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Arts and Culture

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: two musicians, two nations, one unifying sound. We sit down with Brazilian jazz artists Joe Carter and Isabella Mendes. We learn about their unique backgrounds and influences, and we listen to the music that brought them together. 

Wikimedia Commons

Seventy-two years ago on January 27, the Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz was liberated by Soviet troops. Now, "citizen historians" in Connecticut are examining how that and other events of the Holocaust were covered in local newspapers.

AP Ancient City Productions Ltd.

The new documentary film "Atlantis Rising" premieres soon on National Geographic. It centers on an underwater search for evidence of the mythical lost city and civilization of Atlantis.

Mary Tyler Moore, who died Wednesday, wasn't just beloved. She was the kind of beloved where they build you a statue. Moore's statue is in Minneapolis, where her best-known character, Mary Richards of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, worked for the fictional television station WJM. She'd already won two Emmys playing Laura Petrie on The Dick Van Dyke Show, but Moore cemented her icon status when Mary Richards walked into that job interview. Even if she got off to a rough start with Lou Grant, her soon-to-be boss, who kept a bottle of whiskey in his desk.

Derek Σωκράτης Finch / flickr creative commons

So, it turns out the world didn't end last week.

And while it might seem like the events of the last year or so are the disease, maybe they're really just the symptoms; maybe they're really just signs of the dystopia around us.

But, then: Which dystopia?

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When the nominees for the 2017 Academy Awards were announced this morning, La La Land racked up 14 nods, tying records held by Titanic and All About Eve.

versageek / Creative Commons

New Haven is currently home to more than 130,000 people. Initially named Newhaven in 1640, New Haven was Connecticut's co-capital city with Hartford until 1875. The city is the birthplace of former President George W. Bush, the hamburger, and public tree planting.

It's not fair to compare the 2004 film Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events to the new Netflix series A Series of Unfortunate Events.

But let's do it anyway.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Over a dozen Connecticut theaters hosted “ghost light” ceremonies on the eve of the presidential inauguration, joining 700 theaters nationwide in a pledge for inclusiveness and diversity in the arts.

President-elect Donald Trump has been clear about issues important to him and his supporters: Build A Wall. Repeal and Replace Obamacare. Make Better Trade Deals. On other issues, large and small, Trump and his surrogates have been more ambiguous: Russia. Climate Change. 

Mike Burns / Flickr Creative Commons

Jerks. Jackasses. A-holes. Some people are just... the worst. Aren't they? But so: Why? And what do we do about it?

Alan Levine / flickr creative commons

"Accessibility" is a word that we maybe too quickly file away as having something to do with the disabled or something like that. But it's really about "designing all products and the built environment to be aesthetic and usable to the greatest extent possible by everyone, regardless of their age, ability, or status in life."

It's about seeing the world around us as for everyone, all at once.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Music can be a powerful, transformative tool in the quest for social change. Protest songs are the songs associated with a particular movement. 

Earlier this month, Janelle Monáe and Wondaland produced the searing protest song "Hell You Talmbout." Nearly seven minutes long, it's a tribute to a long list of black men and women lost, and has been performed alongside protesters at Black Lives Matter rallies.

LIONSGATE

Damien Chazelle's big musical La La Land won a record seven awards at this year's Golden Globes. The New York Times says the movie "makes musicals matter again." Colin, on the other hand, calls it "a really terrific, creative, big budget Prius commercial." The Nose gets into it.

Donald Sosin

During the silent film era, motion pictures were often accompanied by a local organist or a pianist. The player would watch along with the audience and improvise, creating an on the spot movie score for the audience's enjoyment. 

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