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John McPhee is a writer's writer. He's thought of as one of the progenitors of the New Journalism, of creative nonfiction or narrative nonfiction, along with people like Gay Talese and Tom Wolfe and Hunter S. Thompson. But his style is... quiter than those folks'. His writing is transparent. He tends to keep himself out of the narrative. He doesn't even, in fact, have an author photo.

Hugh Hefner created Playboy at his kitchen table in Chicago. The magazine was blamed for (or credited with) setting off a cultural revolution in America, but within a few years Hefner was branded a male chauvinist. He was a proponent of free speech and a champion of civil rights who was decried as a merchant of smut.

Hefner died Wednesday at the age of 91, the magazine announced in a statement, writing that he "peacefully passed away today from natural causes at his home, The Playboy Mansion, surrounded by loved ones."

Frank C. Muller / Flickr

In the 1800s, Connecticut peddlers would travel south to peddle goods made in small factories around the state. The best way to increase their profit margin was to slip a few pieces of prized nutmeg -- and a few fake wooden ones to match -- in their bag. It didn't take long to expose the fraud, earning us the nickname of the Nutmeg State, known by all as clever, if ethically challenged, people. 

Jon Olson

Six years ago she became the first female to lead the Hartford Symphony Orchestra. This hour, Carolyn Kuan talks about her intricate journey to the Connecticut stage.

It's the latest in WNPR's "Making Her Story" series, recorded live at the Warner Theatre in Torrington, Connecticut. 

Angela George / Creative Commons

Sam Waterston says he's been been lucky to have good fortune in his career and personal life. He's been nominated multiple times for Emmy, Academy, and Tony Awards and he won Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Awards for performances playing men whose moral compass points north.  

Maisa Tisdale

Within the shadow of P.T. Barnum lies a much quieter tale of Bridgeport prosperity -- a tale involving two nineteenth-century sisters, Mary and Eliza Freeman.

While neither achieved the same level of recognition as Barnum, both established a significant place within the history of Connecticut’s Park City. 

Jhontas Jesus Silva / Flikr

Of the many strange behaviors we humans have engaged in, few seem more abhorrent than cannibalism. But the act of feasting on another human's flesh cannot be so easily dismissed as simply disgusting or deviant. Freud, in fact, believed cannibalism played a role in the birth of religion itself.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

After 41 years, Trinity College music professor Gerald Moshell will retire at the end of the spring semester. He conducts his final concert at Trinity on Friday night.

Curt Richter, Chion Wolf / WNPR

Colin McEnroe is taking a couple weeks off, so today Chion Wolf introduces you to three Connecticut residents who have careers in very different fields of expertise.

Since it opened in June, the new Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum has attracted thousands of visitors to Springfield. It features murals and statues of some of the author's most famous characters, like Horton the Elephant and the Cat in the Hat.

Copper Beech Institute

Recently, I hopped into my car to go home after a long and grinding first day back to work. I had just returned the day before from a two-week vacation exploring the treasures of two foreign countries I had never seen before. 

The abrupt transition from play to work left me feeling quite blue, made worse by my receding memories of those weeks. Something in me needed music.  So, I traded out my usual afternoon newscast for a "soul" song that caught my ear and brightened my heart. 

Columbia Pictures

"Close Encounters of the Third Kind" was originally released on December 14, 1977. It was nominated for seven Academy Awards and has gone on to gross more than $300 million worldwide. 

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The Connecticut Authors Trail wraps up its ninth season Thursday with a reading by Connecticut author Beatriz Williams at the Mohegan Sun Cabaret Theater.

Stephanie "TabbieWolf" Krus

Like just about anything else one delves into, the subculture known as furries is more nuanced, more varied and less sensational than mass media depictions of them.

Melania Trump is in many ways a first: The first First Lady to have arrived as an immigrant, the first to have been born in a communist country, and the first to be the 3rd wife of a president. She is not the first, however, to show signs of reluctance towards embracing the role of FLOTUS.

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