Technology

vasabii/iStock / Thinkstock

United Technologies Boosts a Creative Culture That Transcends Location

As the pace of change grows ever faster, technology companies must innovate or die.
Read More

Mushroom Hunters

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

In Connecticut's Northwestern Hills, Fungi Lovers Search for a Tasty But Elusive Treat

Take a trip out to the Housatonic River Valley over the next few days, and if you’re lucky, you might spot a peculiar-looking fungus that’s a tasty trophy for mushroom hunters.
Read More
Chion Wolf / WNPR

The legislature has set lofty new goals for the state to create private sector jobs and boost its population.

Courtesy Clearwater

The sloop Clearwater is being readied for a return to the Hudson River after a winter of restoration work. 

JMA Students Javon Franklin, Sharonda Williams, and Jordan Goffe

Students from the Journalism and Media Academy magnet school abandoned their typical blue uniforms for formal attire as they interviewed an American civil rights leader who also struggled to end apartheid alongside Nelson Mandela.

The pharmaceutical company Pfizer said Friday it will move to prevent its drugs from being used in lethal injections.

Both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are turning their attention to the general election and to one of the most important decisions they will make — choosing a vice president.

Picking a vice president is the first "presidential level" decision any candidate makes. Although vice presidential candidates have rarely, perhaps never, determined the outcome of an election, the choice tells voters a lot about the candidate.

The two most important criteria are always the same:

1. Pick someone who would ready to be president, if necessary, and
2. DO NO HARM

Zillow

The boss is moving out alongside the company. The Connecticut house of General Electric CEO Jeff Immelt has been listed for sale. 

CLK Hatcher, Wikimedia Commons

The Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority has reached an agreement to develop the former Norwich State Hospital site, directly across the Thames River from its Mohegan Sun casino.

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

With only Democratic votes, Connecticut lawmakers on Friday passed a $19.7 billion Democratic budget that attempts to fix a projected $960 million deficit, but Republicans questioned whether the plan would solve the state's continued financial woes.

Graeme Lawton / Creative Commons

State agencies are beginning a more thorough review of a single eastern Connecticut site as the potential home for a new state police firearms training facility.

Pages

More News: Pharmaceuticals

Monsanto Calls Bayer's $62 Billion Takeover Offer 'Financially Inadequate'

Monsanto has rejected a $62 billion takeover bid from Bayer as "incomplete and financially inadequate," but left the door open to further negotiations with the German chemical and pharmaceutical giant."We believe in the substantial benefits an integrated strategy could provide to growers and broader society, and we have long respected Bayer's business," Monsanto Chairman and CEO Hugh Grant said in a statement."However, the current proposal significantly undervalues our company and also does...
Read More

WNPR's Coverage of a Drug Crisis

The nation is in the midst of a opioid crisis. Connecticut is, too -- and WNPR is bringing you stories you won't find anywhere else.

The Beaker

The Fantastic Flehmen Position

Why do some animals make those funny faces, anyway?

Zoned

"Get Your Old Tolling Infrastructure Here"

Massachusetts is phasing out some old tolling plaza gear, and Maine may buy it.

On Course

A Little Rant on Words

English is an odd bird for sure.

More News: Aerospace

Pratt and Whitney

Revolutionary Jet Engine Takes Connecticut Lap of Honor

Pratt and Whitney showed off its new Geared Turbofan engine "on wing" in Connecticut for the first time since it went into commercial service.
Read More

More from WNPR

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

At Yale Lab, Experimentation and Engineering Intersect With Musical Composition

If you could hop into a time machine and transport yourself forward to a 23rd-century concert hall, what music would you hear -- and what would the instruments look like? From a classroom at Yale University, WNPR explored one possible future musical timeline.
Read More