Arts/Culture

Code Switch
1:23 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

The Desire For A Reckoning Meets The Wish For A Reset

Since 1989, Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich., has introduced into each session of Congress a bill called HR 40, Commission to Study Reparation Proposals for African Americans Act.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 11:45 am

The title of Ta-Nehisi Coates' much-discussed cover story at The Atlantic, "The Case for Reparations," might be something of a misnomer.

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Ham Radio
5:04 pm
Mon May 26, 2014

Celebrating 100 Years Of Ham Radio

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 10:34 am

This month marks the centennial of the American Radio Relay League, the largest ham radio association in the United States. That means it will be a special year for the hundreds who converge annually on W1AW, a small station known as "the mecca of ham radio" in Newington, Conn., to broadcast radio signals across the globe.

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Interviews
2:03 pm
Mon May 26, 2014

During World War II, Even Filmmakers Reported For Duty

Maj. Frank Capra sits at his War Department desk in Washington on March 6, 1942. Capra's non-War Department films include It's A Wonderful Life and Mr. Smith Goes To Washington.
AP

This interview was originally broadcast on March 3, 2014.

When America entered World War II, some of Hollywood's most celebrated directors enlisted and risked their lives. But they weren't fighting — they were filming combat.

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:05 am
Mon May 26, 2014

Why Diets Fail

Credit Thomas Hawk/flickr creative commons

Many have blamed sugar for dieting failures, but this new book, Why Diets Fail, is the first one backed by current research from the food addiction lab at Princeton University, and it zeroes in on how dieters can get through the make-or-break withdrawal period.

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Sister Cities
7:53 am
Mon May 26, 2014

Stratfords of the World Unite In Connecticut This Summer

Alan Yu and Heather Brandon for WNPR Creative Commons

People from the six places called Stratford are coming to Connecticut this summer.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
6:00 am
Mon May 26, 2014

The "World's Strongest Librarian" On Tourette Syndrome, Weightlifting, and Mormonism

Josh Hanagarne is the author of The World's Strongest Librarian.
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

The story of Josh Hanagarne isn't necessarily funny. He was born with Tourette Syndrome, a poorly understood neuropsychiatric disorder which inflicts on Josh a blizzard of tics, flinches, whoops and yelps.  Most disconcertingly, he frequently hits himself in the face.

Josh's first refuge was books, and that led to a career as a librarian. His second refuge was playing the guitar, which somehow distracted his mind from the triggers producing the tics. And his third refuge was exercise, specifically strength and weight training. 

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Code Switch
2:12 pm
Sat May 24, 2014

Why Chipotle Is Accused Of Contributing To A Culture Of Invisibility

The fast-casual chain announced it will be featuring original stories from famous writers in its restaurants. Missing from the equation? Mexican-American writers.
Gene J. Puskar AP

Originally published on Sat May 24, 2014 5:22 am

You can find all the Mexican-ish food that your stomach desires at Chipotle. What you won't be able to find — on its cups, at least — is the work of Mexican-American writers.

Let me explain: Chipotle — the fast-casual chain that goes by "Chipotle Mexican Grill" — plans to roll out a series called "Cultivating Thought," in which the chain prints original stories by famous writers on its paper goods.

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Spotlight on the Arts
4:20 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

One Marriage, Two Journeys, In Long Wharf's "The Last Five Years"

Adam Halpin as Jamie and Katie Rose Clarke as Cathy in The Last Five Years at Long Wharf Theatre.
T. Charles Erickson

There’s both irony and brilliance behind the story-telling style of "The Last Five Years," Jason Robert Brown’s two-character musical currently running at the Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:21 am
Fri May 23, 2014

The Nose is Wary of Marrying Harry

Jim Chapdelaine is a musician, producer, composer, and recording engineer.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Can the culture of one nation ever understand that of another? Critics say Fox's newest reality show in which 12 witless contestants believe their in a fight to the near death for the attention of England's Prince Harry. "I Wanna Marry Harry" is said to represent a new low in reality television.

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History
11:02 am
Fri May 23, 2014

A Revolution On Two Wheels: Columbia Bicycles

Bicycle made by the Pope Manufacturing Company, about 1881. Pope produced its first bicycles like this Columbia high wheeler in the late 1870s.
Gift of Aetna Connecticut Historical Society, 1994.204.3

The return of spring weather has prompted a marked increase in bicycle traffic all over Connecticut. Country roads, city streets, and scenic rail trails are filled with cyclists of all ages. But how many know that Connecticut played a prominent role in developing not just bicycles, but the market for them?

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Fri May 23, 2014

A Conversation with Dan Brown; the Charles W. Morgan Sets Sail; the History of Ham Radio

J Holt
Chion Wolf WNPR

Author Dan Brown has written some of the biggest blockbuster books, from The Da Vinci Code to his latest book, Inferno. He’s coming to Hartford next month to talk with John Dankosky at the Bushnell. This hour, he joins us for a preview of that conversation.

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Photography And Memory
5:18 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Overexposed? Camera Phones Could Be Washing Out Our Memories

Rebecca Woolf takes a lot of photos of her children for her blog, Girl's Gone Child, but says she tries to not let the camera get in the middle of a moment.
Courtesy of Rebecca Woolf

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 12:58 pm

Los Angeles blogger Rebecca Woolf uses her blog, Girl's Gone Child, as a window into her family's life. Naturally, it includes oodles of pictures of her four children.

She says she's probably taken tens of thousands of photos since her oldest child was born. And she remembers the moment when it suddenly clicked — if you will — that she was too absorbed in digital documentation.

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The Faith Middleton Show
2:11 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Exploring the Difference Between Curing and Healing

Credit Neil Fowler/flickr creative commons

The pediatric oncologist Mark Greenberg says in his riveting TED talk, that medicine is losing its vision of healing. “We are not health care providers,” he notes pointedly. “We traffic in healing.” Greenberg knows what he's talking about, and not only because of his long history treating severely ill children. He lost his own child to cancer.

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Movies
3:06 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

'Batman V Superman': A Legal Thriller (We Hope)

Henry Cavill played Superman in Man Of Steel and will return to go to court with Batman (we hope) next year.
Clay Enos Warner Bros. Pictures

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 2:52 pm

We learned today that the upcoming sequel to Man Of Steel will be called Batman v Superman: Dawn Of Justice.

This is interesting for several reasons. First of all, "Dawn Of Justice" sounds like a dirty movie about sheriffs. Second of all, "Dawn Of Justice" sounds like it precedes the Morning Of Reckoning, the Afternoon Of Relief, the Dusk Of Regret, the Evening Of Resignation, and the Hot Muggy Midnight Of History Repeating Itself, all leading up to Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice: The Next Day.

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Jazz Corridor
12:04 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Israeli Trio Fuses Modern Jazz With Middle Eastern Sounds In Connecticut Debut

Trio Shalva. From left, Assaf Gleizner, Nadav Snir-Zelniker, and Koby Hayon.
Peter Salo

While playing his weekly gig at Manhattan’s Caffe Vivaldi some four years ago, pianist Assaf Gleizner, a Tel Aviv native, decided to please his parents by mixing traditional Israeli folk music with the modern jazz fare that he and his fellow Israeli sidemen, Koby Hayon and Nadav Snir-Zelniker, were to serve that night at the popular West Village restaurant and live music hot spot.   

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:00 am
Wed May 21, 2014

New England Diner Breakfast Specials

Credit J.Knecht/flickr creative commons

The grill is out, so joy is here. Try our recommended chicken burger studded with chives. Or surprise your friends with a new kind of salad—grilled romaine slathered in olive oil to produce a char. 

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:16 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Technology: What's Here, What's Coming Soon

Credit Randy Pertiet/flickr creative commons

We tell you what's happening in the tech world, whether you love this stuff or can't figure out how to be “in the know.” (If I could write code I'd be rich.)

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Television
3:19 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Louis C.K. On His 'Louie' Hiatus: 'I Wanted The Show To Feel New Again'

In Louie, Louis C.K. plays a comic who finds comedy in uncomfortable, touchy topics.
K.C. Bailey FX

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 2:59 pm

Louis C.K. is now commonly acknowledged as one of the greatest comics of his generation. His celebrated FX series, Louie, started its fourth season a couple weeks ago, after a 19-month hiatus.

Louis C.K. created, writes, directs and stars in the series as a standup comic named Louie, who, like Louis C.K., is the divorced father of two young girls and shares custody with their mother. Last year, Louis C.K. also had prominent roles in two films: Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine and David O. Russell's American Hustle.

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The Faith Middleton Show
12:29 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

How Personality Shapes Our Lives

Credit Willi Heidelbach/flickr creative commons

Respected researcher and psychologist John Mayer says we can become the best version of ourselves by building our “personal intelligence” to understand ourselves and perceive what makes others tick.

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Arts/Culture
11:53 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Getting the Morgan into Shipshape

Brad Clift / WNPR

In the days leading up to it's departure from its berth of 70 years at Mystic Seaport, the crew and craftspeople who have dedicated their hands and hearts to the restoration of the Charles W. Morgan prepare to send her to sea. 

Arts/Culture
11:53 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Getting the Morgan into Shipshape

Brad Clift / WNPR

In the days leading up to it's departure from its berth of 70 years at Mystic Seaport, the crew and craftspeople who have dedicated their hands and hearts to the restoration of the Charles W. Morgan prepare to send her to sea. 

History
4:22 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Curtis Veeder Builds His Dream House

The Connecticut Historical Society, One Elizabeth Street, Hartford. The CHS is now located in this stone house built between 1925-1928 by Curtis Veeder.
Connecticut Historical Society

If you visit the Connecticut Historical Society, at One Elizabeth Street in Hartford, you will discover an unusual and intriguing building that was originally built as the home of industrialist Curtis Veeder. Veeder began to plan this house in 1925, and moved in with his wife and two daughters in 1928.  He lived here until his death in 1943. Mrs.Veeder lived in the house until 1950 when she sold it to the Historical Society. It has been adapted for other uses, but it still reflects Curtis Veeder’s personality, talents, and interests.  

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Television
2:05 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

This Fall, TV Looks Much More Diverse: Now Don't Screw It Up

ABC's How To Get Away With Murder stars Oscar nominee Viola Davis.
Craig Sjodin ABC

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 1:13 pm

For those of us who have spent time arguing for increased ethnic and cultural diversity on television, the last seven days have felt like a fantasy fever dream.

This week, the big broadcast networks announced their schedules for the 2014-15 TV season during the industry's "upfront" presentations to advertisers. And there are 10 new series featuring non-white characters and/or show creators – numbers we haven't seen since the days when everybody was trying to clone The Cosby Show.

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Technology
3:41 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Are Filmmakers Using Drones Illegally? Looks Like It

Jeff Blank, of Los Angeles-based Drone Dudes, prepares a quadcopter for takeoff. The drone has to chase a motorcycle down a hill.
Aarti Shahani NPR

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 12:11 pm

It is illegal in the U.S. to operate a drone for cash. That's the position of the Federal Aviation Administration — which is in charge of protecting air space. But at least one industry has decided that it doesn't care and it's going to put drones to work anyway: the film industry.

Drone Startups Hit Hollywood

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Verse and Voice
3:14 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

From the Heart to the Plate

Stephanie Nobert New Britain Industrial Museum

All thanks to Landers, Fray and Clark,
the turn of the century had launched
many irons, coffee percolators, samovars,
Another in that list is their variety of toasters.

The smallest of the house would sit
and watch so the bread won't burn to a crisp.
It was done with the assistance of a lever
if the bread was too hot for them to handle.

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The Faith Middleton Show
2:11 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

The Book Show: May 15, 2014

Credit walknboston/flickr creative commons

Today's show originally aired March 20, 2014.

Faith's motto on The Book Show is… Life is short, but it can be ever so wide.

Join Faith and her book buddies for a call-in show recommending terrific books to read in all categories. If you're in a book club, please tell us what you've read and enjoyed.

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Jazz Corridor
2:48 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

Jazz Goes to Church In Its Sunday Best

The interior of the Asylum Hill Congregational Church in Hartford.
Asylum Hill Congregational Church

Long a welcoming haven for jazz, Asylum Hill Congregational Church embraces Duke Ellington’s sacred music Sunday, May 18, at 4:00 pm as it presents "The Best of the Duke Ellington Sacred Concerts" with full-scale, soulful re-creations blessed with four mighty choirs singing, a powerhouse jazz band swinging, and a tap dancer tapping in the historic Hartford church’s majestic sanctuary.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:37 am
Wed May 14, 2014

If You Give a Kid a Book They Want, They'll Read It

Victoria Ford Smith is an assistant professor of English at the University of Connecticut
Chion Wolf

The first children's room in a public library may have been in Hartford, Connecticut. The head librarian here, Caroline Hewins was an early advocate for taking seriously the reading needs of children starting in the late 19th century. Prior to that children's lit wasn't really treated as a genre that could stand on its own two feet.  

Today, of course, it's massive and diverse. Its themes range from light to darkness, its language may be mannered or naturalistic, its art may be glorious or crude.  And, there really seems to be a readership for all those possibilities. But, some would say we need more diversity.

Today on the show, we talk about children's books, first from the perspective of two authors and then with a scholar and a librarian.

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:05 am
Wed May 14, 2014

You Can Be the King of Cocktails at Your House

Credit Kirti Poddar/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: If you think only “mixologists” can create good cocktails, think again, my friend. I have always believed that any of us can make a deeply satisfying drink, with or without alcohol. In fact, I'm living proof that it can be done.

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Spotlight on the Arts
4:18 pm
Tue May 13, 2014

Goodspeed's Fan Friendly "Damn Yankees"

Lora Lee Gayer and cast perform "Shoeless Joe from Hannibal, MO" from "Damn Yankees."
Diane Sobolewski

You could make the case that America’s obsession with sports really took hold thanks to baseball in the 1950s. When Broadway producer/director/writer George Abbott turned to "Damn Yankees" as his next musical in 1955, the timing couldn’t have been more perfect.

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