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2016 Election

The Russia Investigations: How Many More Maria Butinas Are There?

This week in the Russia investigations: Two big questions about the second-most famous Russian in the world and Rod Rosenstein fires a warning shot. Finnish fallout No Hollywood screenwriter could get away with turning in a treatment for this week. The studio bosses would roll their eyes and ask for the story to be more plausible. And yet Americans — and the rest of the world — really did just live through five days in which the president of the United States publicly sided with the president...

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Japan and the European Union have signed a massive trade deal that creates an open-trade zone for more than 600 million people. The EU and Japan account for about one-third of GDP worldwide.

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

The Region 10 School District in Burlington recently informed parents their plans to train and arm security guards for the upcoming school year. But many other schools in the state take a different approach to student safety.

More than 400 years after Galileo Galilei discovered the first of Jupiter's moons, astronomers have found a dozen more — including one they've dubbed "oddball" — orbiting the planet. That brings the total number of Jovian moons to 79.

WNHH FM / New Haven Independent

Legendary Connecticut shoreline reporter Marcia Chambers has passed away. Chambers, who lived in Branford, died Friday at Smilow Cancer Hospital. 

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

In Connecticut, a debate is underway about what to do with a protected stretch of watershed land between a public drinking water supply and an old stone quarry.

Trump Digs Coal, And GOP Candidates Skip Climate Forum

Jul 17, 2018
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

By skipping a forum on climate change Monday night, the five Republican candidates for governor saved themselves from two unpalatable options: Defending the Trump administration’s love affair with coal to furious environmentalists, or riling the GOP base a month before the primary by publicly breaking with the president.

Updated at 4:34 p.m. ET

Charges accusing a woman of trying to build bridges between the Russian government and American political leaders via the National Rifle Association have delivered a breakthrough in understanding one aspect of the attack on the 2016 election: "infiltration."

Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats on Monday directly challenged comments by President Trump, saying the U.S. intelligence community has been "clear in our assessments of Russian meddling in the 2016 election."

Coats has maintained an extremely low profile, rarely making public comments, since President Trump appointed him last year.

Updated at 7:19 p.m. ET

Many Republicans harshly criticized President Trump's performance Monday at a news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin, in which Trump said Putin's denial that Moscow interfered with the 2016 election is "strong and powerful" — despite U.S. intelligence findings to the contrary.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Two Central American migrant children sent to Connecticut after being separated from their parents at the border have been reunited with their parents and the families released into the community.

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CCSU Aims To Become Center For LGBT Culture And Scholarship

Central Connecticut State University has hired a full-time director for its LGBT Center , in what the university says is an effort to become a more inclusive institution.

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A Note To Our Audience

Connecticut Public Radio's coverage of the 2018 elections.

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