by putting out a new universal list. It’s part of a campaign called “What’s In. What’s Out.”

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This extended warm, fall weather has me appreciating late blooming perennial flowers. Certainly we're all familiar with asters, sedums, and chrysanthemums, but one that has more recently shown up on my radar is the Montauk daisy. 

Betsy Kaplan / WNPR

In 1955, Connecticut experienced catastrophic flooding that killed more than eighty people. Two back-to-back hurricanes  - Connie and Diane - dropped over two feet of rain across Connecticut. The rains overwhelmed the Naugatuck, Farmington, and Quinebaug Rivers and their tributaries too quickly for many to escape its wrath. After the flood, Connecticut enacted flood control measures that led to several new dams. 

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Oily and smelly - Atlantic menhaden are one of the least sexy fish imaginable. But this humble fish, also called “bunker” or “pogie,” has deep roots off the coast of New England. 

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The Emerald Ash Borer, the Asian longhorn beetle, now the Southern Pine Beetle. This hour, we learn about the newest in a series of pests and diseases decimating species of trees in New England.

For some in New England, the deadly fires in California are a reminder of when fires overtook much of Maine around this time of year, 70 years ago. Wildfires in 1947 simultaneously burned over hundreds of miles for ten days, wiping out towns, and forever changing the landscape. 

BerndH / Wikimedia Commons

Winter is coming but that doesn’t mean you’re done in the garden.

Wikimedia Commons

What started as one scientist's hunch turned into a decade of research, which now claims a positive link between an invasive shrub called Japanese barberry and deer ticks.

Jesse Palmer / Creative Commons

October is a time of apples, corn stalks, Halloween, and jack-o’-lanterns. Visit a local farm stand now to pick out your pumpkin for carving. But instead of making a jack-o’-lantern this year, try making a jack-o’-plantern?

Julian Povey / Creative Commons

Novelists have been writing for decades about worlds in which the climate is in crisis. Those stories are becoming increasingly realistic -- in a sense, the future is already here.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Pine forests in New England could soon be at the mercy of an incredibly destructive insect. The southern pine beetle is making its way north. And a new study says climate change could speed up its migration.

Updated at 11:40 p.m. ET

Hurricane season isn't through with us yet.

The speed and ferocity of the wildfires raging through Northern California's wine country have caught many residents off guard and left state officials scrambling to contain the flames.

But for fire researchers, these devastating blazes are part of a much larger pattern unfolding across the Western United States. So far this year, fires in the U.S. have consumed more than 8.5 million acres — an area bigger than the state of Maryland.

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