Arts/Culture

The Colin McEnroe Show
7:37 pm
Sat March 5, 2011

Wolfie's Songs!

History
2:26 pm
Sat March 5, 2011

“The Great White Hurricane” of 1888

As Connecticut emerges from beneath the record amounts of snow left by a series of storms that started in December and continued into February, residents should temper their relief with caution. For it was in the middle of March that the most massive and destructive snowstorm in New England history struck: the Blizzard of 1888.

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Paper Trails
11:10 pm
Fri March 4, 2011

Paper Trails: Back to School to Re-read Feminist Classics

As an 17-year-old freshwoman at Barnard College, Stephanie Staal took a survey class in which she read Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, Betty Friedan — great feminist classics. Over a decade later, 100 percent older, she decided to return to Barnard to re-take the class, and re-read those books. She wanted to see if they meant something more, or different, to her now that she was a wife, a mother, and a thirtysomething.

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Dance
5:25 pm
Fri March 4, 2011

Clone of B-Boys Hit Up the Suburbs at Battle Royale, 2011 Winter Edition

Michelle Lee

While the quaint, nearly empty road of Main Street stood quietly on a cold, snowy Saturday evening, one spot was waiting to be packed with energy. At Vinnie’s Jump and Jive Community Dance Hall, a classic urban event was about to take place: Battle Royale 2011 Winter Edition, a break-dance tournament.

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The Faith Middleton Show
5:23 pm
Fri March 4, 2011

Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho

 Renowned film critic David Thomson plumbs the horror and inspiration of Alfred Hitchcock’s greatest film.

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The Faith Middleton Show
5:22 pm
Fri March 4, 2011

Cop in the Hood

The Faith Middleton Show
5:16 pm
Fri March 4, 2011

Maintaining Independence as You Grow Older

creative common; Adam Jones, Ph.D.

As life expectancy in the United States continues to rise, the maintenance of physical independence among older Americans has emerged as a major clinical and public health priority.  The ability to move without assistance, is a fundamental feature of human functioning. Older people who lose mobility are less likely to remain in the community, have higher rates of morbidity, mortality, and hospitalizations and experience a poorer quality of life.  

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:32 pm
Fri March 4, 2011

The Nose: We Can't Stop Talking About Charlie Sheen

Wikimedia Commons

Should we even talk about Charlie Sheen on public radio? As an essayist in Slate pointed out this week, public radio listeners tend to write letters of complaint when NPR covers Justin Bieber, Ken and Barbie, Tiger Woods, Michael Jackson, rappers, Levi Johnston, Mel Gibson, heavy metal or sports. 

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Where We Live
10:49 am
Fri March 4, 2011

Controversial High School Theater, Worthy Risks?

Last weekend the Waterbury Arts Magnet School performed the Tony award-winning Joe Turner’s Come and Gone by the Pulitzer prize-winner August Wilson – a celebrated play that was first staged in1984 at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center in Waterford, Connecticut.

The play almost didn’t happen, though.  A month ago, production was temporarily stopped, when questions were raised about the frequent use of a racially charged slang term…the so called “n-word.” 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
4:47 pm
Thu March 3, 2011

Romeo & Juliet Is Timeless

Chion Wolf

Twenty years ago, Connecticut was held in thrall by the murder conspiracy trial of Karin Aparo in connection with the murder of Karin's mother Joyce. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:57 pm
Wed March 2, 2011

Colin McEnroe Show: Jam With Connecticut's State Troubadour And Poet

Chion Wolf

Connecticut, unique among all states, has both a state poet laureate and a state troubadour. The first state poet laureate was James Merrill, appointed in the mid-1980s. Merrill graciously accepted the honor but said it was unlikely he would be writing poems for state occasions like, he said, the governor's birthday. Boy, was that an understatement.

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:29 pm
Tue March 1, 2011

Food Schmooze: Grilled Cheese

creative commons, kthread

Grilled Cheese

Ingredients: 

  • Bread – country white, seeded rye, potato bread or whole wheat

  • Cheese – sharp, Extra Sharp or your favorite cheese

  • Toppings – Caramelized onions, sautéed crimini mushrooms, sliced tomato, sliced pickles, sliced prosciutto, crispy bacon, truffle oil, or any of your favorite toppings.

  1. Two slices of your favorite bread open faced.

  2. Cover each slice with your favorite cheese.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:37 pm
Tue March 1, 2011

What To Do With Connecticut's Most Famous Hobo?

Wikimedia Commons

As much as we romanticize the Leatherman, Connecticut's most famous vagabond, we should remember too that the post Civil War era -- his era -- was a time of tramp laws, meant to discourage exactly the sort of person he was.

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The Faith Middleton Show
9:56 pm
Mon February 28, 2011

How Pleasure Works

Yale psychologist Paul Bloom presents a striking and thought-provoking new understanding of pleasure, desire, and value.

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The Needle Drop
4:23 pm
Mon February 28, 2011

Dance Music Remixes, Gloom, and Doom

This week on The Needle Drop, we explore new albums from PJ Harvey and Toro Y Moi. We've also got a nice handful of remixes, and an introduction to the band Balkans.

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History
10:36 am
Sat February 26, 2011

Petticoats Revealed and Concealed: 1740 to 1840

In 1758, Sarah Halsey spent countless hours quilting a beautiful petticoat.  But why spend so much time on a garment that no one will see?  The term petticoat has evolved over time and began by referring to a skirt when separate from the bodice.  As a result, there are two types of petticoats: under petticoats (unseen) and petticoats (seen).  Sarah Halsey’s petticoat fits into the second category, those meant to be seen.  Everyone she passed could marvel at her skills with needle and thread.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:44 pm
Fri February 25, 2011

The Nose: Oscar Roundup 2010 - What Were Your Favorites?

Flickr Creative Commons, Dave_B_

The movie that had the biggest impact on the Academy Awards over the last ten years is one that did not win best picture ... or even get nominated - it was  "The Dark Knight," Christopher Nolan's 2008 Batman movie that was shunned in 2009.

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Paper Trails
2:38 pm
Fri February 25, 2011

Paper Trails: the Very Weird Fiction of Victor LaValle

Victor LaValle is the author of Big Machine, his second novel, and the his first one about a secret African American society headquartered in the Vermont woods, where they rescue junkies, alcoholics, and criminals and set them to work as quasi-superheroes looking to save the world.

On this episode of Paper Trails, the public radio show about books, LaValle faces down our panel of hosts Mark Oppenheimer and Brian Francis Slattery and their guest novelist Gregory Feeley.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:05 am
Fri February 25, 2011

Michael Kramer On Art, Politics And Theater

Michael Kramer was an award-winning political columnist for Time and New York magazine. Now he’s the playwright behind “Divine Rivalry,” a show about da Vinci and Michaelangelo, making its world premier in Hartford. We’ll talk politics and art.

Chion Wolf and Colin will also read your e-mails in "The Sack," our weekly mailbag feature.

Leave your comments below, e-mail colin@wnpr.org or Tweet us @wnprcolin.

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The Faith Middleton Show
6:43 am
Fri February 25, 2011

The Book Show

creative commons, libookperson

To see a complete list of the books discused on this show, go to R.J. Julia.

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:40 am
Thu February 24, 2011

Long Distance

creative commons, jonwick04

A new edition of a classic McKibben book about what it takes to be a world-class athlete and where the true meaning of endurance can be found.

At 37, the celebrated writer and environmentalist Bill McKibben took a break from the life of the mind to put himself to the ultimate test: devoting a year to train as a competitive cross-country skier. Consulting with personal trainers, coaches, and doctors at the US Olympic Center, he followed the rigorous training regimen of a world-class athlete.

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The Needle Drop
1:38 pm
Wed February 23, 2011

An Experimental Buffet

This week on the Needle Drop, we sample some of the most experimental records of this month from Mogwai, Nicolas Jaar, and Colin Stetson.

We also check in on some Vivian Girls sideprojects and scope a new track from Beach Fossils, too.

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The Faith Middleton Show
12:18 pm
Wed February 23, 2011

Food Schmooze: Frank Stitt Cooks Italian

Frank Stitt is a star in Alabama for his take in his restaurant, on combining Italy and the south. The James Beard Awards named him the best chef of the southeast.

His cookbook, Frank Stitt's Bottega Favorita is filled with recipes for adventurous cooks with time on their hands, many beautiful recipes in all categories.

We talk about some of his most doable recipes in the book, from drinks to appetizers, salads, dressings, entrees and more

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The Faith Middleton Show
12:14 pm
Wed February 23, 2011

Food Schmooze: a Celebration of the Deli

As a journalist and life-long deli obsessive, David Sax was understandably alarmed by the state of Jewish delicatessen. A cuisine that had once thrived as the very center of Jewish life had become endangered by assimilation, homogenization, and health food trends. He watched in dismay as one beloved deli after another—one institution after another—shuttered, only to be reopened as some bland chain-restaurant laying claim to the very culture it just paved over.

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The Faith Middleton Show
1:31 am
Tue February 22, 2011

Little Princes

Sukanto Debnath/flickr creative commons

In search of adventure, twenty-nine-year-old Conor Grennan traded his day job for a year-long trip around the globe, a journey that began with a three-month stint volunteering at the Little Princes Children’s Home, an orphanage in war-torn Nepal.

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Paper Trails
9:55 am
Sun February 20, 2011

Horsemen of the Esophagus

Today on Paper Trails, the new public radio show about books, author Jason Fagone discusses his book Horsemen of the Esophagus: Competitive Eating and the Big Fat American Dream, about the very, very weird world of competitive eating.

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The Faith Middleton Show
12:47 pm
Sat February 19, 2011

Ann Beattie: The New Yorker Stories

The Faith Middleton Show
12:36 pm
Sat February 19, 2011

J.D. Salinger

creative commons, Adie_92

Will Hochman, who teaches at Southern Connecticut State University, is one of these walking encyclopedias of all things J.D. Salinger.

Mr. Salinger, of course, wrote the iconic Catcher in the Rye, and other books, then stopped communicating with the outside world in 1965.  As with any famous recluse, absence creates a sensation of interest and for him the long cat and mouse game began.

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The Faith Middleton Show
7:57 am
Sat February 19, 2011

Hot Seat!

creative commons codepo8

Today's guest is Jackie Farrelly.  She's the Property Manager at Long Wharf Theatre, where she's been responsible for set dressing and props for over one hundred productions during her tenure. Jackie, a Connecticut native, lives in North Haven.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:55 pm
Fri February 18, 2011

The Nose: Sidewalk Rage And A Surprising Case Of #BieberFever

Flickr Creative Commons, Chascow

Earlier this week, Bernie Madoff gave an interview to a reporter working on a book called "Wizard of Lies, Bernie Madoff and the Death of Trust." Wow. Prison must be really boring if he's willing to give that writer his time.

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