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State Budget

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Connecticut Towns Struggle To Adapt To State Budget Proposal

Connecticut’s cities and towns are calculating the potential cost of Governor Dannel Malloy’s budget proposal. The governor included major changes in the way the state disburses municipal aid, as well as shifting part of the cost of teachers’ pensions to towns.

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Green Technology

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Connecticut's First High-Tech Food Waste Recycler Set To Come Online

In 2013, Connecticut's legislature passed a law requiring some businesses to recycle old food, but the rule has a catch: it only applies if a certified recycler is nearby -- and able to take it. The idea was to jumpstart a market for organic recycling in Connecticut. And now, more than three years later, the first of those new recyclers is set to come online.

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Addiction

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

New London Launches Initiative To Make Sober Houses Safer

Cities across the state have struggled to crack down on mismanaged "sober houses" -- residences where people with addiction can pay to live in a drug and alcohol free environment.

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Education

US Department of Education / Creative Commons

Connecticut Educators Weigh Betsy DeVos's Lack of Experience

The selection of billionaire Betsy DeVos to head the U.S. Department of Education has ignited a debate over her lack of experience, and whether it could be good or bad.

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Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Twenty-first century technology has made its way onto a 19th-century building in Hamden. WNPR recently visited the headquarters of the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, which just installed solar panels on its office.

Today the Senate confirmed Betsy DeVos as President Trump's education secretary, 51-50.

Loco Steve / Creative Commons

Opponents of a new rail bypass plan for shoreline Connecticut want to see intervention from state lawmakers. Two bills before the General Assembly would mandate that changes to the state’s rail service could only take place after referendums in affected communities.

In late December last year, the Federal Railroad Administration released the latest iteration of its plan to upgrade the Northeast Corridor, including rerouting the line in several places. The aim is to be able to accommodate much higher speed trains.

Everyone expects Congress to change the Affordable Care Act, but no one knows exactly how.

The uncertainty has one group of people, the homeless, especially concerned. Many received health coverage for the first time under Obamacare; now they're worried it will disappear.

Joseph Funn, homeless for almost 20 years, says his body took a beating while he lived on the street.

Now, he sees nurse practitioner Amber Richert fairly regularly at the Health Care for the Homeless clinic in Baltimore.

Senate Democrats held an all-night session Monday night into Tuesday morning in a last-ditch effort to try to stop President Trump's nominee for secretary of education, Betsy DeVos, from being confirmed.

Among those who took to the floor was Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, who said it was "difficult to imagine a worse choice to head the Department of Education."

Mark Goebel / Creative Commons

The University of Hartford is investigating an email sent to some campus accounts referencing white supremacy Saturday night, and its president is denouncing the missive. 

Joe deSousa / Flickr

Hartford City FC, a professional soccer team in the National Premier Soccer League, will begin its inaugural season this May on the New Britain campus of Central Connecticut State University.

Chion Wolf / WNPR


Students across Connecticut are scared and concerned about the immigration policies being pushed by President Donald Trump, according to state education officials. 

Governor Cuomo’s proposal to pass a constitutional amendment enshrining the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1973 abortion decision Roe v. Wade into the state’s constitution, is not gaining much traction in the state Senate.

Joe Gratz / Creative Commons

After the Hampden County district attorney announced he was not going to charge police officers in a 2015 assault, the head of the Springfield NAACP and one of the victim’s lawyers expressed concern about too much — and too little — police involvement in the investigation.

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Police Use of Force

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Citing Bias, New Report Calls For Better Data On Police Shootings

A report analyzing nearly 1,000 fatal police shootings that happened in 2015 claims evidence of racial bias. Researchers hope the study will strengthen a call for a national database on police use of force.

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Connecticurious

versageek / Creative Commons

What Has Sparked Your Curiosity In New Haven?

New Haven is currently home to more than 130,000 people. Initially named Newhaven in 1640, New Haven was Connecticut's co-capital city with Hartford until 1875. The city is the birthplace of former President George W. Bush , the hamburger , and public tree planting .

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Congress

How New England Senators Voted On Trump's Nominees

See the final votes for Trump's Cabinet appointments and other top positions that require Senate confirmation.

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More News: Health Care

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Aetna CEO: Obamacare "In A Death Spiral"

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini continues to make headlines with his frank views. Wednesday, one day after announcing the end of his company's merger plans with Humana, he had some choice words for the Wall Street Journal, when asked about the future of Obamacare.

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More News: Transportation

John H Gray / Creative Commons

Gov. Malloy Backs Enhanced Rail Plan For Western Massachusetts

Proponents of a plan to bring expanded intercity passenger rail service to western Massachusetts are getting support from Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy.

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The Beaker

New Satellite Isn't Just For Pretty Pictures

It's poised to change the way we do weather.

Special Coverage

WNPR's Coverage of a Drug Crisis

The nation is in the midst of a opioid crisis, and so is Connecticut.

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More from WNPR

After Much Suspense, A Syrian Family Journeys To Massachusetts

A family of Syrian refugees landed Friday at the Manchester-Boston Regional Airport in New Hampshire, completing a journey that almost never happened.

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Department of Homeland Security / Labeled For Noncommercial Reuse

No Plans For Large-Scale Deportation Raids In New England, But Immigrants Still Live In Fear

Reports of large scale, nationwide deportation raids are stoking fear in Massachusetts immigrant communities. Immigrants — both those with legal status and those living here illegally — are questioning exactly who is vulnerable for deportation.

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