Arts/Culture

Game Theory
5:01 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

'Jeopardy Villain' Explains How He Keeps Winning

Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek and contestant Arthur Chu pose for a photo. (Facebook)

He’s being called the “Jeopardy villain,” but Arthur Chu of Broadview Heights, Ohio, considers himself more of a “mad genius.” The 30-year-old insurance analyst and voiceover artist has won three times since he came on the show last week.

Some say Chu is taking all the fun out of the game. He goes for the hardest questions first, slams down his buzzer incessantly and tries to get the host to speed up. It’s all part of his strategy inspired by game theory — a model of strategic, mathematical decision making.

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The Faith Middleton Show
1:33 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

Protecting and Growing Your Money

Credit _J_D_R_/flickr creative commons

Our financial analysts look at protecting and growing your money.

On this fresh edition of The Faith Middleton Show, the markets have been dropping despite some good economic news. Are investors truly spooked or taking profits? What's going on? Are we in for one of those rocky years in the market, and if so, our guests take your calls and talk about protecting and growing your money.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
1:13 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

An Ode to Opera

Willie Waters is the former director of Connecticut Opera.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Last fall, the New York City Opera -- what Mayor LaGuardia called "the People's Opera" -- declared bankruptcy. This is/was the opera that introduced Americans to Placido Domingo and Beverly Sills.  Make what you will of the fact that the bankruptcy announcement coincided with the presentation of a new opera about Anna Nicole Smith.

This is either a problem very specific to the New York Opera, or part of a virus that has been taking down opera companies all over the U.S. and maybe all over the world. In Italy, where opera receives much more public and government support, one fourth of all major opera companies were in a version of bankruptcy as of 2008.

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Television
12:48 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

'Borgen' Is Denmark's 'West Wing' (But Even Better)

Borgen's heroine is Birgitte Nyborg, superbly played by Sidse Babett Knudsen. Pilou Asbaek plays Don Draper-ish spin doctor Kasper Juul.
MHz Networks

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 11:10 am

The Danish television series Borgen about a female party leader who unexpectedly becomes Denmark's prime minister was a hit in its home country and in the U.K. It won numerous international prizes, and a cult following in the U.S. after its sporadic TV broadcasts — Stephen King named it his favorite piece of pop culture of 2012. The third and final season has just been released on DVD by MHz Networks, which also brought out seasons one and two.

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Arts/Culture
11:50 am
Tue February 4, 2014

Faith's Top New York City Picks

Credit Loz Pycock/flickr creative commons

Richard Serra steel sculpture show, Gagosian Gallery, 21st & 24th Streets, Chelsea.

Try to score a ticket for Twelfth Night, one of the best Shakespeare performances you will ever see, straight from London.

Spotlight on the Arts
1:04 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

Unexpected Musical Delights On Display in Ridgefield

Fans of Merle Haggard, photographed by James Mollison at the Von Braun Center Concert Hall in Huntsville, Alabama.
Credit James Mollison / The Aldrich

Music can involve us beyond the act of mere listening. At the current exhibition at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, you will need all five senses. Be prepared to get physical. With an eye and ear toward expanding our understanding of music and art, The Aldrich has brought together the work of five gifted contemporary artists in a series called Music, through March 9.

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:19 am
Mon February 3, 2014

Your Memories of Winter Snowstorms

Credit Barbara/flickr creative commons

Down it comes, and when those crystals hit, the covering is beautiful, quiet, and sometimes threatening.

Tell us a snow story, whether it's one of delight or one of fear of destruction. Do you have snow traditions—sugar on snow, a sleigh ride, igloo building, snow shoeing?

Here's Daniel Tammet on the science of snowflakes.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:19 am
Mon February 3, 2014

The Scramble: The Famous Are Human Too

Philip Seymour Hoffman
Credit Justin Hoch and the Hudson Union Society / Creative Commons

On Sunday, two people named Dylan made news. So much so that you had to be careful on Twitter. If you tweeted "Dylan sold out" about Bob Dylan's Super Bowl commercials, you might offend people who thought you meant Dylan Farrow who broke 20 years of silence to talk about her memory of childhood molestation by Woody Allen. 

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Loss of an Actor
7:06 pm
Sun February 2, 2014

Philip Seymour Hoffman: An 'Uncanny' Actor Of Stage And Screen

Hoffman (left) and Eddie Marsan, in a scene from the film God's Pocket, released in January.
Lance Acord AP

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 2:53 pm

Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman was found dead on Sunday in his Manhattan apartment. He was 46.

Hoffman was steeped in his profession — in film, on stage, in the spotlight and behind the scenes.

In 2005, he won the Oscar for best actor for his portrayal of Truman Capote. The movie focuses on Capote's interviews with two murderers on death row for his nonfiction novel In Cold Blood.

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History
3:36 pm
Fri January 31, 2014

Connecticut Yankee and Millstone: 46 Years of Nuclear Power

Artist’s rendering of the Connecticut Yankee Power Company Plant, Haddam Neck. Postcard published by the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, ca. 1968.
Connecticut Historical Society, 2000.24.1

Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, Connecticut’s first nuclear power plant, began commercial operation, in Haddam Neck, on January 1, 1968. It was a time of high expectations for the economic potential of peaceful nuclear energy. An enthusiastic 1962 article in the Hartford Courant, titled “Atoms Now Power Homes,” predicted that nuclear power would soon compete with coal and oil. New England’s first station, Yankee Rowe, had begun operation in Massachusetts in 1961.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:26 am
Fri January 31, 2014

The Nose Does the Guilt Pose, Spoils Superbowl Commercials, and Survives Anxiety

Rand Cooper.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Today on the Nose, we'll discuss one of those eruptions that happen in the digital world -- a frenzy of discussion and expressions of outrage over an essay on the site xojane, by a writer who tried to describe her reactions, as a skinny white woman, to the way she thought a heavyset back woman was reacting to her in yoga class.

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Power of Music
11:23 am
Fri January 31, 2014

When We First Met "Baby"

Nancy Matlack Elligers on cello with Goodnight Blue Moon.
Chion Wolf WNPR

"This song is about unrequited love - loving someone that just won't be able to give it back to you," said Goodnight Blue Moon's Erik Elligers. He's talking about a song off his band's new EP A Girl I Never Met called "Baby" and it's a song that has special meaning for us at WNPR.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Fri January 31, 2014

New Releases From Goodnight Blue Moon and Daphne Lee Martin

Goodnight Blue Moon performed songs from their new EP, <em>A Girl I Never Met</em>
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, we check back in with two musical acts that we’ve featured on the program before. Goodnight Blue Moon’s Elm City roots are evident in their music. Their new EP is called, A Girl I Never Met and it features a song that’s based on a poem found in a Fair Haven history book. Goodnight Blue Moon join us in-studio to talk about the new release and to play some music.

We're also be joined by another Connecticut musician: Daphne Lee Martin. Her upcoming album Frost is a follow-up to last year’s Moxie, which we featured on the show last year. Daphne joins us to talk about Frost and to catch up on her success since she last joined us.

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Performance
6:48 am
Fri January 31, 2014

Opera Composed at a WWII Concentration Camp is Performed in New London

A scene from "Der Kaiser von Atlantis."
John Waller

An opera written by a Jewish composer while in a Nazi concentration camp during World War II will be performed this weekend in Connecticut. In an egregious bit of Nazi Propaganda, the concentration camp known as Theresienstadt was falsely presented to the world as a model Jewish settlement.

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Music
2:31 pm
Thu January 30, 2014

'Spirit Of Family' Unites Ladysmith Black Mambazo

Darren Phillip Jones

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 11:58 am

For fans of world music, South Africa's Ladysmith Black Mambazo needs no introduction.

The group has been singing a capella together for 50 years, brought together by Joseph Shabalala, a young farmhand turned factory worker from the town of Ladysmith. He had a dream of tight vocal harmonies and messages of peace.

That dream developed, and the band came to the attention of Paul Simon, who had it record "Homeless" on his album Graceland. It introduced the group to the world.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:57 am
Thu January 30, 2014

Adjuncts in Academia

Credit Brett Jordan / Creative Commons

Imagine a day without adjunct faculty. Many colleges and universities would effectively shut down.  Somewhere between 70-75% of the academic workforce in higher education is not tenured or on track for tenure. Most of those people fall into the category of adjunct. 

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Music
11:56 am
Thu January 30, 2014

Ladysmith Black Mambazo to Perform in Connecticut This Weekend

Ladysmith Black Mambazo. The group will perform at UConn on February 1 at 8:00 pm.
Credit Lulis Leal

The South African a capella vocal group Ladysmith Black Mambazo will be in Connecticut this weekend. The group began performing over 50 years ago during the period of apartheid, and became a worldwide sensation after performing on Paul Simon’s landmark Graceland album in the 1980s. 

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:25 am
Thu January 30, 2014

Mastering the Art of Quitting in Life, Love, and Work

Credit Kate Haskell/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: As we can see from a recent Planet Money story on NPR, millions of people are quitting their jobs each month, and Janet Yellen of The Fed thinks this is a good sign. She says if people are quitting in high numbers, that signals they're sure better jobs are available. In other words, a strong signal for the economy.

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Folk Aboard
3:32 pm
Wed January 29, 2014

My Road Trip With Pete Seeger

"This machine surrounds hate and forces it to surrender."
Credit Joseph Holmes / Creative Commons

It was the 1980s and I was a busy musician in New York City. Mine was an eclectic musical life as both a violinist and singer. One day I was seated in a chamber orchestra playing classical violin, the next I was gigging on my electric fiddle and singing back-up in a folk/Latin band.

One day, Mike, the leader of a folk band I played with, called to say that he and I were going to drive Pete Seeger to a music festival in Washington, D.C.

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The Food Schmooze
10:05 am
Wed January 29, 2014

Faith's Favorite Chicken Cacciatore Recipe for Your Super Bowl Crowd

Credit alanagkelly/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: This is insanely delicious, I thought, taking my third bite of Giada's chicken cacciatore. There are a few steps involved, but not too many, and they are worth the time it takes because each step layers flavor.

Without a doubt, this is the richest and best cacciatore I have ever had, and it's easily tweaked if you're not a caper fan, or you need skinless, boneless chicken. The recipe can be doubled, tripled, depending on the size of your party, and will benefit from being made ahead, allowing the flavors to become even more powerful. (And allowing you to enjoy the game.)

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Jazz Corridor
5:45 am
Wed January 29, 2014

International Jazz Treats Around the State This Weekend

Ignacio Berroa
Credit Ignacio Berroa

While jazz is the great American art form, it has long been graced by the welcome presence of many gifted practitioners from around the world, a sign of its universal appeal and global evolution into the hippest kind of Esperanto: a universal musical language understood by all.

Pleasant reminders of the music’s international scope pop up this weekend as three eminent émigré artists, drummer Ignacio Berroa, and pianists Laszlo Gardony and Amina Figarova -- who, respectively, are originally from Cuba, Hungary and Azerbaijan -- perform individually in Connecticut venues from Old Lyme to Middletown.

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Europe
2:57 am
Wed January 29, 2014

Archaeologists Unearth What May Be Oldest Roman Temple

Excavation at the Sant'Omobono site in central Rome has provided evidence of early Romans' efforts to transform the landscape of their city.
Sylvia Poggioli NPR

Originally published on Wed January 29, 2014 12:49 pm

Archaeologists excavating a site in central Rome say they've uncovered what may be oldest known temple from Roman antiquity.

Along the way, they've also discovered how much the early Romans intervened to shape their urban environment.

And the dig has been particularly challenging because the temple lies below the water table.

At the foot Capitoline Hill in the center of Rome, stands the Medieval Sant'Omobono church.

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:59 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Miss Manners Takes On Workplace Etiquette

Credit herval/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: The "doyenne of civility," Judith Martin, a.k.a. Miss Manners, has decided that the fast-changing modern workplace could use some tips on what is and is not okay. And she delivers it in her characteristic dry, witty way, in the book she has co-authored with her son, Nicholas Ivor Martin—Miss Manners Minds Your Business.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:42 am
Tue January 28, 2014

The Conjuring Arts

"Cyril the Sorcerer" is also known as CJ May, a New Haven-based magician who uses magic to teacabout sustainability to both children and adults.
Chion Wolf

Led by Harry Potter, the last 20 years have unleashed a new wave of enthusiasm for the fantasy side  of magic. But, we've also seen an undeniable re-engagement with stage magic. In 2006 alone, there were two movies about magicians, "The  Prestige" and "The Illusionist." 

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Legend of Folk
7:35 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Pete Seeger, Folk Music Icon And Activist, Dies At 94

Pete Seeger closes out the 2011 Newport Folk Festival.
Anna Webber WireImage

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 11:00 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': A look back at Pete Seeger's life, from former NPR newscaster Paul Brown

Pete Seeger, "a tireless campaigner for his own vision of a utopia marked by peace and togetherness," died Monday at the age of 94.

As former NPR broadcaster Paul Brown adds in an appreciation he prepared for Morning Edition, Seeger's tools "were his songs, his voice, his enthusiasm and his musical instruments."

The songs he'll be long remembered for include "If I Had a Hammer," "Turn, Turn, Turn" and "Where Have All the Flowers Gone."

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:29 am
Mon January 27, 2014

The Scramble Shares Limited Information About Today's Show: FOI and Football

In 2012, professional football players suffered 1,496 severe injuries.
Credit Ron Cogswell / Creative Commons

It's Monday. That means our show is The Scramble, where we make a lot of decisions on a last minute basis. We asked our super guest, Marc Tracy of The New Republic, to pick three topics about which Colin would quickly get up to speed. 

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The Faith Middleton Show
10:14 am
Mon January 27, 2014

The Best Pet Care Tips

Credit Asaf antman/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: Barking, fleas, Lyme disease, pet food, biting, housebreaking, shyness, pet insurance, animal rescue. Top flight advice from vet Dr. Todd Friedland. Don't miss his adventures with animals of all kinds.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Mon January 27, 2014

As Relevant as Ever: the Music of Duke Ellington

The musical influence of Duke Ellington survives long past his death.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

Duke Ellington is one of the pivotal figures in jazz. He was a pianist, composer and bandleader whose impact lasted well beyond his death. Terry Teachout joins us in studio to talk about his new book, Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington. We’ll also talk to local musicians about Ellington’s musical influence on their work.

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Native History
3:32 am
Mon January 27, 2014

Legacy Of Forced March Still Haunts Navajo Nation

A portion of Navajo artist Shonto Begay's mural depicting the Long Walk.
The Bosque Redondo Memorial/Shonto Begay

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 11:54 am

Musician Clarence Clearwater, like so many Navajos, has moved off the reservation for work. He performs on the Grand Canyon Railway, the lone Indian among dozens of cowboys and train robbers entertaining tourists.

"I always tell people I'm there to temper the cowboys," says Clearwater. "I'm there to give people the knowledge that there was more of the West than just cowboys."

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The Grammys
12:33 am
Mon January 27, 2014

Daft Punk, Lorde And Macklemore Win Major Grammy Awards

Daft Punk won the Grammy for Album of the Year for Random Access Memories and for Record of the Year for "Get Lucky."
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 12:29 pm

French dance music producers Daft Punk won Album of the Year for Random Access Memories and Record of the Year for their hit "Get Lucky" at the 56th annual Grammy awards on Sunday night. In a ceremony heavy on collaborative performances (Robin Thicke with Chicago, Kendrick Lamar with Imagine Dragons and Metallica with Lang Lang were a few of the more random pairings) and light on surprise, no single artist dominated.

Read The Complete List Of Winners

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