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Education

Six Wedding Dresses and a Curtain

Oct 6, 2011

What can the fabric from six dresses and a curtain tell us about 150 years of one family’s history?  As it turns out, quite a lot.

Within the CHS archives lives a clue to six generations and 150 years of a family’s past: a small board with seven swatches of fabric lovingly attached.  Six of the fabrics are from wedding dresses and the seventh is a curtain fragment.  Each piece was labeled with the name of a bride, her groom, and their wedding date.  The swatches of fabric were handed down and finally assembled as a unique family record.

CPBN

***Note: This story contains corrected text, amended since the original broadcast and web publishing date***

The Hartford Public School District has entered into a 10-year agreement with Connecticut Public Broadcasting Network, the parent of WNPR, to build a "Learning Lab" for high school seniors.  

The Secretary of the U.S. Air Force was in New Haven on Monday.  He joined Yale University officials to announce a new Reserve Officer Training Corps unit on campus. Air Force ROTC is the second military detachment to agree to return to Yale this year.  The university announced in May that it would also reinstate a Naval ROTC unit. 

Teaching About 9/11

Sep 9, 2011
Diane Orson

As the nation prepares to commemorate the tenth anniversary of September 11th,  Connecticut schools are holding special assemblies and classroom discussions. We report on some of the challenges facing educators who teach students about 9/11, and the larger issues that surround the historic event.

Many schools in Connecticut delayed opening their doors last week thanks to Tropical Storm Irene.  But students at Capital Preparatory Magnet School in Hartford have been in school since last July.  And the school’s principal says he’ll be working harder to improve academic outcomes. 

Chion Wolf

Principal Steve Perry has been hailed for his “tough love and high expectations” at Capital Prep Magnet School in Hartford.

He’s had success in keeping kids in school in a city that’s struggled with dropout rates for decades. He preaches strict discipline and no excuses. He greets kids every morning at a school right downtown - in a famous former department store. The students wear uniforms - and he says all of them go to college.

Coutesy of Flickr CC by No Division

It’s an exciting time for college freshman as they begin classes this week. Among them are students who just a few months ago didn’t think they could afford college. That changed July 1 when a new state law went into effect, making illegal immigrants eligible for the in state tuition rate at Connecticut colleges and universities. WNPR’s Lucy Nalpathanchil introduces us to one of those students, an 18 year old named Karen.

Chion Wolf

New UConn President Susan Herbst has taken on the job with big plans for the state’s flagship university.

When we spoke with Herbst months ago, just before her appointment had become official, we talked at length about athletics at the school - a point of statewide pride, but also national controversy over graduation rates and compliance issues in the men’s Basketball program.

Veterans are among college students heading back to class this fall. At the University of Connecticut, more than 400 students have military experience. They're considered non-traditional students given the fact many enroll after multiple deployments. WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports on one way campuses are working to accommodate their needs. 

You've probably heard of New Haven Promise by now.  It's a scholarship program funded by Yale University and community partners which awards New Haven public school students who show academic potential.

But the Promise program isn't just about paying tuition for some.

WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil spoke with New Haven Promise Executive Director Emily Brynes about the program's community outreach.

 

Cheating Schools

Aug 18, 2011
albertogp123

The state is investigating teachers and staff at a Waterbury elementary school about suspected cheating on the 2011 Connecticut Mastery Tests.

This follows widespread cheating scandals uncovered in the District of Columbia, Baltimore and Atlanta…just this year.  In a story this month, the magazine Education Week put it this way:

“As long as test scores are used in any field to make decisions on rewards or punishments, including for schools or educators, a small percentage of people will be willing to bend the rules - or break them.”

Governor Malloy addressed the state’s school superintendents on Wednesday and presented his vision for a state education system that better prepares students for the kinds of jobs Connecticut employers can offer.

Governor Malloy began an impassioned 20-minute speech on education by describing why as a kid,  he loathed school. "..because I had a very different experience than a lot of my peers, having grown up with learning disabilities and not having reached any great level of achievement until late in high school."

Governor Malloy visited Wesleyan University in Middletown on Monday.  He met with leaders of Connecticut’s private colleges and universities to talk jobs.

The Connecticut Conference of Independent Colleges represents 16 schools that employ over 22,000 people.  

Hariadhi via Wikimedia Commons

Despite the high stakes attached to its multimillion-dollar statewide school testing program, new allegations of cheating show that Connecticut--like many other states--relies almost entirely on local districts to spot and report fraud.

An apparent cheating scandal at a Waterbury elementary school on the Connecticut Mastery Test came to light only after Waterbury officials alerted that state last month that something was amiss.

An investigator for the State Department of Education has begun to question teachers and staff at a Waterbury elementary school about suspected cheating on the 2011 Connecticut Mastery Tests.  This is the latest in a string of cheating scandals nationwide.

17 teachers and other employees at Hopeville School in Waterbury have been placed on leave as an investigator looks into possible test tampering.  A preliminary review showed many wrong answers on this year’s CMTS had been erased and corrected.  

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