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Environment

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy has vetoed a green energy proposal spearheaded by the city of Bridgeport. The project would have created an underground heating system in one portion of the city.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Residents in Connecticut and Rhode Island’s coastal communities are cheering the Federal Railroad Administration's decision to back away from a controversial rail plan that would have re-routed a section of the Northeast Corridor through historic towns and important ecosystems along New England’s southern coast.

Jane / Creative Commons

We often get wowed in late spring and early summer with all the colorful flowering shrubs. Lilacs, spirea, rhododendron, mountain laurel, and weigela are just some of the beautiful shrubs that burst into color in May and June. But come July and August, our shrub borders often just look green.

Today is the 200th birthday of author, activist and abolitionist Henry David Thoreau.

Thoreau’s individualist views and distaste for government make him a hero to many people across the political spectrum. But it’s his role as a naturalist and an avid record-keeper that makes him a hero to many scientists. His notes are helping scientists like Boston University biology professor Richard Primack study climate change.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The Federal Railroad Administration announced Wednesday that it won’t go ahead with a controversial plan to re-route a major rail artery in Connecticut and Rhode Island.

A massive iceberg the size of Delaware has broken free from Antarctica and is floating in the sea.

Earlier Wednesday, scientists announced that the 6,000-square-kilometer (about 2,300 square miles) iceberg had come loose, after satellites detected it had calved off the Larsen C ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula.

Progressive Animal Welfare Society / Creative Commons

Bats eat an enormous amount of bugs. It’s the kind of feeding that keeps pests down and agriculture stable.

But a newly updated report from the Connecticut Council on Environmental Quality says the cave-dwelling bat population is down, and that’s a reason for concern.

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Summer is officially here! And it looks like it's going to be a hot one.

This hour, we find out what opportunities -- and challenges -- lie ahead for Connecticut’s garden lovers. We check in with gardening expert Charlie Nardozzi, and we want to hear from you. 

Victoria LaBarre was climbing out of a canyon and into a bright, vast, seemingly lifeless landscape when she started to experience an astronaut's nightmare.

"Suddenly," she said, "I couldn't breathe."

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / Creative Commons

President Trump announced last month the U.S. would withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement — despite attention on the wide ramifications of climate change including its effects on where people can live.

This hour, we talk about why the phenomenon of “climate migration” has a global reach.

Sergey G / Creative Commons

This pest is native to the Southwest United States but has spread and become a worldwide problem for anyone growing potatoes. It's the Colorado potato beetle. 

Twenty years ago Tuesday, a plucky little probe named Pathfinder landed at Ares Vallis on the surface of Mars.

It didn't land in the traditional way, with retrorockets firing until it reached the surface. No, Pathfinder bounced down to its landing site, cushioned by giant air bags. It was a novel approach, and the successful maneuver paved the way for a similar system used by the twin rovers Spirit and Opportunity in 2003.

A record-breaking 2.3 million New Englanders are expected to be hitting the road this Fourth of July weekend, driving more than 50 miles from home.

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center / Creative Commons

Long before our modern highways, there was an extensive network of Native American trails up and down the East Coast.

This hour, we hear about efforts to map these old trails and find out how they’re helping archaeologists and others learn about the past. 

Baker County Tourism / Creative Commons

We think of peaches as a special summer treat from Georgia or New Jersey, but they were originally grown in China and can be grown in Connecticut. 

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