Development

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

In West Hartford, a Look at the Trials of Transit-Oriented Development

There's a shell of an old Pontiac car dealership at a corner of West Hartford’s industrial district that to the public eye -- and perhaps the public’s ire -- is littered with trash and weeds, with four lanes of fast traffic rushing by.
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Opioids

Office of Gov. Dannel Malloy

Gov. Malloy Signs Law to Battle Opioid Addiction and Overdose

Governor Dannel Malloy signed into a law on Friday what he called "the most comprehensive strategy" in the nation for combating opioid addiction and overdose.
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U.S. Department of Education

Connecticut's high school graduation rates reached an all time high last year. But a closer look at the figures reveals the state still has some work to do.

Baltimore police Officer Edward Nero has been found not guilty of all four misdemeanor charges he faced in connection with the arrest of Freddie Gray.

Gray died on April 19, 2015, after suffering injuries while in police custody.

Following the ruling, Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement, "This is our American system of justice and police officers must be afforded the same justice system as every other citizen in the city, state, and country."

U.S. Navy

Yale University has awarded more than 3,600 degrees during ceremonies at its 315th commencement. Later Monday, the school will confer military commissions to its first group of ROTC graduates in more than four decades.

Diane Orson / WNPR

It's commencement time at colleges and universities nationwide and many graduates are asking themselves: what’s next?

President Obama announced Monday that the U.S. is fully lifting a five-decades-long arms embargo against Vietnam.

The embargo on lethal military equipment had been partially lifted in 2014; now it will be raised fully, the White House says. The president spoke about the decision from Hanoi, during the first day of a weeklong trip to Asia.

Six years of your life. Or 2,190 days. That's about how long the average woman will spend having her periods.

For some women, that's too many days, too many periods.

More women in their 20s and 30s are choosing contraception that may suppress their menstrual cycles, says Dr. Elizabeth Micks, who runs an OB-GYN clinic at the University of Washington in Seattle. "In general, I think views are changing really rapidly," Micks says. "That need to have regular periods is not just in our society anymore."

Since it came onto the scene in 1943, penicillin has made syphilis a thing of the past — almost. Now, the sexually transmitted disease is making a comeback in the U.S. and there's a shortage of the medication used to treat it.

Pfizer, the company that supplies it, says it's experiencing "an unanticipated manufacturing delay," and in a letter to consumers wrote that it would be providing just one-third of the usual monthly demand until July.

Howard Smith / Creative Commons

New data show a surge in drug overdose deaths in Connecticut during the first three months of this year involving the opioid fentanyl.  The information was released on Friday by the State’'s Chief Medical Examiner Dr. James Gill.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

A Connecticut man who said he was sexually abused as a child at a private school in Massachusetts wants to see the statute of limitations on the crime abolished. 

WNPR/David DesRoches

It was an emotional school board meeting for Superintendent Alicia Roy. After hearing Thursday evening that more than two-thirds of the district'’s teachers want her to resign, she became visibly upset, and struggled to respond.

Pages

Memorial Day 2016

WNPR Presents Special Programs on Monday, May 30, 2016.

We're airing two documentaries from American RadioWorks in place of our usual programs.

More News: Metcalf on Music

Shawn Robbins / Creative Commons

Dylan at 75: Can This Really Be the End?

As celebrity milestone birthdays go, Dylan’s 75th passed pretty quietly last Tuesday.
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WNPR's Coverage of a Drug Crisis

The nation is in the midst of a opioid crisis. Connecticut is, too -- and WNPR is bringing you stories you won't find anywhere else.

More News: Jazz Corridor

Steven Sussman

Hartford Pays Homage to Paul Brown, Longtime Pillar of the City’s Jazz Community

If you were selecting a patron saint of jazz for Hartford, a strong contender for canonization would most certainly be Paul Brown, a miracle worker whose countless good works for the music and local jazz musicians over many decades brought great joy, peace and comfort to the capital city.
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The Beaker

The Fantastic Flehmen Position

Why do some animals make those funny faces, anyway?

Zoned

"Get Your Old Tolling Infrastructure Here"

Massachusetts is phasing out some old tolling plaza gear, and Maine may buy it.

More News: Congress

David Maiolo / Creative Commons

U.S. Senate Passes the Sexual Assault Survivors' Rights Act

A bill that would protect the rights of sexual assault victims has passed the U.S. Senate with unanimous support. The measure, which was co-sponsored by Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal, focuses primarily on rape kits.
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On Course

A Little Rant on Words

English is an odd bird for sure.

More News: Travel

Record Memorial Day Travel Predicted: Expect Traffic On The Roads

Travel forecasters are predicting busy highwaysthis Memorial Day weekend. AAA expects more than 38 million people to travel over the holiday, the highest volume in a decade.
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More from WNPR

Diane Orson / WNPR

After College, Americorps Members Explore a Passion for Public Service in New Haven

It's commencement time at colleges and universities nationwide and many graduates are asking themselves: what’s next?
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