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Connecticut State Library

April 6, 2017 marks 100 years since the United States officially entered the First World War — igniting the journey for thousands of young men to the deadly trenches of Europe.

This hour, we learn about the soldiers and hear how Connecticut was one of just a few states with records that explained how some of these men viewed their service. 

Imagine if one notice from the federal government could cause you to question your major life decisions.

More than half a million people may have found themselves in that situation after a new legal filing by the Education Department.

Under a program known as Public Service Loan Forgiveness, some student loan borrowers were supposed to be able to have the balance of their student loans forgiven after ten years of both on-time payments and eligible work in the public sector. Meaning, a qualifying nonprofit, federal, local, state, or tribal government.

David DesRoches / WNPR

Two of the state's largest school systems picked new superintendents recently, leaving only one major city -- New Haven -- without a permanent full-time leader. 

Numbers Jump At Yale's Campaign School For Women

Apr 3, 2017

“2017 is the year of the woman,” says Patricia Russo. Russo is the executive director of the Women’s Campaign School at Yale University, a program that trains women who want to run for public office. It’s been in existence for over twenty years, but Russo says this year is different. There is an unprecedented level of interest in the training sessions.

Office of Gov. Dannel Malloy

The state Department of Transportation is sharing its prize money from the Q bridge with New Haven Promise students.

Jimmy Emerson / Creative Commons

Researchers at the University of Connecticut say that a state effort to improve the lowest performing school districts lacks coherence, leading to questions about the program's effectiveness.

Gloda/iStock / Thinkstock

This hour: segregation in the aftermath of Sheff v. O'Neill.

It's been more than 20 years since the landmark state Supreme Court ruling. We find out what two reporters uncovered about its impact on Hartford schools.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Hartford residents gathered Thursday at a city school to talk about a report that found the school district failed to protect students from abuse and neglect for the last decade. District leaders have a plan in place to address this longstanding problem.

ImagineerJC / Creative Commons

The president of the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities system is recommending tuition hikes. 

A report released by a children's advocacy group shows that opportunities for young people vary widely between cities and towns across the state. 

Victor Björkund/ Creative Commons

It's been 20 years since Connecticut's landmark Sheff v. O'Neill ruling, which said that segregation in Hartford schools was unconstitutional. This hour, we dive into an investigation by The Hartford Courant about how some neighborhood schools are still struggling, and how Sheff didn't solve the challenge of school integration. 

Middlebury College

A recent Gallup poll of college students found that a majority of students think that colleges shouldn’t restrict speech on campus just because some political views are controversial or unpopular. But lately, disruptive protests of controversial speakers have again brought the issue of free speech front and center. 

Even in a bean bag chair, 15-year-old Michelle sits up straight. With her hands on her knees, she looks down at the ground, smiling as she talks about her dreams of being a writer and a military doctor.

As a high school freshman, Michelle is already accomplishing a lot: She's president of the student government association at the International High School at Langley Park. She also writes for the school newspaper and plays basketball. To protect her privacy, we're only using using her first name.

Lori Mack/WNPR

Diversion programs offer first-time youth offenders an alternative to the traditional juvenile justice system -- sometimes called a pipeline to prison. For a little over a year in New Haven, a diversion program called Project Youth Court has taken shape. 

Nancy Eve Cohen / NEPR

At Philip G. Coburn Elementary School in West Springfield, Massachusetts, students come from all over the world. Most of the English language learners there arrive as refugees.

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