Education

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Kent is a small town. Like other small towns, it doesn't have a police force. Residents rely on state troopers.

That's part of the reason why Selectman Jeffrey Parkin wants to arm school personnel. He said it could be the difference between life and death if someone walks into a school and starts shooting.

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The University of Connecticut is creating a living and learning community for black men in response to low graduation and retention rates among the school's male African-American students.

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Lisa Rosengrant lost her hearing when she was three. She's now a college student, and she can hear somewhat with the help of hearing aids. But she still has trouble taking notes in class.

Recent government sanctions against predatory for-profit colleges that preyed on veterans by using inflated job promises have opened the window on the wider challenges of helping veterans transition from service to higher education.

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The state’s largest teaching union criticized the current guidelines for teacher evaluations in Connecticut at a press conference on Monday, calling for changes to a system that the organization said puts too much emphasis on standardized test scores -- and not enough on classroom learning.

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The new Islamic law center at Yale University opened last fall, and it's beginning this year with a speaker from the University of Chicago, Ahmed El Shamsy.

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A  new study shows few low-income Connecticut students earn bachelor degrees within six years of transferring from a community college. 

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Students graduating from Glastonbury High School will wear the same color of gowns regardless of gender for the first time in over 60 years.

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Superintendents across Connecticut have put together a document they say will help schools deal with student mental health issues. The recommendations were influenced by the events that led up to the Newtown school shootings.

President Obama used his final State of the Union address Tuesday night to reflect on his legacy. But he also put forth some specific proposals for his remaining year in office. And the very first one was "helping students learn to write computer code."

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Which constitutional rights are more important than others?

That’s the question Judge Thomas Moukawsher is essentially asking lawyers to answer, as he hears arguments from the Connecticut Coalition for Justice in Education Funding. The coalition claims the state has failed to provide an adequate education to all students.  

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The University of Connecticut has announced plans to award an additional $5,000 annually to students from Hartford public schools who meet certain academic and attendance goals. 

Connecticut's largest teachers union wants state lawmakers and the governor to replace a controversial standardized test administered to students in grades three through eight.

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Connecticut made "far more progress than anyone ever expected" in 2015 on improving the state's transportation infrastructure, Governor Dannel Malloy said on Monday.

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A long-time education leader said that the best way to desegregate schools in the Hartford region is to invest in urban centers.

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An upcoming lawsuit is set to determine whether Connecticut should provide all students with access to preschool. 

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Advocates for the deaf are concerned that officials at Northwestern Connecticut Community College are slowly phasing out a program that helps deaf and hard-of-hearing students. But school officials claim nothing has changed.

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The national conversations about race and racism; police and African Americans; free speech on college campuses; “safe spaces” and hate speech and political correctness have all come together in very interesting and interlocked ways here in Connecticut recently.

Eric Westervelt of the NPR Ed team is guest-hosting for the next few weeks on Here & Now, the midday news program from NPR and WBUR.

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The University of Connecticut's Board of Trustees has raised tuition by more than 30 percent over four years.

Los Angeles public schools will reopen on Wednesday after an emailed threat caused officials to cancel classes on Tuesday.

Authorities haven't given details of the threat but school Superintendent Ramon Cortines said the text referred to "backpacks, talked about other packages."

School Board President Steve Zimmer said at a news conference Tuesday evening that teams from numerous law enforcement agencies had searched 1,531 school properties and decided that it is safe to reopen. Mayor Eric Garcetti said the FBI has determined the threat is not credible.

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College professors say that the state's higher education system is not employing enough full-time teachers. And some professors claim this has caused the full-time faculty to look down on their adjunct colleagues. 

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School evaluations of teachers are currently not made public. But a former school board member in New Milford wants to change that, and has taken the issue to the state's Freedom of Information Commission.

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Faculty at Connecticut's state universities are negotiating with the Board of Regents over a new three-year contract. Last month the new president of the Board, Mark Ojakian joined us to discuss the negotiations from his perspective. This hour, we hear from several of the professors pushing back against cuts and other changes in the public higher education system.

President Obama called it "a Christmas miracle. A bipartisan bill signing right here."

The "right here" was the South Court Auditorium, part of the White House complex. More importantly, the bipartisan bill being signed was the Every Student Succeeds Act — a long-overdue replacement of the unpopular federal education law known as No Child Left Behind.

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Washington lawmakers passed the long-debated education bill that minimizes the federal government's role in public education.

The U.S. Senate is expected to vote as soon as Wednesday on replacing the nation's big education law, known since 2001 as No Child Left Behind.

And President Obama is expected to sign the new version, ending an era marked by bitter fights between the federal government, states and schools.

So as it dies, we thought an obituary was in order.

Yup, an obituary. Because the law's critics and defenders all agree on one thing: No Child Left Behind took on a life of its own.

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Connecticut students who learn English as a second language drop out of high school at a rate higher than any other New England state, according to an analysis by the New England Secondary School Consortium

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The Connecticut Board of Regents for Higher Education is taking a step toward possibly allowing armed security on all state community college campuses. 

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Roughly 100 college students and professors gathered in Hartford on Thursday to protest proposed changes to the state's higher education system.

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