Education

Higher Education
11:59 am
Wed October 22, 2014

Rally Calls on Yale to Allow Graduate Assistants to Unionize

Sarah Eidelson Yale Unions

Governor Dannel Malloy joined more than 1,000 union workers, local and state officials on the streets of New Haven at Yale University on Tuesday. The support of labor and the city of New Haven are seen as critical for Malloy in the upcoming election.

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Higher Education
10:00 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Where Should Universities Draw the Line on Ebola-Related Research and Student Safety?

Yale-New Haven Hospital.
Yale Alumni Magazine

Yale-New Hospital received word late Friday from the Centers for Disease Control confirming preliminary test results showing the patient hospitalized in isolation last week with Ebola-like symptoms does not have the Ebola virus.

The patient is one of two unidentified Yale doctoral students who returned recently from a research mission in Liberia. Though the student did not come directly in contact with Ebola patients, Yale officials say the hospitalized student did come in contact with one person who eventually developed Ebola.

The scare has raised questions about educational research, foreign exchange, and study abroad travel to countries with Ebola outbreaks.

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California
9:29 am
Fri October 17, 2014

LA Schools Superintendent Steps Down, Defends Tenure

Los Angeles Unified School District Superintendent John Deasy, seen in a photo taken last year, says his resignation Thursday was "by mutual agreement."
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 10:12 am

Los Angeles schools Superintendent John Deasy has stepped down as head of the nation's second-largest school system after a controversial tenure that saw him at odds with the teachers union and unable to push through a plan to get an iPad in every student's hand.

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High Schools
7:03 am
Fri October 17, 2014

New Research Suggests Small High Schools May Help After All

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Fri October 17, 2014 4:05 pm

Findings from a new long-term study of small high schools in New York City show the approach may not only boost a student's chances of enrolling in college but also cost less per graduate.

The city began an intensive push to create smaller learning communities in its high schools in 2002. That year, the city's education department rolled out a districtwide lottery system for high school admission.

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Student Protest
1:52 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

At UConn, Does "Civility" Trump Free Speech?

George Washington University, 2005
dcJohn / Creative Commons

On August 28, UConn held a pep rally for the football team on a patio outside the Student Union. The 6:00 pm event included the UConn marching band and cheerleaders, and was emceed by UConn IMG Sports Radio Network -- pretty typical for this sports-crazy campus.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
8:00 am
Wed October 15, 2014

Live From Watkinson: The Perils of Teaching and Learning

Credit naosuke ii / Flickr Creative Commons

If I had my way, we would do this whole show without the "E" word. That's "education." Somehow, the "E" word has come to symbolize, for me at least, debates about government policy, instead of teaching and learning. I wanted to talk about those other two things: teaching and learning. So I rounded up a public school teacher, a private school principal, a public school superintendent, and one of the nation's most outspoken commentators on teaching and teachers.

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Television
7:03 am
Mon October 13, 2014

Daniel Tiger: Won't You Be His Neighbor?

Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood is in its second season on PBS.
PBS

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 9:06 am

Lexi Schaefers' preschoolers squeal with excitement. Their eyes are trained on an animated tiger dressed in a red hoodie and sneakers, peeking out of the TV at them.

These 3- and 4-year-olds at Shady Lane Preschool in Pittsburgh, Pa., sing along with the songs and laugh and mimic what the characters are doing onscreen.

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Higher Education
4:55 pm
Sun October 12, 2014

To Cut Student Debt, Florida College Cuts Off Some Student Borrowing

Students at Broward College in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., attend a debt management workshop. Broward is one of 29 colleges that no longer accepts unsubsidized student loans. The effort is part of an experiment to cut down on student loan debt and defaults.
John O'Connor WLRN

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 6:52 pm

To get a student loan at Broward College, one of Florida's largest community colleges, you first have to sit through a two-hour financial lesson with Kent Dunston.

It's a little like Scared Straight, the 1978 documentary designed to keep kids from ending up in prison.

Dunston's lesson, though, is about scaring students into making good financial choices. Nationwide, student loans total more than $1.2 trillion. And schools now face punishment — even closure — by the federal government if the rate is too high.

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No Child Left Behind
12:57 pm
Sat October 11, 2014

It's 2014. All Children Are Supposed To Be Proficient. What Happened?

President George W. Bush, seated, signs No Child Left Behind into law at Hamilton High School in Hamilton, Ohio.
Ron Edmonds ASSOCIATED PRESS

Take yourself back to those highly emotional, patriotic months after the 9/11 attacks.

In the midst of war, terrorism, fear and mourning, one bill passed 87-10 in the Senate and by a similar margin in the House — with equal support from both sides of the aisle. It was signed into law in January 2002 by George W. Bush, with the liberal lion of the Senate, Ted Kennedy, by his side.

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Teaching Math
4:03 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

Who Needs Algebra? New Approach To College Math Helps More Pass

Ashjame Pendarvis, a first-year community college student, works on her math homework at the University of District of Columbia.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 7:16 am

Let's start with a little word problem. Sixty percent of the nation's 12.8 million community college students are required to take at least one course in subject X. Eighty percent of that 60 percent never move on past that requirement.

  1. Let Y = the total percentage of community college students prevented from graduating simply by failing that one subject, X. What is Y?

    The answer: Y = 48.

  2. And if you haven't guessed it by now, What is X?

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Massachusetts
8:59 am
Thu October 9, 2014

Two Members Of Obama Cabinet Visit Springfield Community College

U.S. Sec. of Education Arne Duncan ( in blue shirt) and U.S. Sec. of Labor Thomas Perez participated in a panel discussion about federally funded job training programs developed by Massachusetts community colleges.

Originally published on Wed October 8, 2014 3:51 pm

Two top officials with the Obama administration visited western Massachusetts today to see the impact of federal dollars on workforce development.

U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez and U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan were briefed about the job training programs developed by Massachusetts community colleges since the schools were awarded $20 million by the Labor Department in 2011 to forge partnerships with employers.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:13 am
Wed October 8, 2014

Kids Today Are SO Spoiled!

Credit Lord Jim / Creative Commons

Kids today are so spoiled! Alfie Kohn says politicians, academics, and the media spend a lot of time instilling in parents the fear that they're ruining their children with too much love. 

But, Kohn says wait a minute! Instead of assuming we're spoiling kids who don't show grit, motivation, and a competitive spirit, maybe we should instead question those values we hold dear.  

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School Safety
10:30 am
Wed October 8, 2014

Schools And Law Enforcement Taking Notice Of Recent Threats

Originally published on Wed October 8, 2014 1:16 pm

There has been a recent string of bomb threats and cyber attacks at schools across New England. Both schools and law enforcement agencies are paying attention.

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Louisiana
8:03 am
Thu October 2, 2014

New Orleans Schools Face A Surge Of Unaccompanied Minors

Yashua Cantillano, 14, arrived in New Orleans in June from Tegucigalpa, Honduras. He's now enrolled in a charter school, Carver Prep, on the city's east side.
Mallory Falk/WWNO

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 8:17 pm

For 14-year-old Yashua Cantillano, life in New Orleans is an improvement.

But that's not saying much.

Just three months ago, Yashua was in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, dodging gang members. He says they would drive by his school, guns visible, threatening to kill him, his younger brother — Yashua's whole family.

"We'd hide all day," Yashua says, "and that kept us from going to school."

After crossing the U.S. border illegally, he came to New Orleans and ultimately enrolled at Carver Prep, a small charter school on the city's east side.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Tue September 30, 2014

"Greater Expectations" of the Common Core; a Music Career's Unlikely Revival Story

Jirka Matousek Creative Commons

The Common Core has been a big part of this year’s campaign for governor -- and a rallying cry for teachers, parents and students. But new documentary looks at what’s really in the common core that might provide some common ground between many sides on the education reform debate. 

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Ethics
5:15 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

When Teachers, Not Students, Do The Cheating

LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Mon September 29, 2014 6:30 pm

Opening arguments began today in the trial of 12 Atlanta educators charged in an alleged cheating conspiracy that came to light in 2009.

Prosecutors claim there was widespread cheating on state tests throughout the city's public schools, affecting thousands of students.

The case has brought national attention to the issue, raising questions about whether the pressures to improve scores have driven a few educators to fudge the numbers, but also about broader consequences.

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:32 am
Mon September 29, 2014

Is a Liberal Arts Degree Still Smart?

Credit Buck Butler for Sewanee: The University of the South/flickr creative commons

What makes an educated person? Is it the desire to learn? The ability to be a critical thinker in any situation? Perhaps.

For me, an educated person has the capacity to be a critical thinker—and an optimist at the same time. An educated person has developed a curious mind, thinks critically, has empathy, and an optimistic view.

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Campus Sexual Assault
9:56 am
Fri September 26, 2014

UConn Makes Changes in Wake of Sexual Assaults

UConn President Susan Herbst in a file photo.
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

University of Connecticut president Susan Herbst said the school has made significant changes to better prevent and respond to sexual violence on campus.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Thu September 25, 2014

School Start Times: Are Your Kids Getting Enough Sleep?

Daniel McNally.
Chion Wolf WNPR

It's one of our great cultural mysteries: why we wake up teenagers -- the same one who sleep past noon on the weekends -- at six in the morning to get on a bus, and then we ask them to learn! 

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Springfield
8:16 am
Thu September 25, 2014

Opening Enrollment At UMass Springfield Exceeds Officials' Expectations

Gov.Deval Patrick leads a grand opening ceremony for the UMass Center at Springfield.

Originally published on Wed September 24, 2014 6:16 pm

University of Massachusetts officials say they are pleased with the initial enrollment at the system’s first satellite campus. They say it bodes well for the future of the new UMass Center at Springfield.  Governor Deval Patrick led officials today at a grand opening ceremony.                

   Governor Patrick, who was a key supporter of establishing the first UMass satellite campus in downtown Springfield, described it as a sign of hope at a time when the gap between rich and poor in Massachusetts is widening.

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Funding Education
11:19 am
Tue September 23, 2014

Connecticut Most Reliant State in U.S. on Property Taxes to Fund Public Education

The Connecticut Conference of Municipalities says a range of actions are needed by the state to address education funding issues.
Connecticut Conference of Municipalities

A new report by The Connecticut Conference of Municipalities says the state remains the most reliant in the nation on the property tax to fund pre-K to 12 public education. 

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Colleges
10:35 am
Tue September 23, 2014

Wesleyan Orders Fraternities to Become Coed

Wesleyan University announced that Greek life organizations, "women as well as men must be full members and well-represented in the body and leadership of the organization."
Credit Wesleyan University / Wikimedia Commons

Wesleyan University in Connecticut is ordering its fraternities and sororities to become coeducational within the next three years.

School President Michael Roth and trustees Chairman Joshua Boger sent a letter to the university community Monday informing them of the decision.

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Student Loan Debt
10:11 am
Fri September 19, 2014

With College Tuition Prices in Connecticut on the Rise, Can You Afford to Pay?

Getting through college is proving more and more challenging financially, according to a new report.
Bossi Creative Commons

A new report on student debt in Connecticut reveals the challenges students and their parents experience trying to pay for a college education.

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New Haven
10:55 am
Tue September 16, 2014

Islam Critic, Invited By Yale Group, Meets Protests

Ayyan Hirsi Ali.
American Enterprise Institute

A Muslim women's advocate critical of Islam has brought her message to Yale University, where she was warmly greeted by her audience, and by protests days earlier. 

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Pedestrian Safety
11:43 am
Fri September 12, 2014

Yale Crosswalk Awareness Influenced By Fab Four

http://ehs.yale.edu/Safety-Bulletin-September-2014

The Beatles’ 1969 Abbey Road album cover is the inspiration for a new Yale University campaign promoting pedestrian safety around campus. 

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Newtown
2:37 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

Design After Disaster: a New Sandy Hook School

Courtyard Perspective - "The projected 506 students will be distributed between three classroom wings, two of which are 2-stories, which extend like fingers of an open hand on the site."
Svigals + Partners Architects

The New Haven based  Svigals + Partners Architects have the challenging job of rebuilding Sandy Hook Elementary School, where 26 children and educators were murdered in December 2012. 

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WAMC News
11:58 am
Thu September 11, 2014

Springfield Declares Anti-bullying Weekend

The Carl Joseph Walker-Hoover Foundation was formed in 2010 to keep alive the memory of Carl who the previous year committed suicide at age 11 after suffering repeated bullying

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 6:26 pm

A number of activities to raise funds and awareness to combat bullying will take place this week in Springfield, Massachusetts, where the suicide five years ago of an 11-year- old student focused national attention on bullying in schools.

The Carl Joseph Walker-Hoover Foundation has scheduled a series of events that began Wednesday with a mayoral designation of the second weekend in September as “Anti-Bullying Weekend” in the city of Springfield. 

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Over-Testing
10:22 am
Tue September 9, 2014

Should Connecticut Students Spend Less Time Taking Tests?

Credit carlosbezz/iStock / Thinkstock

Governor Dannel Malloy wants to reduce the number of standardized tests taken by Connecticut students. In a letter to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, he offered a solution to cut down on all of the testing.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Mon September 8, 2014

School Start Times: Are Your Kids Getting Enough Sleep?

Daniel McNally.
Chion Wolf WNPR

It's one of our great cultural mysteries: why we wake up teenagers -- the same one who sleep past noon on the weekends -- at six in the morning to get on a bus, and then we ask them to learn! 

Read more
Standardized Testing
12:38 pm
Fri September 5, 2014

Malloy Looks to Reduce Time Connecticut Students Spend on Standardized Tests

Credit Alberto G. / Creative Commons

Appealing to the U.S. Secretary of Education, Governor Dannel Malloy is taking action to try to reduce the amount of time students in Connecticut spend taking standardized tests.

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