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Education

Closing The Gap - In The Suburbs, Too

Mar 15, 2011
Connecticut Mirror

First of three parts

    WEST HARTFORD--Xavier Rosa is stuck. The fourth-grader at Braeburn Elementary School knows that five is not a factor of 57-he got the question right on his homework assignment. And he knows that any number that ends in five is divisible by five. But his teacher, Michele Cashman, presses him to remember what the other half of the rule is, asking him how many cents he would have if he had two nickels.

    "Ten," he says.

    "So, what's in the one's place?"

    Bonnie Brown, Creative Commons

    Today is Connecticut Association of Boards of Education day at the state Capitol.  Some 200 school board members, students, and teachers will spend the day talking with state lawmakers about their concerns and their legislative agenda.  Joining us is Patrice McCarthy, Deputy Director and General Counsel of The Connecticut Association of Boards of Education. 

    FrankJuarez / Creative Commons

    Leadership in school districts is more important than ever before – as schools struggle to fulfill local educational needs, while paying close attention to edicts from the federal government.  

    Then, of course, there’s the job of finding the money to do it all…while dealing with politics, parents and issues of student achievement which may not all be under your control. 

    Today, where we live, we’ll look at the job of superintendent, and ask what it takes to find the right leader in the schools to run your “race to the top.”

    Emerging Adults

    Feb 28, 2011
    archie4oz, creative commons

    Step aside “quarter life crisis” -  there’s a new term for 20-somethings in that transition phase of their lives.  He calls it “emerging adulthood”

    Dr. Jeffrey Arnett claims that in the past half century, the experience of people aged 18 to 29 has changed dramatically - at least in some societies.

    Most young people now postpone marriage and parenthood until at least their late twenties, and spend their late teens through their mid-20s in self-focused exploration, trying out different possibilities in love and work.

    woodleywonderworks, creative commons

    Governor Malloy is pushing to increase the minimum age for kindergarten, hoping to close the achievement gap and raise test scores.

    The state's plan is simple. To enter kindergarten, a child would need to turn 5 by October first...rather than the current date of January 1. The bill would also keep 7-year-olds out of kindergarten. It means more kids are closer to the same age- something that would make sense for a lot of schools.

    Record-setting snowfall, sub-zero temperatures and treacherous travel conditions have meant plenty of missed school days this year.  Educators are worried that lost classroom time may affect preparation for standardized tests. 

    State Department of Education spokesman Tom Murphy says he’s seen school closings, late openings and early dismissals in other years, "but this is really beyond what we’ve seen ever.  And it couldn’t happen at a worse time in our high schools, when we have our end of course exams" 

    Eastern Washington University, Flickr Creative Commons

    In his State of the Union address, President Obama called on higher education to reinstate the Reserve Officer Training Corps on college campuses. Many elite colleges and universities haven't had ROTC chapters since the late 1960s. But the end of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell could open the door. Most undergraduates at Yale University think its a good idea. 

    Yale student Katherine Miller says President Obama’s message is clear. The military is becoming more inclusive. And that  means she’ll be able to pursue her dream of a career in uniform. 

    A is for Admission

    Jan 24, 2011

    A former admissions officer at Dartmouth College reveals how the world's most highly selective schools really make their decisions.

    Credit Greg Verdino/Flickr Creative Commons

    It’s commencement weekend for many colleges and universities in Connecticut. Among them is Wesleyan University in Middletown, where there’s been a lot of talk this year about a subject that’s often buried in a culture of silence: campus sexual assault.

    In the first of a series of stories on the issue, WNPR’s Diane Orson reports on how the university judicial process handled the case of a 2010 graduating senior named Eve, who’s asked that we not use her last name.

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