Arts/Culture

The Faith Middleton Show
11:53 am
Tue September 16, 2014

Identity: Who Are You if You No Longer Do Your Job?

Credit Kristin Wall/flickr creative commons

Extraordinary numbers of people are about to join the ranks of the unemployed—by choice. They're about to retire. (Of course some are forced to give up work because of illness, injury, or a major change in circumstances.)

No matter how it occurs, who are you after you can no longer continue in work that in many ways has given you your sense of identity, what you say you are when you meet someone… a detective, judge, reporter, florist, teacher, bus driver.

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:44 am
Mon September 15, 2014

How to Protect and Grow Your Money

Credit Dave Dugdale/flickr creative commons

While more people are saving, a startling number of people have no pensions or savings as they head toward retirement years. If you are lucky enough to have investments, the key question for our show is, how do we protect and grow our assets at the same time? Too conservative means you miss the gains; too risky means you can lose a bundle if the market sinks, and never make it up if retirement is near.

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Code Switch
5:40 am
Sat September 13, 2014

Why Michael Che's New Role Could Change More Than 'SNL'

Daily Show correspondent Michael Che will become the first black co-anchor of Saturday Night Live's Weekend Update.
Paul Marotta Courtesy of Michael Che

Originally published on Sat September 13, 2014 1:27 pm

It seems some TV networks have gotten the message on late-night diversity and others have not.

Friday's news — that Saturday Night Live hired comic Michael Che to join Colin Jost behind the anchor desk on its popular "Weekend Update" segment — shows NBC's venerated late night comedy franchise may, finally, stand among those in the first group.

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History
12:57 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

Samplers and School Supplies: Back to School in Colonial Connecticut

Hornbook. This reproduction hornbook is on view in the exhibition "Making Connecticut" at the Connecticut Historical Society.
Connecticut Historical Society

It’s back to school season in Connecticut. The school buses are out, Labor Day has come and gone, and stores are full of families shopping for new clothes and school supplies. While children today are looking for new binders and markers, children growing up in colonial Connecticut would have had school supplies of a very different kind.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:22 am
Fri September 12, 2014

The Nose Refuses to Grow Up

Theresa Cramer is a writer and the editor of E-Content Magazine, where she covers the world of digital media
Chion Wolf WNPR

"Comic book movies, family-friendly animated adventures, tales of adolescent heroism, and comedies of arrested development do not only make up the commercial center of 21st century Hollywood, they are its artistic heart." So writes critic A.O. Scott in a somewhat controversial essay from this week. We will discuss cultural immaturity on this episode of The Nose.

Then, we'll probe the delicate subject of "Fingerprint Words". The premise is that each of us has a word or two - a perfectly good word which we use correctly - that we use a lot. One of mine, I happen to know, is "warranted". I also know where I got it, and to whom I have spread it.

Finally, we'll explore reports that eating cereal is in steep decline. An entire civilization of elves and leprechauns now teeters at the edge of extinction. How about you? Has your perfectly warranted retreat from maturity caused you to give up cereal?

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Fri September 12, 2014

Celebrating the Arts: The Role and Importance of Arts Education

eddie welker Creative Commons

Back in 2010, a resolution was passed by U.S. House of Representatives making the second week of September "Arts in Education Week" -- a week designed to spotlight the role and importance of the arts in our schools. 

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The Faith Middleton
12:45 pm
Thu September 11, 2014

The Book Show: September 11, 2014

Credit Jedediah Laub-Klein/flickr creative commons

Faith's motto on The Book Show is: Life is short, but it can be ever so wide.

Join Faith and her book buddies for a call-in show recommending terrific books to read in all categories. If you're in a book club, please tell us what you've read and enjoyed.

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Metcalf on Music
9:15 am
Thu September 11, 2014

Connecticut’s Changing, Sometimes Volatile, Still Lively Classical Music Scene

The Hartford Symphony Orchestra, Hartford Chorale, and soloists led by HSO Music Director Carolyn Kuan.
hartfordsymphonyblog.com

The good people at WNPR recently asked me if I would be interested in writing a weekly online piece about classical music for their website. Last December, they had started running a weekly piece on jazz by my old Hartford Courant colleague and friend, the great Owen McNally. What they wanted, they said, was a sort of companion piece to Owen’s.

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Slow Dancing
5:50 am
Thu September 11, 2014

Yale's Cross Campus Turns Into Massive Slow-Motion Art Installation

Bill T. Jones is co-founder of the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company. He is also one of the 43 dancers featured in "Slow Dancing".
David Michalek

For the next several days, Yale's Cross Campus will transform into a giant work of art after dark with the installation of David Michalek's "Slow Dancing."

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Television
2:12 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

3 Roosevelts Come Alive In PBS Documentary, Ken Burns' Best Yet

In this undated photo, Theodore Roosevelt waves to a crowd.
Library of Congress

Originally published on Wed September 10, 2014 3:28 pm

Franklin Delano Roosevelt delivered his most resonant and famous line during his presidential inauguration speech of 1933: "So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief, that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself." It was resonant because he was being defiant, and optimistic, in the face of the Great Depression — and it was famous because it was broadcast live, to the entire nation, on the relatively new medium of radio.

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Jazz Corridor
1:15 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

Hartford Jazz Society Launches Its Annual Riverboat Ramble on the Connecticut River

Bassist Nat Reeves performing in Hartford last July. Reeves is headlining the Hartford Jazz Society's annual riverboat cruise.
Maurice Robertson Hartford Jazz Society

For more than a half-century, the Hartford Jazz Society’s annual riverboat ramble on the Connecticut River—the state’s biggest, longest-running, most celebratory floating jazz concert—consistently features indelible shipboard solos that might forever dwell in your nostalgic jazz memory bank.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:27 am
Wed September 10, 2014

JFK Conspiracy Theories: American As Apple Pie

Patrick Nolan is a forensic historian, freelance writer and the author of "CIA Rogues and the Killing of the Kennedys: How and Why US Agents Conspired to Assassinate JFK and RFK."
Chion Wolf

The JFK assassination is like the Maine coastline: craggy, uneven, full of serration, points, inlands, islands, amenable to endless exploration and quickly obscured by sudden fogs. There are so many side trips and any one of them is a potential life's work.

Let me give you some examples.

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:05 am
Wed September 10, 2014

Food Schmooze: Moist, Crispy Meatloaf Baked in a Brown Paper Bag

Credit Credit Justin Smith/flickr creative commons

We have the vintage recipe, Meatloaf Baked in A Brown Paper bag, so moist, so crispy. City Steam Brewery designed a delicious beer, lemonade martini for The Food Schmooze called the Shand-tini. 

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The Faith Middleton Show
1:18 pm
Tue September 9, 2014

Remembering Great Books

Credit David Masters/flickr creative commons

If you're in search of great reads, here's a list to get you started. Gina Barreca joins Faith to talk about the books many of us have forgotten about.  

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:39 am
Tue September 9, 2014

Beyond Conjunction Junction: A Conversation with Bob Dorough

Bob Dorough.
Credit Mind Meal / Wikimedia Commons

You're about to meet a very special guy. There's a good chance you already know him, if you were in the generational cohort whose lives were enriched by Schoolhouse Rock. More than any other person, Bob Dorough put his unique musical stamp on that show and its offerings. But Bob Dorough is so much more.

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:48 am
Mon September 8, 2014

Tips on Animal Care: September 8, 2014

Credit Kerri Lee Smith/flickr creative commons

Barking, fleas, Lyme disease, pet food, biting, housebreaking, shyness, pet insurance, animal rescue. Top flight advice from vet Dr. Todd Friedland. Don't miss his adventures with animals of all kinds.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:22 am
Mon September 8, 2014

An Interview With Sir Tom Stoppard

Cplin McEnroe with Sir Tom Stoppard
Chion Wolf

Life is full of peculiar ironies and thus, Tom Stoppard, quite possibly the most most dizzyingly proficient writer of the English tongue did not grow up speaking English.  to college. He is, to use his old joke, a bounced check. He grew up in Czechoslovakia and spoke that language until the age of three-and-one half, or perhaps five.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
1:06 pm
Fri September 5, 2014

Sumptuous Silence

Marie Coppola is an assistant professor of psychology and linguistics at the University of Connecticut where she directs the Language Creation Lab. She’s also the founder and Executive Director of Manos Unidas
Chion Wolf

Imagine having no capacity for language acquisition. Imagine developing a language with grammars that are completely independent from the spoken language of the surrounding hearing culture.

Imagine being unable to engage in any of the thought processes I'm using right now: Choosing words, and bundles of words, to convey meaning, and pausing to ponder the interesting similarities between deafness and deficit; or grabbing for a phrase like "language acquisition" and appreciating the neat little package it represents. 

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Technology
12:56 pm
Fri September 5, 2014

So, Are You Working On Your Novel? Or Tweeting About Your Novel?

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon September 8, 2014 10:33 am

If you spend enough time on Twitter, you've probably run across tweets from people who are ostensibly writing a novel but manage to leave a digital trail that indicates they may be doing anything but:

Artist and computer programmer Cory Arcangel started noticing these aspirational tweets and began collecting them in his @WrknOnMyNovel Twitter feed. He's now curated that collection into a book called Working on My Novel.

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History
12:51 pm
Fri September 5, 2014

The Sporty Katharine Hepburn

Katharine Hepburn on set with Spencer Tracy.
Courtesy of the Judy Samelson Collection. The Connecticut Historical Society

Katharine Hepburn relished wearing slacks at a time when most women would never consider such a clothing item as an every-day element of their wardrobes. Although Hepburn’s choices were unusual at the time, the idea of sportswear was becoming more and more popular. American designers began creating clothing made from knits with the primary purpose being comfort, practicality, and ease of movement.  Pants were designed but not widely adopted outside the home, until  Hepburn along with some of her more liberal minded contemporaries made pants chic.

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Language
10:28 am
Fri September 5, 2014

Where Have All The Poets Gone?

Critic Juan Vidal wonders why so few modern poets pack the punch of Allen Ginsberg, Pablo Neruda or Amiri Baraka.
Michael Stroud Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 5, 2014 2:48 pm

For centuries, poets were the mouthpieces railing loudly against injustice. They gave voice to the hardships and evils facing people everywhere. From Langston Hughes to Jack Kerouac and Federico García Lorca — so many — verse once served as a vehicle for expressing social and political dissent. There was fervor, there was anger. And it was embraced: See, there was a time when the poetry of the day carried with it the power of newspapers and radio programs. It was effective, even as it was overtly political. What has happened?

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Remembrance
4:01 pm
Thu September 4, 2014

Joan Rivers, An Enduring Comic Who Turned Tragedy Into Showbiz Success, Dies

Rivers became permanent guest host for The Tonight Show in 1983, a gig that ended when she left to host her own late-night show on Fox. Here she interviews Miss America Suzette Charles in 1984.
AP

Originally published on Fri September 5, 2014 6:49 am

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:00 am
Thu September 4, 2014

The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: From Comics to CGI

Sam Hatch
Chion Wolf

Let me begin with a confession.  I'm part of a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle valley. I was too old for them when they made their debut in the mid-1980's and my son, born in 1989 missed their big wave and went straight to the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, the kid craze that finally bumped the turtles out of the spotlight. 

But, those Rangers are gone. And, for that matter, so is Pikachu.

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Spotlight on the Arts
9:10 am
Thu September 4, 2014

Yale Educator-Artist Keeps Inspiring Future Generations of Theater Designers

Ming Cho Lee.
Mark Ostow

At age 83, Ming Cho Lee knows the difference between a world that works and one that doesn’t, certainly when it comes to the stage. For the past six decades, the National Medal of Arts recipient and Tony Award winner has conjured up some of the most memorable scenic worlds of the American theater.

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Technology
5:01 am
Thu September 4, 2014

The Myth Of The Private Naked Selfie

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu September 4, 2014 12:19 pm

Apple's iCloud hack involving nude photos of celebrities is different from many of the other hacks we've heard about. When hackers steal credit cards — like with Target or allegedly now with Home Depot — the expense falls on the retailer and the banks. And these companies can cancel and replace credit card numbers to contain the damage.

But in this case involving Apple, just about all the damage falls on the user, like actress Kirsten Dunst. And you can't take back the images. They're out there forever.

Here are some questions we thought you might be asking:

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:49 am
Wed September 3, 2014

Food Schmooze: Grilled Lemony Lamb Chops

Credit Stijn Nieuwendijk/flickr creative commons

On this fresh edition of The Food Schmooze, we give you the recipe for grilled lemony lamb chops from The Calories In, Calories Out Cookbook. The authors tell you how much you have to walk or run for every low calorie dish.

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Jazz Corridor
10:36 am
Wed September 3, 2014

Willie Ruff, Jazz Eminence and Master Storyteller, Tells All at Yale Art Gallery

Willie Ruff.
Vincent Oneppo

Willie Ruff, the celebrated French horn player and double bassist, venerable Yale School of Music professor, founder/director of Yale’s prestigious Duke Ellington Fellowship Program, award-winning author, documentarian, historian, linguist, ethnomusicologist, and voracious autodidact, is a man of so many intricate, smoothly running, coolly calibrated cerebral parts that he is, indeed, one of the jazz world’s true Renaissance figures.

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Overshare
3:36 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

Netflix Looks for Ways Users Can Share Habits Selectively on Facebook

Gabriela Pinto Creative Commons

Perhaps you've seen an option on Netflix, the video rental and streaming company, to share your movie watching habits with others via Facebook. Did you opt in? Like many people, perhaps you didn't. 

Netflix is now trying something new that it hopes will work better to let you share viewing interests with your social circle. 

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The Faith Middleton Show
12:05 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

The Smithsonian's History of America in 101 Objects

Credit Tadson Bussey/flickr creative commons

A chair… letter… diary… clock… coin… jewel… car… house… meat grinder… what makes a family heirloom have powerful meaning, even if it has little monetary value? That question will be answered when you read The Smithsonian's History of America in 101 Objects by Richard Kurin.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:27 am
Tue September 2, 2014

The Scramble: What's Wrong with Connecticut Besides John Rowland

Credit Anthony Calabrese / Wikimedia Commons

Today's Scramble leads off with Annie Lowrey, who tackles a subject that's been dominating a lot of conversations around here lately. What's the matter with Connecticut? is the question Annie Lowrey asks in her weekend essay for New York Magazine. ​​Is there a collective malaise and is it based on economic factors? Annie notes that Connecticut has somehow managed to become both the richest and poorest economy in America--at the same time.

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