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Chion Wolf / WNPR

Photographer Christopher Capozziello started taking pictures of his brother Nick before he was a professional photographer. The pictures became a way to deal with having a twin brother who suffers in ways Chris does not.  

In the mid-1960s, Larry Kane was a young, straight-arrow radio news guy who lucked into what had to be the greatest assignment in the history of rock: flying from show to show with The Beatles. Ron Howard's new documentary, Eight Days a Week: The Touring Years, follows the band through their early years on tour. It also features Kane, the reporter who got to ride along when The Beatles traveled through the U.S. in 1964.

USA Network

The cyberpunk subgenre of science fiction emerged in the '70s and '80s with books like Neuromancer and movies like Blade Runner set in the early 21st century in a world full of high tech and lowlifes, in a society divided and unequal, dominated by mega corporations, where the lines between actual reality and virtual reality have started to blur.

Sound familiar?

Michael Schlüter

If you’re looking for a cool cornucopia of high-quality, live guitar music, check out The Connecticut Guitar Society’s 2016-2017 season. It's stocked with eight concerts bristling with genre-bending, premier players inventing on everything from Bach and bop to bluegrass and flamenco and beyond.

Between his bands The White Stripes, The Raconteurs and The Dead Weather, as well as his more recent solo work, Jack White has won 12 Grammy awards and sold millions of albums.

FX Networks

Barbra Streisand's new album dropped two weeks ago. It's an album of duets with . . . actors. Babs and her famous friends sing . . . show tunes. To my mind, that's the makings of a pretty huge disaster (or even a completely ignored disaster). Instead, Streisand's Encore: Movie Friends Sing Broadway is the number one album in the country.

John Atashian / Judy Dworin Performance Project, Inc.

Life after prison presents multiple challenges as ex-offenders re-enter society. 

Long Wharf Theater

This weekend, New Haven's Long Wharf Theater will become a laboratory of sorts, with staged readings of three new plays by three up-and-coming young playwrights. The Contemporary American Voices Festival gives theatergoers the chance to see cutting edge new works for the stage by accomplished young playwrights.

JD Hancock / flickr creative commons

At 8:30 pm on Thursday, September 8, 1966, NBC aired the premiere of a new series called "Star Trek". The episode was "The Man Trap." The star date was 1513.1, in case you're interested in that kind of thing.

I am not interested in that kind of thing.

"The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" / ABC Photo Archives

The death of Hugh O’Brian last week has put me in a nostalgic mood for the great TV Westerns of yesteryear.

Wleedooh-k-H / Flickr

Horror films have been scaring audiences for over a hundred years. And in all that time, some things have never changed: Year after year, the collective fears of society have been reflected in gruesome detail on the big screen and women -- usually blond women -- scream bloody murder as their knife-wielding killers approach.

Jay Corey

Listen to alto saxophonist Kris Allen’s splendid, new CD, Beloved, and you might well hear in his rich, expressive playing, evocations of but never imitations of Jackie McLean’s searing, soulful sound or Ornette Coleman’s profound, plaintively moving lyricism. 

Ash & James Photography / The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra

Arts administrators don’t often get the chance to communally reflect on their precarious profession, but on Saturday, September 17, the University of Hartford will host an event that is informally being billed as an arts summit.

Diane Sobolewski / Goodspeed Musicals

Broadway musicals are, by design, a feast for the senses. But for many people on the autism spectrum, the bright lights, loud music, and lavish costumes can cause sensory overload.

Sublime99 / Flickr

Bill Murray has been involved with some of our favorite movies of all time: Caddyshack, Ghostbusters, Moonrise Kingdom, and so many more. He doesn't like managers or agents and rumor has it, once agreed to play Garfield because he thought it was a Coen Brothers film.

Maurice Robertson

A king-size floating concert, festive party, picnic and delightful sight-seeing tour along the scenic Connecticut River Valley, the Hartford Jazz Society’s celebratory riverboat ramble weighs anchor on Saturday, September 10 at 11:30 am from the State Pier at Haddam.

wikimedia Commons

Gene Wilder, the iconic actor who starred in "Blazing Saddles," "Young Frankenstein," and "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory," died at his home in Stamford, Connecticut on Sunday. He was 83.

Wilder's nephew said he passed away from complications from Alzheimer's disease.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Editor's note: Gene Wilder died Sunday at his home in Stamford, Connecticut. In 2014, WNPR's Jeff Cohen reported on a screening of "Blazing Saddles" with Wilder in attendance, followed by a Q&A with the actor. This was first published on October 30, 2014.

It's been 40 years since the release of the Mel Brooks' movie Blazing Saddles. I recently went to an anniversary screening and in the audience was one of the movie's stars: Gene Wilder.

Typically superheroes spend their summertime helming big budget franchises for movie studios. This year, with blockbuster season winding down and schools opening their doors, Marvel's following up its summer at the multiplex by giving its superheroes a new assignment.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Hartford’s Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art is now offering free admission to all city residents. The program is called the Wadsworth Welcome. 

Anne Hudson / The Ivoryton Playhouse

After a four-year gestation period, and more than a year's worth of delays, Frank Ocean's second studio album dropped last weekend. There are two different versions of the album: a physical version that was only available in pop-up shops in four cities last Saturday and the currently iTunes-exclusive digital version. The album is called Blonde, but the cover says "Blond." And there's a separate, different video album, Endless, that was released last Friday. It's all very complicated. The Nose gets into it.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut is home to many historic landmarks -- among them is the former residence of American architect and icon Philip Johnson. Since it opened to the public in 2007, Johnson's Glass House has welcomed thousands of visitors from across the country and around the world. 

If you've seen Sleeping Beauty, The Jungle Book or the Toy Story movies, you've seen the work of animator Floyd Norman; for decades, he has helped bring Disney and Pixar classics to life.

Now 81, Norman still works for Disney, where he has plied his trade, on and off, since he became the studio's first African-American animator in the 1950s.

Davis Dunavin / WSHU

There are questions that might stump even the most dedicated country music fan: Who kickstarted the country music industry in the 1920s, even before big names like Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family? And why is this Texas musician buried in Bridgeport, Connecticut?

His name was Vernon Dalhart, and he released some of the best-selling records of the era, including “The Prisoner’s Song.”

Scholastic, Inc.

Filmmaker and producer Morton Schindel died last week at the age of 98. For decades, Schindel's film innovations faithfully brought to life some of the most beloved children's books of all time from his Weston, Connecticut studio.

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