WNPR

Environment

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET

The Department of Energy has declared an emergency at a nuclear-contaminated site in Washington state, after soil caved in over a portion of a tunnel containing rail cars contaminated with nuclear waste.

"All personnel in the immediate area have been accounted for — they are safe — and there is no evidence of a radiological release," Destry Henderson, spokesperson for the Hanford site's emergency operations center, said in a brief statement on Facebook.

When three sacred staples of the South weren't safe from the cloudy, salty water in his town, Clay Duffie knew there was a problem.

"It'd kill your azaleas if you irrigated with it; your grits would come out in a big clump, instead of creamy like they should," Duffie said.

Even the sweet tea.

"Your tea would come out all cloudy," Duffie said. "Oh man, it was bad news."

Karim D. Ghantous / Creative Commons

Turn back the clock just a couple of centuries, and to our ancestors, the alchemy of electricity would seem like magic: with the single flip of a switch, our rooms are bathed in light.

StuffNThings / Creative Commons

A survey of hundreds of private wells in Connecticut found around seven percent contaminated with unsafe levels of arsenic or uranium -- elements linked to a variety of illnesses.

Katie Hetrick UC Davis / Creative Commons

Many gardeners want to grow their own food. Homegrown produce is fresher, safer, and healthier. But many gardeners don't want to sacrifice the beauty of their yard by removing flowers or shrubs to plant edibles. The solution is foodscaping.

Millstone Power Station

As nuclear power plants across the country close, the owners of the Millstone Power Station in Waterford, Connecticut are asking the state legislature for help. They want to sell their electricity directly to utilities through a state-run auction. It's a controversial -- and complicated -- request. And now, some energy experts think the nuclear industry should embrace a simpler solution: taxing pollution.

Costa Costantinides / Creative Commons

This weekend's Peoples Climate March against the Trump Administration's rollback of Obama era environmental policies coincided with more alarming news about arctic melt, rising oceans, and the EPA's removal of climate science information.

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

Tens of thousands of demonstrators took to the streets Saturday in Washington, D.C., and cities across the globe, for the People's Climate March, demanding action on protecting the environment.

On a sweltering hot day in the nation's capital, protesters made their way down Pennsylvania Avenue chanting, singing and banging drums. Once they reached the White House, some staged a sit-in while others marched past carrying signs and shouting, "Shame, shame, shame."

apasciuto / Creative Commons

President Donald Trump this week ordered a review of the U.S. Antiquities Act. The move could impact the Atlantic Ocean's first-ever marine national monument, created last fall.

Gardening Solutions / Creative Commons

One of the biggest trends in the last 20 years in vegetable gardening has been the expanded use of raised beds. It's not a new idea, but it seems everyone is embracing a raised bed to grow better tomatoes, lettuce, carrots, and many other crops.

Dru Bloomfield / Creative Commons

Multiple coyote sightings in New London have put residents there on edge. They report coyotes following them on daytime walks with family pets and small children, showing no apparent fear of humans. 

In the northeast U.S., there is less than 1 percent of old growth forest left. A new University of Vermont study finds that harvesting trees in a way that mimics old growth forests not only restores critical habitat, but also stores a surprising amount of carbon.

Dean Hochman / Creative Commons

Connecticut's environmental watchdog has issued its annual check-in on the state's environment. The Council on Environmental Quality said the state needs to do more to meet its environmental goals.

Susan Melkisethian / Creative Commons

Scientists and science enthusiasts will stage a gathering in Hartford on Earth Day as part of the national "March for Science" event.

James Gaither / Creative Commons

I love the common name of the tree Chionanthus viginicus. Old Man's Beard is a good description of the white flowers that bloom in May and June. It's one of the later leaving-out and blooming spring shrubs and trees. 

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