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Arts and Culture

Leo Leung / Creative Commons

Ever since the Presidential election we’ve heard the buzzwords — “echo-chamber,” “facts,” “alternative facts.” More than ever our country is divided by how we get our information and what we see as the “truth.” Even reality itself has become debatable.

Open Grid Scheduler / Grid Engine / flickr creative commons

As the Department of Homeland Security collects plans for the US-Mexico border, the conversation is turning more towards how border walls don't work in keeping people out.

This hour, we talk about what walls are effective in dividing: our psyches, our environments, and the populations around them.

Eastern Connecticut Ballet

Five-foot, ten-inch dancer Gloria Govrin reached unprecedented heights when she joined the New York City Ballet nearly six decades ago. This hour, we take an in-depth look at her groundbreaking career -- including her work under choreographer George Balanchine ("Mr. B") -- and learn about the unique opportunity that brought her to Connecticut. 

Lori Mack/WNPR

The Big Read is returning to New Haven. The International Festival of Arts and Ideas, in partnership with the New Haven Free Public Library, announced the citywide literary program at City Hall. 

Toto / flickr creative commons

It was kind of an odd week this week (as they all are). Kendall Jenner tried to save the world with a Pepsi. And then Barry Manilow came out at age 73. And then Don Rickles died at age 90.

Olga Zakrevska / dahkabrahka.com

The Ukrainian world music quartet DakhaBrakha combines rhythms and instruments from several continents with folk music from their native country. The group is scheduled to stop in Connecticut on Thursday for a performance.

Walter Woodward / University of Connecticut

Herbert Hoover realized early in the 20th century that food was as important as bullets to win a war. After witnessing Belgians starve under the harsh treatment of Germany before World War I, he determined to never let that happen in America. So, when the men marched off to war in both World War I and again in World War II, the women marched out to the fields. 

It was about unity, Pepsi explained. But the company's new ad, set at a protest march, was quickly called out for being tone-deaf, offensive, and perhaps worst of all for the brand: not "woke."

Kevin Dooley / flickr creative commons

It was 50 years ago today that The Beatles were in the studio working on the follow-up to their 1966 album, Revolver, and on June 1, 1967, they released Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Sgt. Pepper's has been called the beginning of the album era. In 2003, Rolling Stone ranked it #1 on their "500 Greatest Albums of All Time." It is the best-selling album of the 1960s.

Documentary About LGBTQ Clergy Comes To Yale

Apr 3, 2017
Brian Talbot / Flickr

A new documentary is being screened at Yale Divinity School. "Out of Order" follows five LGBTQ people who face challenges in the Presbyterian ordination process.

S-Town Podcast/Serial Podcast/This American Life

S-Town is the new, wimpily titled, seven-hour, non-fiction, southern gothic novel of a podcast that the folks behind Serial and This American Life released all at once this Tuesday, and The Nose has listened to the whole thing.

Some of us even listened to it all at once this Tuesday.

niloufarnourbakhsh.com

White House lawyers were in court on Wednesday in Honolulu to argue that President Donald Trump's revised travel ban, issued earlier this month, should be allowed to take effect. But U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson, the same judge who temporarily blocked the travel ban hours after it was issued, decided to extend his first order, which will block the travel ban indefinitely.

Christopher / flickr creative commons

This month, the nation turns its eyes to basketball, to college basketball, to its annual March Madness tournament.

But... not quite all of the nation.

Some of the nation is, well, nerdier than that.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

We couldn’t let March come to a close without recognizing that it’s Women’s History Month.

This hour, we honor the occasion with tributes to the inspiring twentieth-century women -- the so-called "motor girls" and "Kalamazoo gals" -- who helped shape American history and American industry. 

20th Century Fox

James "Logan" Howlett -- Wolverine -- is maybe the only X-Men character to appear in every adaptation of the franchise to date, including now nine feature films. Logan, though, is different from the eight movies that precede it in certain ways. It's R-rated. It contains many utterances of certain four-letter words. It's incredibly, and graphically, violent. It's maybe more of a neo-western set in the future than it's a comic book movie.

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