WNPR

Environment

D.E.P. Commissioner Goes D.E.E.P.

Apr 21, 2011
Chion Wolf

Somers Greenhouse Powers Up With Wood

Apr 21, 2011
Nancy Eve Cohen.

Officials from the U.S. Department of Agriculture gathered at a wholesale greenhouse in Connecticut, today to celebrate a federal program that funds  energy projects.  WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports.

Minor Flooding Forecast On Connecticut River

Apr 15, 2011
Nancy Eve Cohen

The Connecticut River rose above flood stage in parts of Connecticut and Massachusetts today and is expected to continue to rise Thursday. But the forecast is for minor flooding. WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports.

Lecture Series Marks 40th Anniversary Of DEP

Apr 15, 2011
Chion Wolf

Forty years ago this month the state of Connecticut created the Department of Environmental Protection. The D.E.P. is marking the occasion by launching a lecture series. As WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports the goal is to stimulate thinking about the agency’s expanding role.

Human Traffic Signals

Apr 11, 2011
Uma Ramiah photo

For at least 20 minutes on Friday evening, no one ran a red light at the corner of Church and Chapel Streets downtown.

It may have been all those human red lights, on a mission.

“We’re here because we’ve noticed a problem in New Haven, where drivers run red lights pretty frequently,” said Juli Stupakevich (pictured), who organized a “Red Means Stop” protest at that intersection. “Red just doesn’t mean stop anymore.”

So Few Smelt

Apr 11, 2011
Flickr Creative Commons, John Loo

Migrating fish just a half-foot long once flooded coastal rivers of the northeast every spring. In recent decades, rainbow smelt populations have been declining every year, and are fading to a dim memory in many places. But not in Down East Maine. As part of a collaboration with Northeast stations, Murray Carpenter reports that elsewhere in the region, scientists are trying to bring them back.   

Public Service of New Hampshire

The nation’s first carbon trade system, which started in the northeast, may be in trouble. The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, or RGGI, is designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions ten percent by 2018. But now, three of the ten states in the initiative are considering withdrawing, in part, because of the cost to electric ratepayers. As part of a collaboration with Northeast stations, Amy Quinton with New Hampshire Public Radio reports.

Boaters Can Help Stop Spread Of Invasive Species

Apr 8, 2011
Andres Musta

The state Department of Environmental Protection is training volunteers to educate boaters about invasive species on Candlewood Lake. Last fall the invasive zebra mussel was found in Lakes Zoar and Lillinonah. The mussel can be carried in boats from one lake to another. Eleanor Mariani of the D.E.P. says the volunteers will ask boaters to make sure they’ve cleaned their vessels if they’ve been in a lake that contains the mussel.

Meeting On Mattresses

Apr 8, 2011
Violentz, Flickr Creative Commons

Government and businesses have figured out how to recycle a lot of things such as bottles and cans, old computers and even left-over paint. But how do you recycle something that’s big, bulky and may contain bed bugs? That’s the subject of the first national meeting on mattress recycling that will be held next Monday in Hartford. 

Learning About the Problem of PCBs

Apr 8, 2011
Nancy Eve Cohen

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is holding a series of workshops this week on the human health risks of PCBs in the Housatonic River and the different approaches to cleaning them up. WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports.

Before the mid-1970s, when polychlorinated biphenyls or PCBs were deemed toxic and banned by Congress, the chemical compound was commonly used in manufacturing. General Electric used PCBs when it made electrical transformers at its former plant on the Housatonic River in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.

New Britain Busway

Apr 5, 2011

Governor Dannel Malloy has given his stamp of approval on construction of a New Britain to Hartford busway. The busway will travel along a 9.6 mile route of abandoned railroad bed, easing congestion on Interstate 84. Opponents and Supporters of the project met late last month with the Governor to offer their opinion on this controversial project.  One of those opponents is University of Connecticut Civil Engineering professor, Norman Garrick.

Governor Gives Green Light for Busway

Apr 5, 2011
Capitol Region Council of Governments

Connecticut is closer to getting its first rapid transit system. Governor Dannel Malloy announced today his support for a rapid bus project from New Britain to Hartford. As WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports the Governor says he also wants to devote state funds to study a rail project in Waterbury.

State Closes Trail to Protect Nesting Eagles

Apr 4, 2011
goingslo, Flickr Creative Commons

The state Department of Environmental Protection is closing down a hiking trail  for a few months in Windsor Locks to keep people away from a nesting pair of Bald eagles. 

Invasive Algae Discovered in Farmington River

Apr 1, 2011
Photo by Bikeride via Flickr Creative Commons

Connecticut’s environmental agency says an invasive algae has been discovered in the west branch of the Farmington River, a favorite place for trout fishing. Although the algae has been found in Vermont, New Hampshire and New York this is the first time it has been seen in Connecticut. WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports.

Golden Eagle Helps Site Wind Turbines

Mar 31, 2011
Nancy Eve Cohen

It’s not that unusual to see Bald eagles in parts of the Northeast, but Golden eagles are rare here. In all there are only one to two thousand in eastern North America. As part of a collaboration of Northeast stations, WNPR’s Nancy Cohen reports from a windswept hilltop in Connecticut where a rescued Golden eagle was released into the wild.

One day this winter, farmer Brian Hawks was snowmobiling in Amenia, NY, when he saw something on the side of the trail. It was a Golden eagle with an injured foot.

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