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Washington

Open Or Closed? Here's What Happens In A Partial Government Shutdown

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ye4heQO1v0o Updated at 5:08 p.m. ET So, here we go again. The federal government is once more on the verge of a shutdown, and just like the last time, in October 2013, there will some things you'll notice that are shuttered and others you won't. Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney told reporters on Friday that the Trump administration is going to manage the shutdown differently than the last time. "We're not going to weaponize it," he said....

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This story was originally published Jan. 8, 2017 at 5:22 p.m. ET.

New England electricity customers could get a direct benefit from a cut in federal corporate taxes — lower utility bills.

Consumer advocates in New England are calling on regulators and utilities to turn over to ratepayers any savings from a reduction in the corporate income tax rate, which the recent tax law knocked down by 40 percent.

About half of New England’s households are on septic systems. That’s the highest proportion in the country. 

Federal Judge Temporarily Blocks Trump's Decision To End DACA

Jan 10, 2018

Updated 9:55 a.m. ET

A federal judge in California temporarily blocked the Trump administration's decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program late Tuesday night.

Widely known as DACA, the program protects young immigrants from deportation. In September, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that the program would be phased out.

Mark/flickr creative commons

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is ramping up federal enforcement of marijuana laws. That could put medical marijuana businesses and patients in Connecticut at risk.

Updated at 12:05 p.m. ET

Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., announced he will not seek re-election Wednesday, adding to a record number of House Republicans heading for the exits ahead of the 2018 midterms — perhaps seeing the writing on the wall of a possible wave election for Democrats.

There are now 31 Republicans who will not seek re-election in November: 19 who are retiring outright and another 12 who are running for higher office. And that list is is expected to grow in the coming weeks.

Uma Ramiah

Connecticut’s governor says his top legislative priority for 2018 will be to tighten the state’s gun laws, outlawing bump stocks and other weapons modifiers. 

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy has nominated state Associate Supreme Court Justice Andrew McDonald to be Connecticut’s next chief justice. If confirmed, McDonald would be the first openly gay state chief justice in the country.

Updated at 4:42 p.m. ET

The former British intelligence officer who authored the infamous Russia dossier wanted to show it to the FBI because he was concerned that then-presidential candidate Donald Trump was being "blackmailed."

Updated at 2:05 p.m. ET

Cocooned by cameras, North Korea's negotiating team crossed the border Tuesday by foot, walking about 100 yards to a conference building for the first high-level talks with South Korea in two years. Seated across from one another at a long rectangular table, diplomats from both sides expressed the need to improve frosty ties.

The Department of Homeland Security announced Monday that it will not renew Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Salvadorans.

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