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White House Transition

Chion Wolf

WWE's Linda McMahon Gets Small Business Nod From Donald Trump

Linda McMahon, World Wrestling Entertainment co-founder and sometime Senate candidate in Connecticut, has been nominated by President-elect Donald Trump to lead the Small Business Administration.
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Budget

DANIEL LOBO / CREATIVE COMMONS

Cuts to Care 4 Kids Program Will Cost the State in the Long-Run

Connecticut's Office of Early Childhood is changing their eligibility rules for a child care subsidy program due in part to increased costs.
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Health

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Rising Price of a Life-Saving Drug Complicates Efforts To Combat Heroin

Naloxone is a lifesaving drug that can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose. Efforts have been made in the current opioid epidemic to make it more widely available, but the medication's rising price is complicating that.
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Todd Gray / CPBN

Ask WNPR!

What have you always wondered about? WNPR is taking your questions.
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President-elect Donald Trump has chosen Dr. Ben Carson to lead the Department of Housing and Urban Development in his incoming administration.

"Ben Carson has a brilliant mind and is passionate about strengthening communities and families within those communities," Trump said in a statement released Monday. "We have talked at length about my urban renewal agenda and our message of economic revival, very much including our inner cities."

WNPR/David DesRoches

Federal and state laws require students to take several standardized tests each year, but critics argue that these so-called high stakes tests aren't a reliable way to see how well students know certain subjects.

SANOFI PASTEUR / CREATIVE COMMONS

Researchers have discovered a link between the mosquito-borne Zika virus and glaucoma. A new report, published by a team of doctors at the Yale School of Public Health and in Brazil, says the virus can cause glaucoma in infants who were exposed during pregnancy. 

The Army Corps of Engineers has denied a permit for the construction of a key section of the Dakota Access Pipeline, granting a major victory to protesters who have been demonstrating for months.

The decision essentially halts the construction on the 1,172-mile oil pipeline just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Thousands of demonstrators from across the country had flocked to North Dakota in protest.

Connecticut House Democrats

Longtime Democratic state lawmaker Betty Boukus has died at the age of 73.  The Plainville state representative recently lost her bid for a 12th term in the General Assembly.  

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Residents of Southeastern Connecticut held a vigil Thursday night in Montville in response to a string of local overdose deaths this past year.

Nancy Eve Cohen / New England Public Radio

In the weeks after Election Day, in response to current events, the U.S. flag on the main flagpole at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts has alternately been flown at full-staff and half-staff, burned, removed, and now replaced.

Lori Mack / WNPR

A federal judge has ordered a 24-hour grocery on the campus of Yale University to pay several former employees a total of $170,000 in damages, after they were forced to work for as little as $3.00 an hour.

FuelCell Energy, Inc.

Danbury-based FuelCell Energy, Inc., announced Thursday it will cut nearly 100 jobs, news which comes on the heels of a decision by the state to pass over several clean energy proposals submitted by the company.

Sandy Hook Ride on Washington

The Connecticut Supreme Court will hear an appeal in a case brought by Newtown families against gun maker Remington Arms. The families are arguing that the manufacturer shouldn't have marketed and sold military-style weapons to civilians.

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Economy

Emmanuel Huybrechts / Creative Commons

Connecticut Eyes Massachusetts Job Growth for Economic Secrets

Connecticut’s declining jobs numbers in recent months have made the contrast with its New England neighbors even more stark. While the Nutmeg State has yet to regain all the jobs it lost in the great recession, Massachusetts is seemingly booming.
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More News: Hartford

Centerplan Companies

Hartford Loses Eminent Domain Fight, Ordered to Pay Nearly $3 Million More

Two years ago, the city of Hartford used eminent domain to take private land from a developer to be used for part of its baseball stadium development project. For that land, the city paid $1.98 million. But now, a state court judge has ruled that the figure wasn’t nearly enough.
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The Beaker

Winter Is Coming.

But for this big-footed hare, snow isn't a problem.

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Special Coverage

WNPR's Coverage of a Drug Crisis

The nation is in the midst of a opioid crisis, and so is Connecticut. We're focusing this week on special reporting.

More News: Environment

New Report Urges Action to Address Effects of Climate Change on N.H.'s Seacoast

Yesterday, a new report was released with suggestions for how Seacoast communities should prepare for the effects of climate change. The document could influence town planning and development in the region for years.The report came from the Coastal Risk and Hazards Commission, which was created by the legislature back in 2013. It had 37-members representing Seacoast towns, state agencies, and private-sector interests.Their report identifies where the Seacoast is vulnerable to the effects of...
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More from WNPR

Yale Report Tries To Count People Held In Solitary Confinement

A cell the size of a parking space is where more than 60,000 prisoners nationwide are being held in solitary confinement. That’s according to a study by Yale Law School and the Association of State Correctional Administrators released Wednesday. And there could be more people who were not counted because states like Maine, Rhode Island and Vermont couldn’t provide data.
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