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Tens of millions of dollars that were to be set aside to make homes and businesses more energy efficient will instead be pumped into the state’s general fund.

It’s a funding raid that’s been criticized as a “hidden tax” on utility bills.

Here’s what the changes mean for consumers -- and greenhouse gases.

Cordelia (Flickr) / Creative Commons

This time of year we're all starved for color indoors. But there's one houseplant that can brighten up your day and is found in grocery stores to home centers.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission flickr.com/photos/nrcgov/6517600977/ / Creative Commons

A decision that could change the way Connecticut’s only nuclear plant sells its power is expected in the coming weeks. Now, dozens of legislators are using the state’s recent cold snap as evidence the Millstone Power Station needs to stay online.

This story was originally published Jan. 8, 2017 at 5:22 p.m. ET.

New England electricity customers could get a direct benefit from a cut in federal corporate taxes — lower utility bills.

Consumer advocates in New England are calling on regulators and utilities to turn over to ratepayers any savings from a reduction in the corporate income tax rate, which the recent tax law knocked down by 40 percent.

About half of New England’s households are on septic systems. That’s the highest proportion in the country. 

Wayne National Forest / Creative Commons

The town of Simsbury is debating whether it will formally appeal a massive solar project. At issue is a decision reached by the Connecticut Siting Council last month.

The recent cold spell has spurred oil-fired power plants throughout New England into action. But the operator of the regional electricity grid says pollution control regulations could throttle supplies from those sources.

Over the last decade, relatively low-polluting natural gas has been New England’s dominant fuel for electricity generation. But in winter, demand for gas can skyrocket from consumers who need it to heat their homes, and that can limit supplies for electricity generation.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

An aging trash incinerator located on Hartford’s riverfront will continue to burn garbage in the coming years. But a new developer chosen by the state said it will work to drastically reduce the amount of waste incinerated at the state’s largest trash plant.

Carol Moshier / Creative Commons

With all this cold weather I find myself sitting by a fire with tea and homemade Italian pignoli cookies, while imagining the summer garden. But it's more than just dreaming. I'm placing my seed order and have found some new vegetable varieties to try.

If you live anywhere along the U.S. East Coast, brace yourself for what is about to come: a nor'easter that forecasters are calling a "bomb cyclone."

How much the storm affects the coast is contingent on a number of factors, most notably how far out to sea it tracks.

Scott..? / Flickr Creative Commons

Connecticut’s first-in-the-nation program for recycling mattresses is approaching its third birthday. The “mattress stewardship program” continues to experience growth, recycling about 162,000 mattresses last year.

scrappy annie (Flickr) / Creative Commons

With the holidays behind us, many are cleaning up after all the gift giving. Like many gifts, some are worth saving and others are better regifted. This is also true of those holiday plants. Let's look at those plants worth saving and those best composted.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Long Island Sound has a new guardian of sorts. Earlier this year, biologist Bill Lucey was named soundkeeper of the Northeast estuary.

This hour, the Connecticut native stops by our studios.

We learn more about his role and talk about efforts to improve life in and around the Sound.

AGs Sue EPA To Enforce Smog Regulations

Dec 28, 2017

The attorneys general in eight Eastern seaboard states are suing the Trump administration’s Environmental Protection Agency over air pollution that blows in from upwind states.  

A contractor for a natural gas pipeline company improperly dumped thousands of gallons in Agawam, Massachusetts.

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