Karen Apricot / Creative Commons

Eric Vargas didn’t need help with his academics. He needed help, he said, finding himself.

"You don’t come onto campus just to get a job, you come on to campus to find yourself, so what are the resources that are going to help you do that," Vargas said at a conference held by the Center for Higher Education Retention Excellence at Central Connecticut State University.

In Rhode Island, Brown University has announced that it will use one-hundred million dollars to diversify its campus, to try to make the school more inclusive for students of color. This comes after weeks of protests over racial insensitivity on campuses across the country.

Brown University President Christina Paxson is out with a plan to address racial and class inequity on campus. 

Nicolas Raymond / Creative Commons

The Timothy Edwards Middle School in South Windsor canceled a field trip to Washington, D.C. for fear of the children’s safety. The decision came on the heels of the attacks in Paris that left 130 people dead. 

Jessica Hill / AP Photo

The 2011 consolidation of Connecticut’s regional and community colleges hasn’t worked out so well. Administrative costs have gone up, it’s still hard for students to transfer credits from community to four-year colleges, and the system faces budget deficits that will require painful cuts. But a new proposal calling for give backs from employees has unleashed a furious backlash. 

The number of international students studying at U.S. colleges and universities jumped last year — in a big way. It's up 10 percent, to roughly 975,000, according to a new report by the Institute of International Education and backed by the State Department.

In 2014-15, China was still the largest source of students with 31 percent of the total. India was in second place with nearly 14 percent. And Indian students were a big reason for the overall jump.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Yale University's president is announcing several changes in response to concerns expressed by students through demonstrations and meetings with university officials about the racial climate and diversity on campus.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

It was a chilly November day on Yale’s New Haven campus. Bulky headphones covered my ears, and a recorder dangled from a strap around my neck, connected to a big fluffy microphone.

Heading toward me on a sidewalk were several pairs of female students in athletic gear. The first few women were white, but there was a black woman in the last pair. I wanted to ask her about the climate on Yale’s campus, but I stopped myself. I imagined her being offended that I didn’t stop to ask her light-skinned peers the same question.

Charlie Smart / WHUS

Students and faculty at the University of Connecticut joined in a demonstration Monday speaking out against discrimination and intolerance on campus following the deadly attacks in Paris. 

David DesRoches / WNPR

A group of teenage boys hoist a red Columbia racing bike into the air, and lock it into place on a bike lift. They’re replacing the brake hoods – devices that house the thing you squeeze when you want to stop.

Muslim Coalition of Connecticut‎ / Facebook

An event this weekend in Hartford honors people and institutions of higher education that have worked to build bridges between Muslims and their larger community.

Erin Pettigrew / Creative Commons

Events this past week at Yale and the University of Missouri have sparked intense debate about the boundaries of free speech, and whether that debate is diverting the conversation away from a culture of racism at both schools that is not easily understood by those who don't live it.

Can we separate the fight against racism from the freedom to speak openly about it? Are we hurting students on the brink of adulthood if we protect them from exposure to the cruelties of life?

UMass-Amherst Protesters Want New Seal And Mascot

Nov 13, 2015
Kevin Roche

Some students at UMass Amherst want the university to change its mascot and seal, which they say are legacies of racism.

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

Just days after the University of Missouri's chancellor and the system president resigned under pressure from students, another college leader is facing a crucial moment.

School spokespeople often help a district in crisis. But they can also obscure facts just to avoid legal risk, and make it harder to sort out truth from spin, possibly interfering with the public's right to know.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Hundreds of Yale University students marched through campus on Monday afternoon against what they said is a hostile climate. 

JECO Photo / Creative Commons

Across the U.S., low-income, first-generation college students are not graduating at the same rate as some of their wealthier peers. 

Updated 6:10 p.m. ET

Amid continued pressure, the University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe and the chancellor of the Columbia campus, R. Bowen Loftin, both tendered their resignations on Monday.

Wolfe announced his resignation this morning and by late afternoon, Loftin had followed suit, saying he would leave his post as chancellor at the end of this year.

"I take full responsibility for this frustration, and I take full responsibility for the inaction that has occurred," Wolfe said.

About 30 University of Missouri football players have said they will not play another game until university system President Tim Wolfe steps down.

The football players said that they were standing in solidarity with the Concerned Student 1950 movement, which has for months now called on the university to seriously address systemic racism on campus.

The team tweeted a picture of the student athletes linking arms. "We are no longer taking it," the tweet said. "It's time to fight."

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A U.S. senator from Connecticut is calling for more oversight of managing toxic polychlorinated biphenyls in public schools. 

Matthew / Flickr Creative Commons

Across America, low-income, first generation college students are not graduating at the same rate as some of their wealthier peers. Coming up, we take a closer look at this trend with WAMU reporter Kavitha Cardoza. Her documentary is called “Lower Income, Higher Ed."  

University of Connecticut

Hartford's higher education leaders want to make the city a college town, and hope this will drive cultural and economic growth in the state’s capitol.

Martin Estey says more needs to be done to get students to live in and explore Hartford. 

Wikimedia User: Wasted Time R / Creative Commons

A fraternity at Quinnipiac University has been shut down due to hazing allegations for the second time this semester.

Awe ouens, zikhiphani daar?

That's South African slang for "Hey guys, what's up?"

We recently had a chance to find out what's up with the teens of South Africa.

Connecticut Commission on Children /

Connecticut was the first state in the nation to pass a law in 2014 that aims to help get kids ready for school by also focusing on their parents.

Connecticut students tested at about the same levels in math and reading as they did in 2013, according to results released by the National Assessment of Educational Progress, or NAEP. Fourth graders, however, tested worse this time around than they did two years ago.

Cross your fingers.

Congress is trying to do something it was supposed to do back in 2007: agree on a rewrite of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. It's not controversial to say the law is in desperate need of an update.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Hartford’s school board and city officials filed suit on Friday against Monsanto, seeking the multinational corporation's payment to remove toxic PCBs, or polychlorinated biphenyls, from Clark Elementary School.

Christopher Webb / Creative Commons

The initial investigation into an assortment of violent threats involving Fairfield schools led police to determine that the threats were either a hoax or were possibly abandoned.  

The national charter school movement is growing - 2.5 million students are attending roughly 6,000 charter schools.

Another 1 million students are on wait lists.

Still, there are issues: charter schools overall receive less funding than traditional public schools and are located primarily in urban areas, limiting access to students in rural communities.