Martin Svedén / Creative Commons

A tree’s roots touch more than just soil. They reach into the recesses of our past; into our culture and our traditions. It's something Fiona Stafford writes about in her new book The Long, Long Life of Trees. This hour, we sit down with the author. 

James DeMers / Creative Commons

Spring bulb planting is in full swing this month. While weather conditions can influence the survival of your tulips, daffodils, crocus, and other spring bulbs, critters can have a dramatic effect, too. 

Walk a few hundred yards into the woods in Durham, Connecticut these days and you’ll see something that looks like it’s out of “Mad Max.”

Large trucks with big wheels and giant robotic arms are grabbing trees and slicing them down.

But as Patrick Skahill from Here & Now contributor WNPR reports, this controlled chaos is a calculated timber harvest, with the long-term goal of creating a more resilient forest.

The nation’s first offshore wind farm off the coast of Block Island is in the middle of its testing phase. It’ll start producing electricity next month. Delegates from various federal Sea Grant programs around the country got a boat tour of the turbines to learn how the Ocean State got this project done. 

Lori Mack / WNPR

Clean water advocate Christopher Swain stopped in New Haven during a 130-mile swim from Montauk to New York City.

grongar / Creative Commons

A settlement has been reached in a complaint filed against a Glastonbury, Connecticut metals-treatment company. The lawsuit, which was filed under the Clean Water Act, means Connecticut Galvanizing will have to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees and penalties.

sometimes drywall / Creative Commons

More than 2,000 volunteers recently helped clean up the Connecticut River as part of the 20th anniversary of the "Source to Sea Cleanup," a multi-state effort spearheaded by the Connecticut River Watershed Council to get trash and old plastic out of the water.

Conservation biologists say that the good news for wildlife is there are still extensive tracts of forest habitat in the northeast. Yet as humans have built up roads and housing developments, crossing between key habitat areas — such as from the Adirondacks to the Green Mountains — can be a dangerous trip for a moose or a bear.   

Bicycles are a type of vehicle so they belong on the road, right?

This is how the wheels turn in places such as New York City and San Francisco, where bicyclists older than age 13 are banned from riding on the sidewalk. Similar laws exist in many cities and towns throughout the country, such as Columbus, Ohio, and Chapel Hill, N.C.

That's not the case everywhere, though. In Boston and Washington, D.C., sidewalk cycling is allowed — with the exception of the downtown areas. But just because bicyclists are allowed to ride on the sidewalk doesn't mean they are welcome there.

© Council Brandon

Since April, protesters against an oil pipeline have been camping in tents, tipis, and trailers at a site just across the Missouri River from the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota. For a few days, I stayed at the camp, and met people who gathered there to support the effort.

Quartzla/Pixabay / Creative Commons

Ahh, October in Connecticut. Cool weather, pumpkins, hot cider and gorgeous fall foliage. While Mother Nature does a pretty good job serving up an abundance of color in fall, we can add to the rainbow of beauty in our own yards.

Those who knit and crochet are familiar with two standbys: needles and yarn, but there's a lesser-known material in the world of needlework -- plastic yarn, or "plarn."

id Reneke / Flickr

If Anthony Bourdain and Wes Anderson were to ever collaborate, chances are they'd end up creating something like Atlas Obscura. The founders of the website -- dedicated to strange, forgotten and hidden wonders around the world -- are now out with a new book featuring 700 of their most spectacular examples.

Office of Governor Dannel Malloy

Governor Dannel Malloy said Tuesday the construction of the Hartford Commuter Rail Line is on track to be completed by January 2018, thanks in part to a state-of-the-art machine.

When Hurricane Matthew lost strength and headed out to sea over the weekend, the storm took its high winds and driving rains with it.

Pez Owen was flying over the desert in her single-engine Cessna airplane when she spotted a huge "X" etched in the desert below. She says it was the strangest thing.

"It's not on the [flight] chart," Owen says. "There just wasn't any indication of this huge cross."

Then she spotted another one.

"There had to be some reason," she says. "So, of course, I immediately thought I had to get Chuck in on this."

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating Saturday night’s crash and derailment between two trains on the Long Island Rail Road’s Main Line in Nassau County.

Making landfall Saturday, Hurricane Matthew brought floods and strong winds to South Carolina's Lowcountry region, pouring rain into an area that now faces a dangerous storm surge. As of 11 a.m. ET, the storm's center was around 55 miles south-southwest of Myrtle Beach.

Field Outdoor Spaces / Creative Commons

The leaves are turning, the temperature is dropping -- autumn has arrived and with it, the start of an exciting new season for New England gardeners.

This hour -- from planting, to pruning, to pest prevention -- we team up with Connecticut Garden Journal host Charlie Nardozzi to answer your fall gardening questions. What are you doing to prepare your garden for the spring and summer months? 

Updated 11:50 p.m. ET with hurricane center report

The eye of Hurricane Matthew is just off the coast of Georgia, pushing surge flooding into Florida and Georgia, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm's highest sustained winds are 105 mph. The storm is expected to move near or over the coast of South Carolina Saturday.

Updated 1:23 a.m. ET with emergency declaration in Georgia

Late Thursday night President Obama declared a state of emergency in 30 Georgia counties. The president's action authorizes FEMA to coordinate all disaster relief efforts and provide "appropriate assistance."

Updated 11:00 p.m. ET with hurricane center report

Darren Swim commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Relic38 / Creative Commons

This common flower has been grown for thousands of years in China and Japan not only for its beauty, but for medicinal and culinary uses. A Chinese proverb says, "If you want to be happy for a lifetime, grow chrysanthemums."


One of the most unique dining experiences can be found at a restaurant in New Haven, Connecticut and the owner and chef will be recognized by the White House for his innovation.

Anna Vignet for Reveal

A Massachusetts senator released a report on Wednesday claiming that it would cost up to $52 billion to get rid of toxic PCBs from public schools across the country.