Arts and Culture

Updated at 12:50 p.m. ET

The Trump administration has announced that the U.S. will withdraw from UNESCO, the United Nations' chief cultural and educational agency. In a statement released Thursday, the State Department said the move won't take effect for more than a year, noting the withdrawal will be as of Dec. 31, 2018.

Hatim Kaghat / Creative Commons

Until about 150 years ago, most people  were born into a religion that carried them to adulthood. That's no longer the case. 

Facing increasing pressure for how it's chosen to handle the legacy of a children's book author with a mixed record on issues of race and prejudice, the new Dr. Seuss Museum in Springfield, Mass., has acknowledged a change is needed.

It's not often you'll find these 24 names in the same place. They are historians and musicians, computer scientists and social activists, writers and architects. But whatever it may read on their business cards (if they've even got business cards), they now all have a single title in common: 2017 MacArthur Fellow.

AJ Zanyk / Creative Commons

It's been 60 years since singer Harry Belafonte released The Banana Boat Song (Day-O) on vinyl. He had spent much of his youth in Jamaica and has said he chose to sing the traditional island work song as a way to challenge negative cultural assumptions about people of the Caribbean.

An Ode To Yodeling

Oct 10, 2017
Irina Slutsky / flickr

What is yodeling, anyway? Some consider it singing, some say it's an ululation, and still others consider it merely a means to herd animals. Whatever yodeling is, one's thing clear: Yodeling has been around for thousands of years and shows no signs of disappearing.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Hartford Symphony Orchestra's music director Carolyn Kuan became a U.S. citizen on Saturday.

CBS Interactive

It's a good time to be a Star Trek fan... inasmuch as there's a bunch of new Star Trek-related content, anyway. CBS has a real-live, brand-new Star Trek TV series... that you can't actually watch on CBS. And Seth MacFarlane a has real-live Star Trek parody series that's maybe more of an homage? Or it's a real-live Star Trek homage series that's maybe more of a parody? One of those. Or maybe both?

The Nose weighs in on both Star Trek: Discovery and The Orville.

Kevin Dooley / flickr creative commons

It was 50 years ago that The Beatles released Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. It's been called the beginning of the album era. In 2003, Rolling Stone ranked it #1 on their "500 Greatest Albums of All Time." It is the best-selling album of the 1960s.

Lulu_Sunset / flickr

Mischief and mirth abound in the magical realm of fairies. Whether it's Puck from Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream or J.M Barrie's Tinkerbell, you never know quite what you'll get from these fictional creatures.

Chris Gladis

I’m Chion Wolf and this is What’s Your Problem?!

Since Colin McEnroe is away, I’m taking over with a radio version of my live advice show, What’s Your Problem? Here’s the idea: A lot of people love GIVING and GETTING advice. There’s a connection there, there’s a feeling that you’re LESS ALONE there.

Princeton University Office of Communications

John McPhee is a writer's writer. He's thought of as one of the progenitors of the New Journalism, of creative nonfiction or narrative nonfiction, along with people like Gay Talese and Tom Wolfe and Hunter S. Thompson. But his style is... quiter than those folks'. His writing is transparent. He tends to keep himself out of the narrative. He doesn't even, in fact, have an author photo.

Hugh Hefner created Playboy at his kitchen table in Chicago. The magazine was blamed for (or credited with) setting off a cultural revolution in America, but within a few years Hefner was branded a male chauvinist. He was a proponent of free speech and a champion of civil rights who was decried as a merchant of smut.

Hefner died Wednesday at the age of 91, the magazine announced in a statement, writing that he "peacefully passed away today from natural causes at his home, The Playboy Mansion, surrounded by loved ones."

Frank C. Muller / Flickr

In the 1800s, Connecticut peddlers would travel south to peddle goods made in small factories around the state. The best way to increase their profit margin was to slip a few pieces of prized nutmeg -- and a few fake wooden ones to match -- in their bag. It didn't take long to expose the fraud, earning us the nickname of the Nutmeg State, known by all as clever, if ethically challenged, people.